Law Enforcement in the Peoples "Republic" of China

#8
Are you saying it's a good thing to be investigated thoroughly after a shooting or that it's a waste of time?
I think it is a good thing but not with a presumption the cop did something wrong. My point (tongue in cheek) about the Chinese situation was that under a totalitarian regime there will be no investigation.
 
#9
I wonder how long she was suspended from duty while(st) the internal affairs squad investigated the shooting? In America, especially if the perp was a minority, the cop would be on tinterhooks for the follow up shots.
Not for long would be my guess. The incident's being dissected on the internet and nowhere so thoroughly than blogs from westerners in China. Oddly, Chinese internet opinion seems to be as finely divided as on a western board which is strange because the aftermath of shooting a perp is normally one of the few time the police don't get pelters.
 
#10
I think it's also much less likely to happen in a developing nation, whatever their system of government. With increasing international importance of China it's easy to forget that their per capita GDP is about 1/15th of that of the U.S
 
#11
I think it's also much less likely to happen in a developing nation, whatever their system of government. With increasing international importance of China it's easy to forget that their per capita GDP is about 1/15th of that of the U.S
It seems easier to forget that it is a totalitarian and brutal regime.
 
#12
I think it is a good thing but not with a presumption the cop did something wrong. My point (tongue in cheek) about the Chinese situation was that under a totalitarian regime there will be no investigation.
The PRC lacks some of the defining characteristics of a totalitarian regime. Authoritarian, definitely. Totalitarian, no.

There normally are investigations but they're conducted behind closed doors and without outside scrutiny - in stark contrast to the actual events, as we saw from the closeness of the camera team.
 
#13
The PRC lacks some of the defining characteristics of a totalitarian regime. Authoritarian, definitely. Totalitarian, no.

There normally are investigations but they're conducted behind closed doors and without outside scrutiny - in stark contrast to the actual events, as we saw from the closeness of the camera team.
We differ then.
 
#14
Just do not try to odge a formal petition of complaint

Chinese police beat official's wife by mistake

"Chinese commentators have called for better treatment of petitioners after police beat the wife of a high-ranking law enforcement official, reportedly mistaking her for a complainant.

According to Chinese media, the party chief of the local police bureau told her afterwards: "This incident is a total misunderstanding. Our police officers never realised that they beat the wife of a senior leader."

The comment sparked outrage, with one person reportedly responding: "Does it mean the police are not supposed to beat leaders' wives, but that the ordinary people can be battered?"

Chen Yulian, from Hubei province in central China, was knocked to the ground and beaten for more than 15 minutes by plain-clothed officers, a report in the Southern Metropolis Daily said. The 58-year-old had been trying to enter a provincial office building in Wuhan to meet an official.

The paper said six unidentified men rushed out of the gate and began pummelling her. They were later identified as public security officers who had allegedly been assigned to "subdue" petitioners."

Chinese police beat official's wife by mistake | World news | guardian.co.uk
 
#16
Just do not try to odge a formal petition of complaint
Or blow the whistle on an incompetent boss. Gao Chun, the lad who grassed up the late and unlamented Zheng Xiaoyu, has been regularly assaulted by staff from the provincial petitions office. Perhaps not surprisingly, the local cops are nowhere to be seen.
 
#17
It seems easier to forget that it is a totalitarian and brutal regime.
I don't think anyone's forgotten that China isn't a democratic country. But I don't think it's realistic to hold today's China to the same standards as you would hold your own nation. According to the CIA world factbook figures of GDP per capita, it falls between Namibia and Turkmenistan. I know which of those three I would rather live in.
 
#18
Fair enough, what's your definition of totalitarian?
as one might expect there are many definitions depending on the spin of the proponent etc. and variations (neo-totalitarianism etc.) but in the context of the PRC I ascribe a good deal to the views of Prof. Sujian Guo, Sujian Guo's Home Page who has written a good deal on this. Here is the conclusion from his book Post-Mao China: From Totalitarianism to Authoritarianism? (Post-Mao China: From Totalitarianism to Authoritarianism? ):


The End or Continuity of Communist Totalitarianism?

This work has argued that the complex components in the syndrome of traits of
a political regime should be classified into two levels: a fundamental level or
dynamic core, and an operative level or action means. By using Lakatos research
programs and Collier and Mahon's work on categorization, a macro model of
real-world totalitarianism has been theoretically refined and graphically
illustrated to define and distinguish the "hard core" features of totalitarianism
from other operative features. The refined totalitarian model serves
theoretical criteria or reference points which can be used to define what
constitutes the hard core of a totalitarian regime in theoretical and comparative
terms, examine what has changed or what has not between now and then, and
explain what features of the totalitarian "syndrome" the regime can lose and still
be totalitarian, or what degree of ideological, political, legal, social, and
economic changes can occur and still leave the old regime's identity essentially
unaffected. Philosophical absolutism, inevitable goals, official ideology, and the
single-party dictatorship are the most fundamental "hard core" features that
account for the origins, dynamics, and essence of Chinese communist
totalitarianism, while the "action means" or operative features largely account
for the functioning of Chinese communist totalitarianism. The fundamental and
core features of the model must always be there if the nature of totalitarianism is
to be sustained; otherwise, it would have been transformed into something else.
But the operative features are changeable, as they have been applied selectively
and in varying degrees, and will not have a decisive effect on the nature of a
totalitarian regime. In other words, the operative features serve as its "protective
belt" or a life belt, keeping the "hard core" afloat on an ocean of anomalies. As
long as this belt can be adjusted, the totalitarian regime is in no danger of
sinking. A change in the operative features does not mean that the regime is
more or less totalitarian because it occurs at the operative level and affects the
elements not fundamental to the regime.​
 
#19
I don't think anyone's forgotten that China isn't a democratic country. But I don't think it's realistic to hold today's China to the same standards as you would hold your own nation. According to the CIA world factbook figures of GDP per capita, it falls between Namibia and Turkmenistan. I know which of those three I would rather live in.
You seem to be missing my point--in the western world's (largely the US) frenzied quest for more money to fuel its extravagant and profligate spending, we seem all to willing to ignore or spin away the fact that the ruling elite of China continues to be, in spite of all the efforts to cast it differently, a brutal regime that cares precious little about individual rights or freedoms. Am I the only one who remembers (for what it actually was) Tian'anmen Square for example?
 
#20
My take on the P.R.C. and it's treatment has been challenged by reading 'Prisoner 13498' written by Robert H. Davies ,which I think was meant to elicit sympathy for the ordeal he suffered.Actually I finished thinking "what an ********,he deserved all he got",and what a different perspective on the P.R.C.'s legal and penal system,they really came across as reasonable and in places seemed to actually be trying to reform as well as punish (no doubt he got a better deal as a 'foreigner' but I truly was suprised.
 

Latest Threads

New Posts