Leader of Iranian Quds Force Terminated by Order of Trump

Momentum (Tehran) publicity stunts backfires

 
Maybe, but nothing, zip, zilch, nada from Team Trump about this imminent threat.
absolutely incorrect - the Trump team has briefed the senate and congress behind closed doors and trump himself has publicly stated that 4 embassies were to be attacked - ‘We’ (joe public) are not on the need to know list and some US politicians (Schiff) may have wanted more info but others came out of the very same briefing stating that it was the best briefing they had ever received! - we will never know who is correct because it is a subjective opinion and trump hating politicians are not surprisingly playing politics in an election year . As an aside it may surprise you to know that even the highly partisan trump hating New York Times last week published a story stating that in the last 40 years trump is the president who has least used military action - it appears that he is actually not the war monger he is accused of being by the left and is actually being very patient and careful to not over react against lots of provocation.
 
absolutely incorrect - the Trump team has briefed the senate and congress behind closed doors and trump himself has publicly stated that 4 embassies were to be attacked - ‘We’ (joe public) are not on the need to know list and some US politicians (Schiff) may have wanted more info but others came out of the very same briefing stating that it was the best briefing they had ever received! - we will never know who is correct because it is a subjective opinion and trump hating politicians are not surprisingly playing politics in an election year . As an aside it may surprise you to know that even the highly partisan trump hating New York Times last week published a story stating that in the last 40 years trump is the president who has least used military action - it appears that he is actually not the war monger he is accused of being by the left and is actually being very patient and careful to not over react against lots of provocation.

Funny thing is, as was noted by some big cheese on on't telly, if the process to blow up embassies was in train, it would still go ahead even after you killed the alleged bad man behind it.

And here we are, no big smoking holes in the ground on the site off former US Embassies.

Meanwhile, Its as close as the Canadian PM can come to calling the US actions 'BS'

 
Funny thing is, as was noted by some big cheese on on't telly, if the process to blow up embassies was in train, it would still go ahead even after you killed the alleged bad man behind it.

And here we are, no big smoking holes in the ground on the site off former US Embassies.

Meanwhile, Its as close as the Canadian PM can come to calling the US actions 'BS'

Not if it was waiting for his final authority to proceed.

Unless you know something about the internal processes of Quds (or whoever) that the rest of us don't.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Long post -apologies.

A Reuters video : 'Clerics get lost!': Iran protests rage after plane disaster

Iran protests rage on over plane disaster (Reuters)

And report from the Financial Times Tehran-based correspondent:Najmeh Bozorgmehr:


In little over a week, public feeling in Iran has swung from fervent support for the regime in the face of American aggression, to anger and distrust after the country’s military leaders lied over the downing of a commercial passenger jet that killed all on board.

After the US assassination of the military commander Qassem Soleimani in neighbouring Iraq on 3 January, millions of Iranians across the country came together to pay tribute to the fallen soldier. The huge funeral turnout amazed political and military leaders, who just two months earlier had faced the most violent anti-government protests since the revolution.

Iranian politicians interpreted the nationalism evoked by Soleimani’s death as a sign of continued public support for their controversial regional and defence policies, despite the debilitating impact of US sanctions.


Related: Iran protesters call for leaders to quit

This image from a Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020 video provided by the New York-based Center for Human Rights in Iran shows a crowd fleeing police near Azadi, or Freedom, Square in Tehran, Iran. Iranian demonstrators defied a heavy police presence Sunday night to protest their country's days of denials that it shot down a Ukrainian passenger plane carrying 176 people, the latest unrest to roil the capital amid soaring tensions with the United States.
© AP This image from a Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020 video provided by the New York-based Center for Human Rights in Iran shows a crowd fleeing police near Azadi, or Freedom, Square in Tehran, Iran.

Iranian demonstrators defied a heavy police presence Sunday night to protest their country's days of denials that it shot down a Ukrainian passenger plane carrying 176 people, the latest unrest to roil the capital amid soaring tensions with the United States.
But then on Saturday Iran admitted the Ukraine International Airlines passenger jet that came down last Wednesday shortly after take off from Tehran had not crashed as previously stated, but had been mistakenly shot down by Iran’s air defence system.


In this photograph taken Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, a riot police officer watches protesters demonstrating to remember victims of a Ukrainian airplane shot down by an Iranian missile in Tehran, Iran.
© AP In this photograph taken Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, a riot police officer watches protesters demonstrating to remember victims of a Ukrainian airplane shot down by an Iranian missile in Tehran, Iran.


