Leadership Quotation

#1
Anyone recall a military quotation about leaders who practice constant change to falsely give the impression of progress?
 
#4
We trained hard ... but it seemed that every time we were beginning to form up into teams we would be reorganized. I was to learn later in life that we tend to meet any new situation by reorganizing; and a wonderful method it can be for creating the illusion of progress while producing confusion, inefficiency, and demoralization

Arbiter, Gauis Petronius
 
#5
This one?

We trained very hard, but it seemed that every time we were beginning to form up into teams we would be reorganized. I was to learn later in life that we tend to meet any new situation by reorganizing--it can be a wonderful method of creating the illusion of progress while creating confusion, inefficiency and demoralisation."

Attributed to Caius Petronius
 
#6
We trained hard ... but it seemed that every time we were beginning to form up into teams we would be reorganized. I was to learn later in life that we tend to meet any new situation by reorganizing; and a wonderful method it can be for creating the illusion of progress while producing confusion, inefficiency, and demoralization.
 
#11
So who was this cynical Petronius? The quote is usually attributed to Gaius Petronius Arbiter (c. AD22–67), alias Titus Petronius Niger, who was Nero’s adviser on elegance and good taste (and also the reputed author of the ‘Satyricon’, a sardonic portrait of Roman society that takes the form of a homoerotic reworking of Homer’s Odyssey).On the other hand, many references to the quote give a date of 210BC, which may relate to an earlier Petronius, a naval commander.
But it matters not a jot which Petronius you plump for because there is not a scrap of evidence for any Petronian origin for the words. Scholars can find the quote in no manuscript or printed source earlier than a magazine article in 1957.
And there is some evidence that the words first saw the light of day in the late 1940s on a barrack room bulletin board in a British army base in occupied West Germany. One can certainly imagine a classically educated conscript contriving the alleged classical quote as a sly dig at inept military management.
Whoever the real author was, he has fooled many more than just his army superiors. The quote can now be found — always attributed to Petronius — in many supposedly scholarly books and articles and also, not surprisingly, all over the internet. But although the attribution may be false, the words clearly strike a chord.
 
T

Taffd

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#13
So who was this cynical Petronius? The quote is usually attributed to Gaius Petronius Arbiter (c. AD22–67), alias Titus Petronius Niger, who was Nero’s adviser on elegance and good taste (and also the reputed author of the ‘Satyricon’, a sardonic portrait of Roman society that takes the form of a homoerotic reworking of Homer’s Odyssey).On the other hand, many references to the quote give a date of 210BC, which may relate to an earlier Petronius, a naval commander.
But it matters not a jot which Petronius you plump for because there is not a scrap of evidence for any Petronian origin for the words. Scholars can find the quote in no manuscript or printed source earlier than a magazine article in 1957.
And there is some evidence that the words first saw the light of day in the late 1940s on a barrack room bulletin board in a British army base in occupied West Germany. One can certainly imagine a classically educated conscript contriving the alleged classical quote as a sly dig at inept military management.
Whoever the real author was, he has fooled many more than just his army superiors. The quote can now be found — always attributed to Petronius — in many supposedly scholarly books and articles and also, not surprisingly, all over the internet. But although the attribution may be false, the words clearly strike a chord.
That's fuckin' brilliant.

While I'm not suggesting it is, your post could be the made-up bullshit. Just think of the fun that could be had re-writing history across the net.
 
#15
Thanks Arrse; Petronius was the one I remember - correct attribution or not. Just going through redundancy selection and this came to mind.
 
#16
How about a tag team?
The greatest enemy of progress is not stagnation, but false progress.

Or for those that 'do process'

'The real danger is not that computers will begin to think like men, but that men will begin to think like computers.'

Sidney j harris.
 
#17
There are your guns My Lord...

(Captain Louis Edward Nolan, Balaclava, 25th October 1854)
 
#20
I see no ships.
 

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