LCT 7074 - D Day veteran and other historic vessels

Yokel

LE
Royal Navy: Restoration of last D-Day survivor wins museum award

The seven-year £7m dream of restoring one of the last surviving D-Day warships has been crowned with a national award.

Landing Craft Tank 7074 – which now enjoys pride of place on Southsea waterfront at the D-Day Story museum – has been named as the restoration/conservation project of the year at the national Museum and Heritage Awards.

Judges said the challenges faced by the team from the National Museum of the Royal Navy and the D-Day Story to turn a sunken hull into a visitor attraction which captures the spirit of 1944 and those who served in such ships had been overcome “brilliantly”.

LCT7074 is the last of more than 800 landing craft (tank) which delivered Allied armour to the beaches of Normandy in June 1944 – and one of only a small number of vessels still left from the Operation Neptune armada.

When the restoration project began in 2014, the ship was sunk at her mooring in Birkenhead.

With the help of lottery cash – which pumped well over £5m into the overall project – the vessel was raised and brought to Portsmouth for a two-year restoration job in the naval base before the refurbished craft was moved to its new permanent home on the waterfront.

The ship, with a Sherman and Churchill tank embarked, is now open to the public to view with films and displays explaining her role in June 1944.

The award citation reads: “The scale of this project is astonishing and was, without doubt, challenging. It was detailed in its conservation principles and brilliantly delivered – the judges felt that it was a remarkable achievement.”

Professor Dominic Tweddle, Director General of the National Museum of the Royal Navy said the award recognised “the unique and extraordinary skills” the team of conservators possessed.

“The challenge to conserve a fragile low-grade steel vessel made to last months and ensure she is robust enough to tell the vital story of D-Day for generations to come was immense,” he added.
 
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RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
For info, LCT 7074 which used to be moored in Liverpool and was know as "The Club Ship Landfall" -- a den of iniquity even in the dock area.

Can't remember which dock, but it was visible from Regent Road. My old man always said that it was unsinkable where it was because it rested on a bed of beer bottles.
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
Clubship Landfall
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Salthouse Dock!
 

Yokel

LE
Royal Navy - Historic Royal Navy ‘Spitfires of the seas’ take centre stage in new exhibition

Two World War 2 boats are to be the stars of a new exhibition at the National Museum of the Royal Navy’s Explosion Museum in Gosport.

Coastal Motor Boat CMB331 and Motor Torpedo Boat MTB71, each measuring almost 60ft, will be in The Night Hunters: The Royal Navy’s Coastal Forces at War, which tells the story of the squadron from August 1916 to the late 1950s.

Immortalised as “Spitfires of the Seas” the boats, Coastal Motor Boat CMB331 and Motor Torpedo Boat MTB71, were often deployed in the dark, at incredibly high speeds as small but fast attack motor boats which carried torpedoes.

It was a branch of the Royal Navy commonly manned by very young men, often reservist volunteers, in wooden craft, heavily armed carrying ammunition, explosives and high-octane fuel as they went in to attack enemy naval forces at close range.
 
Royal Navy - Historic Royal Navy ‘Spitfires of the seas’ take centre stage in new exhibition

Two World War 2 boats are to be the stars of a new exhibition at the National Museum of the Royal Navy’s Explosion Museum in Gosport.

Coastal Motor Boat CMB331 and Motor Torpedo Boat MTB71, each measuring almost 60ft, will be in The Night Hunters: The Royal Navy’s Coastal Forces at War, which tells the story of the squadron from August 1916 to the late 1950s.

Immortalised as “Spitfires of the Seas” the boats, Coastal Motor Boat CMB331 and Motor Torpedo Boat MTB71, were often deployed in the dark, at incredibly high speeds as small but fast attack motor boats which carried torpedoes.


It was a branch of the Royal Navy commonly manned by very young men, often reservist volunteers, in wooden craft, heavily armed carrying ammunition, explosives and high-octane fuel as they went in to attack enemy naval forces at close range.
The HQ of the Royal Naval Patrol Service during WW2 was here in Lowestoft and named HMS Europa.
The building still exists and is a museum dedicated to the RNPS and is at a place called Sparrows Nest. On the cliff above the museum is the memorial commemorating all the vessels and crews lost during WW2.
0769BA8E-6299-4EC7-BF47-896613D5E7C1.jpeg
756D7457-5EA5-4BCA-AED2-684C1CD71E2C.jpeg
 

Yokel

LE
HMS Belfast is back on public display - I must apologise for missing this at the time.

The veteran cruiser – the last reminder of an era when guns were the Royal Navy’s principal weapon – has completed a 15-month refit on the Thames.

The ship – which celebrates 50 years as a floating museum in London on Trafalgar Day – hasn’t welcomed a single tourist aboard since March last year and the first days of the first lockdown.

Curators, historians and conservation experts have used the enforced closure to bring forward their ten-year plan to overhaul the cruiser and significantly improve the visitor experience.
 

Nemesis44UK

LE
Book Reviewer
The LCT in Southsea is hugely impressive. Saw it a couple of weeks ago. They've done a sterling job of the restoration.
 

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