Overnight public attitudes changed as Iranians poured on to the streets in Tehran and other cities to mourn the dead and challenge the Islamic regime over its devastating mistake. Gone were the slogans heard during Soleimani’s funeral of “Death to the US” and “Death to Israel”.

Instead protesters chanted “Guards; you are the dictator; you are our Isis” and “Shame on you, guards; leave the country alone”.


The public faith that the guards gained and its big military victory [attacking US forces] was damaged overnight in what is Iran’s equivalent of the Chernobyl disaster

Saeed Laylaz, Iranian political analyst


The acknowledgment of Iranian culpability for the death of the 176 passenger and crew on board, including 82 Iranians and 63 Canadians, came after senior officials had denied the jet could have been hit by an Iranian missile and accused the US using such allegations for psychological warfare.

Officials, including the Iranian ambassador to the UK, have since retracted their statements, adding that they had previously been informed by Iranian authorities that Iran was not to blame.



  • Slide 1 of 45: Ukraine International Airlines (UIA) President Yevhenii Dykhne light candles to a makeshift memorial for the crew members of the Ukrainian Boeing 737-800 plane that crashed in Iran, at the Boryspil International Airport, not so far from Kyiv, Ukraine , on 11 January, 2020.  (Photo by STR/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
  • Slide 2 of 45: Attendees hold roses during a moment of silence for the plane crash victims of Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 as Iranian Americans from across California converge in Los Angeles to participate in the California Convention for a Free Iran and to express support for nationwide protests in Iran from Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 11, 2020. REUTERS/ Patrick T. Fallon

  • Slide 4 of 45: TEHRAN, IRAN - JANUARY 11: People gather for a candlelight vigil to remember the victims of the Ukraine plane crash, at the gate of Amri Kabir University where some of the victims of the crash were former students, on January 11th, 2020 in Tehran, Iran. Iranian military acknowledged that its armed forces unintentionally shot down the Ukrainian jetliner that crashed earlier this week, killing all 176 aboard, after the government had repeatedly denied Western accusations that it was responsible. (Photo by Majid Saeedi/Getty Images)


Saeed Laylaz, an Iranian political analyst, said the decision by some in the military and political leadership to mislead others over the tragedy had rocked public trust in the regime. He compared it to the decision by Soviet leaders to hide facts about the disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in 1986, a course of action that would ultimately contribute to the break-up of the Soviet Union.

“A major part of the public faith that the guards gained and its big military victory [attacking US forces] were damaged overnight in what is Iran’s equivalent of the Chernobyl disaster,” he said.

“This has led to huge splits inside the ruling system, at a time the power struggle was already tense, on why the guards hid a reality even from the president when they knew from the first second of the incident what had happened.”


President Donald Trump on April 8, 2019 announced the United States is designating Iran's elite military force, the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, a terrorist organization. Trump said in a statement that the "unprecedented" move "recognizes the reality that Iran is not only a State Sponsor of Terrorism, but that the IRGC actively participates in, finances, and promotes terrorism as a tool of statecraft." (

Mostafa Tajzadeh, a pro-reform former official who has since broken with the Islamic regime said the deception was shocking. “I admit that I could never believe this level of lying, hiding and fooling in the Islamic republic,” he wrote in a post on Instagram. “Why and how we have reached this level?”

The Revolutionary Guards has said it had not tried to hide its responsibility for the crash, but had been examining the reasons behind the unintentional shooting. The country’s political leaders were informed of the mistake on Friday, said Amir Ali Hajizadeh, commander of the Revolutionary Guards’ air forces, who accepted responsibility for the mistake.




  • Slide 1 of 50: U.S. Soldiers stand at a site of Iranian bombing at Ain al-Asad air base in Anbar, Iraq, Monday, Jan. 13, 2020.
  • Slide 2 of 50: A U.S. soldier stands at a site of Iranian bombing, in Ain al-Asad air base, Anbar, Iraq, Monday, Jan. 13, 2020.
  • Slide 3 of 50: Iranian riot police stand guard as protesters gather in front of Tehran's Amir Kabir University on January 11, 2020.
  • Slide 4 of 50: An Iranian man confronts riot police during a demonstration outside Tehran's Amir Kabir University on January 11, 2020.
Iranians protest to show their sympathy to victims of Ukraine International Airlines Boeing 737-800 in front of the Amir Kabir University in Tehran, Iran, on Jan. 11.21/50 SLIDES© Damian Dovarganes/AP Phot



Iran says the US shares the blame for the tragedy because it initiated the period of military aggression when it killed Soleimani. Hardline politicians also insist that the increased domestic credibility gained by the Revolutionary Guards following Soleimani’s death and Iran’s retaliation against American troops in Iraq remains intact.

“That achievement is certainly not overshadowed by this mistake which was the result of US threats to hit back and some immature behaviours like the delayed acknowledgment of responsibility and the failure to cancel civilian flights,” said Hamid Reza Taraghi, a politician close to the country’s hardliners. “Iran’s policy of kicking the US out of the region is unchanged and you will see Iran will strike another major blow [against the US] directly or indirectly very soon.”

But many Iranians are furious, both with the apparent attempt to hide the truth and the earlier decision by Iranian authorities not to stop civilian flights when the heightened risk of war with the US had put the country’s air defence system on high alert.


Iranian security forces stand guard in front of the British embassy in the capital Tehran on January 12, 2020 during demonstrations following the British ambassador's arrest for allegedly attending an illegal demonstration.
© Getty Iranian security forces stand guard in front of the British embassy in the capital Tehran on January 12, 2020 during demonstrations following the British ambassador's arrest for allegedly attending an illegal demonstration.


“We don’t want the Islamic republic”, protesters in Tehran chanted at the weekend as they called for the resignation of top politicians including supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

Having promised to take revenge for Soleimani’s death on American soldiers, none were killed in Iran’s air strikes on Iraqi bases. Instead it is the second time in a week that dozens of Iranians have lost their lives, after at least 60 people were crushed to death on Tuesday in a stampede at Soleimani’s burial.

Many in Iran feel that incompetent officials, with little respect for the lives of ordinary, are responsible.

One bitter joke that is being widely shared on Iranian social media reads:

“The Revolutionary Guards have sent a message to the US that, if you attack us once again, we will level Iran to the ground.”


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Comment - There is more than one side to the Iran-USA saga. What is Britain's interest?

I spent three years watching FCO officials dance around the issue of Anglo-Iranian relations, which, unsurprisingly were ALWAYS seen through the prism of 'What does Washington think?'.

The FCO held up paper tissue excuses for not normalising UK/Iranian relations - but that was the backstop reality.

Like the USA, Britain and Iran had a close relationship previously, not least in the field of Defence, much like the relationship with Oman or Saudi today. We are happy to deal with the regime in Riyadh, despite the Wahhabi regime there.( the majority of the 9/11 terrorists were Saudi nationals. )

The Americans sold Iran state-of-the-art F-14s and Chinooks. We sold them 800 tanks. The former Royal Ordnance plc had a signed order for a further 1200 for delivery post 1980.

The Iranian Navy also bought frigates from Vospers, very similar to our Type 21s. Rolls Royce Olympus engines powered shoreside electrical generation plants. Hillman/Chrysler built a car factory just outside Tehran.

FV4030/2 / Shir 1 / Khalid MBT

Anyone who was around MoD in the late 70s and early 80s would have been aware of the MoD's 'Iran Tank Office'. The Shah's regime was a major British client.

The nature of the Khomeini theocracy has meant that UK has held Iran at arms length for the last 40 years.
Given the enduring US enmity towards the regime [largely based on the loss of face over the Iran hostage crisis ] it would have been impossible for Britain to do anything other.

Japan,Korea and China have had no such issues, seeing Iran as just another trading partner.


France and Germany have equally been much less reticent in doing business with the mullahs than we have.
( Khomeini was a political refugee in Paris for years, before returning to Iran)

German exports to Iran in 2018 leapt: German exports to Iran soar ahead of U.S. sanctions

QUESTION: Is it in British interests to regard Iran as perma-enemy ?

It is a tough ask to reconcile our friendship with USA, when the two countries are at daggers drawn as a matter of routine.

Even if the Mullahs were removed from office tomorrow, the current Foreign Secretary ( as the son of a Czech immigrant who fled the Nazis) would find it almost impossible to convince the Iranians that he was an impartial negotiator in this instance.

One for King Solomon.
 
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QUESTION: Is it in British interests to regard Iran as perma-enemy ?
therein lies the problem! - if, like the French and Germans all you are thinking about is trade when your economies are tanking then you may be prepared to overlook Iran’s disruption of the ME and war via funding and subversion to proxies in many countries which has directly led to the death and injury of thousands - including UK service people. Then there is the issue of Iran continuing to persue nuclear weapons and the likelihood of war with Israel when m/if they succeed . Then you have the issue of it’s Continued suppression of its own people and it’s ability to disrupt global oil movement.
The real question is if it is ignored will it all go away and nothing bad will happen ? - I would suggest to you that based on its actions to date and whose in charge of it Iran has given no indication that it is going to stop exporting terror or become more democratic .
the best outcome would be an internal overthrow of its govt to be replaced by people more concerned with supporting Iran and it’s people than trying to change the whole ME

edited to add - I think that we do need to consider them as an enemy whilst they threaten global securityand stability
 
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If I were the FCO, I'd advise HMG to stay away until the dust settles.
 
Trade and JCPOA - Iran behaves

Donald throws it all in the bin - Iran misbehaves


Iran does play by strategic rules, alas, Donalds can't understand the difference between Irans tactical local actions, and its strategic aims
 
Not if it was waiting for his final authority to proceed.

Unless you know something about the internal processes of Quds (or whoever) that the rest of us don't.
Unless of course some senior Iranians have looked at the charred remains of the last guy who went a bit far with America and decided discretion is the better part of valour.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
the best outcome would be an internal overthrow of its govt to be replaced by people more concerned with supporting Iran and it’s people than trying to change the whole ME

At best, we'd get another Pakistan.
A notionally democratic country that has a de facto military final say.
Iran does have a functional Parliament and legislature, just like Pakistan.
 
At best, we'd get another Pakistan.
A notionally democratic country that has a de facto military final say.
Iran does have a functional Parliament and legislature, just like Pakistan.
Pakistan is still a backward country with a large number of religious zealots.
Iran is a country that was civilised until 1979 and it would appear would like to rejoin civilisation apart from some hardliners. We should encourage it.
 
Pakistan is still a backward country with a large number of religious zealots.
Iran is a country that was civilised until 1979 and it would appear would like to rejoin civilisation apart from some hardliners. We should encourage it.

Iran even prior to 1979 was a fairly religious country with plenty of 'zealots'.
It was the Shahs discrimination against the Mullahs that triggered quite a bit of discontent.
Contrary to US belief, Mullahs are not ignorant men obsessed 100% with Religion.
If the mullahs went away tomorrow, Iran is not going to turn into a nation of bacon eaters and 'America on the Gulf'.
Qom will still be the centre of the Shia world.
 
The Mullahs have been in power for just over 40 years.
That doesn't happen if they were as unpopular as Washington fondly imagines.

Day to day, the Mullahs don't impact much on the life of the average Mr Jafarrian.
Just like Nazi Germany, the regime has been careful to allow the day to day running of things to stay in the hands of locally accountable and electable authorities.

There is plenty off headroom for the Mullahs to give a few extra freedoms to the general population to buy browny points without impacting their final say.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
The best outcome would be an internal overthrow of its govt to be replaced by people more concerned with supporting Iran and it’s people than trying to change the whole ME
It won't happen in Iran anymore than it happened in Iraq under Saddam, despite a lot of wishful thinking in Langley.

And the whole M.E picture is skewed by US unconditional support for the one country they see as their indispensable ally ( and no that's not Britain) , despite all evidence to contrary. :)

It's not all about trade - but Britain, France and Germany have interests which are not those of the U.S - end of.

And we should be a little less shy of making those interests our focus, rather than the endless horror-struck fascination with any kind of Special Relationship.
 
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The Mullahs have been in power for just over 40 years.
That doesn't happen if they were as unpopular as Washington fondly imagines.

Day to day, the Mullahs don't impact much on the life of the average Mr Jafarrian.
Just like Nazi Germany, the regime has been careful to allow the day to day running of things to stay in the hands of locally accountable and electable authorities.

There is plenty off headroom for the Mullahs to give a few extra freedoms to the general population to buy browny points without impacting their final say.
Funny old thing , popular is not something regimes/supreme leaders for life care too much about when they control the states media, internet, religious police and regularly crack down on any decension or protests etc etc
 
Funny old thing , popular is not something regimes/supreme leaders for life care too much about when they control the states media, internet, religious police and regularly crack down on any decension or protests etc etc

Well actually, yes, yes they do.
Regimes that are 100% totalitarian don't last.

Shrub convinced himself Sadaam was 100% hated by Iraqis - alas, he wasn't.
 
Day to day, the Mullahs don't impact much on the life of the average Mr Jafarrian.
Just like Nazi Germany, the regime has been careful to allow the day to day running of things to stay in the hands of locally accountable and electable authorities.
You could not be further from the truth. Under both regimes daily life in almost all its aspects is/was controlled from top to bottom. As for accountability and elected you really are having a giraffe.
 

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