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Lathes, welder etc

endure

GCM
Not necessarily wrong, it gave me a very good grounding for the rest of life. One lesson I learned quickly was that if everyone else in the room can't be trusted to hold a blunt pencil then doing what I was told got me a lot of latitude to do basically whatever I wanted.

I spent a very pleasant couple of years planing plywood for my coursework and handed absolutely nothing in, causing several conversations about how the coursework was 60% of the final grade, I couldn't hope to pass etc. As it turned out the exam was written so the mongs who tried to eat screwdrivers could pass (sample question - name a non-ferrous metal) and smartarse here got nearly full marks so still scraped a C grade.


I arrived back in the UK from Oz when I was 14 - halfway through secondary school where I managed to blag my way into one of the local grammars.

When I attended my first woodwork lesson and the teacher told me to pick something I wanted to make and do a drawing of it I just did a freehand drawing. I'd never heard of technical drawing with dimensions etc.

After being shouted at for 5 minutes I was cast off into a corner to make a small table top bookstand.

It took me 3 years to make and I was really pleased with myself until I put a couple of books on it and it fell apart.
 

anglo

LE
My father had a peddle driven wood lathe, basically it was two sewing machine treadles
back to back, my brother and I peddled the frecker, whilst my dad did the turning,
 
I arrived back in the UK from Oz when I was 14 - halfway through secondary school where I managed to blag my way into one of the local grammars.

When I attended my first woodwork lesson and the teacher told me to pick something I wanted to make and do a drawing of it I just did a freehand drawing. I'd never heard of technical drawing with dimensions etc.

After being shouted at for 5 minutes I was cast off into a corner to make a small table top bookstand.

It took me 3 years to make and I was really pleased with myself until I put a couple of books on it and it fell apart.

You've reminded me of something:

IMG_1681.JPG


This is a magazine rack that my late uncle made when he was a nipper at school. He was my Mum's twin, and she's 72 next month, so this must be about 60 years old. It was in my grandparents' house when I was a kid. My grandfather was a magazine circulation manager, so it always had loads of current magazines in it.

When my grandma died, long after my grandpa, Mum asked if I wanted anything from the house, and this was one of them. It's not worth a light, it's made of 1/2" plywood, and is 60 years old, but that thing has stood the test of time, and has made its way from Glossop Derbyshire to Tennessee, and reminds me of my grandparents every now and again.
 

endure

GCM
You've reminded me of something:

View attachment 508401

This is a magazine rack that my late uncle made when he was a nipper at school. He was my Mum's twin, and she's 72 next month, so this must be about 60 years old. It was in my grandparents' house when I was a kid. My grandfather was a magazine circulation manager, so it always had loads of current magazines in it.

When my grandma died, long after my grandpa, Mum asked if I wanted anything from the house, and this was one of them. It's not worth a light, it's made of 1/2" plywood, and is 60 years old, but that thing has stood the test of time, and has made its way from Glossop Derbyshire to Tennessee, and reminds me of my grandparents every now and again.


So you're from Derbyshire then? That explains a lot ;-)

As for that magnificent 60 year old sturdy magazine rack - you're dead to me...
 
So you're from Derbyshire then? That explains a lot ;-)

As for that magnificent 60 year old sturdy magazine rack - you're dead to me...

No, my Mum's side of the family are from Derbyshire. I'm from Cheshire. I did live in Glossop for a year or so at 18/19, but that was it. Arrse end of nowhere, shit roads in and out, but did at least have 50-odd boozers at the time.
 
Happy days, how we laughed when our metal work teacher was going through the files, rats tail, and this children is the bastard file.
Next week, oh “John pass me the bastard file will you,“
“sure which one?

“THE BASTARD FILE” So childish but we were children.

I think our metal work teacher was a peadophile....
 
Frankly anything that's not done using glassware, a top pan balance or fire isn't worth bothering with. Bunch of brown coated greasemonkeys ;)

I did like the furnace, blowtorches and aluminium casting.
I spent a little time teaching science, but wasn’t allowed to use a Bunsen burner (not trained/insured/other crap), so I used my oxy-acetylene kit instead...
 
I really should do something with this. It’s an old pedal driven Myford that my Grandad had in his garage years ago. I need to attach the lathe to the bed and take off the tape and other clutter as well as fully recommission it. I also have a 4 jaw chuck so items could be mounted off centre. I have only made small things like a cannon you’d see on Victory. My Grandad made a 3 1/2” gauge railway loco on it. The only things he bought were the wheels, which were cast and needed finishing and the pressure gauge.


RP.
751F8A72-3F42-4B1D-9D7E-3D81A7920317.jpeg
 
Not necessarily wrong, it gave me a very good grounding for the rest of life. One lesson I learned quickly was that if everyone else in the room can't be trusted to hold a blunt pencil then doing what I was told got me a lot of latitude to do basically whatever I wanted.

I spent a very pleasant couple of years planing plywood for my coursework and handed absolutely nothing in, causing several conversations about how the coursework was 60% of the final grade, I couldn't hope to pass etc. As it turned out the exam was written so the mongs who tried to eat screwdrivers could pass (sample question - name a non-ferrous metal) and smartarse here got nearly full marks so still scraped a C grade.
In my 'O' Level Engineering Workshop Theory and Practice (Metalwork), one of the exam questions was drawing a block diagram of a Bessemer Convertor. I had revised so I could. Another one was a colour chart from which you had to identify the correct colour for heating metals for particular processes, which I couldn't.

I also didn't know that you couldn't use a metal lathe for wood. You learn something every day.
 
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I also didn't know that you couldn't use a metal lathe for wood. You learn something every day.

“Can’t” is a bit strong. It’s more “shouldn’t”, it is the wrong tool.

Metal lathes generally are dirty, oily things, with the lubrication oil. If you then turned wood on it, your chips will form a horrid oily substance that will get in the threads and seals of the machine. Metal swarf doesn’t, because it doesn’t absorb the oil. There are also design differences. The swing on even a basic wood lathe will often be 12 or 14”, a 12” metal lathe will be an enormous thing, because to turn a 12” cylinder of steel against a cutter requires a lot of torque. The tool post on a metal lathe is not at all suited to levering an 18” long chisel against, whereas a wood lathe banjo is specifically designed for that. The speed ranges are all different too.

My wood lathe is a 1948 Delta 1460 (14” swing, 60” bed) and actually there was a metal-working tool post accessory for it, but it’d be a piss poor metal lathe. Doesn’t have a threaded interlock with the drive, so you couldn’t knurl or cut threads, but it would turn down a metal rod into a smaller rod.

Right tool for the right job.
 

HE117

LE
Wood working and metal working do not really mix.. Sawdust and oil is not a good combination and the whole approach is different. Metal working is a tool intensive activity, and you spend most of your time setting up a job and clearing it down later. You need a workshop that is capable of storing a large number of tools in a way that they do not get lost and you can access them quickly. I would dispute that metal working is any dirtier than wood working, however working metal requires much more lubrication, both to assist the processes and to keep the rust faeries at bay and as a result most surfaces are covered with (clean!) oil.

Wood working uses a smaller number of more general purpose tools and does not need quite so much power, although what is worked on in the home workshop tends to be larger. The main difference between the activities is that wood working creates dust which distributes itself across the workshop, and gets everywhere. Modern woodworking tools such as saws and sanders produce huge quantities of the stuff, which is both flammable and can do damage to your lungs..!

When I am doing work on guns, I end up having to do both activities in the same place, which is not ideal. I try not to do power sanding of wood, but it takes me at least a day to clean down the shop after working on a stock! All my metalwork machines have dust covers which stay on when they are not in use although it makes the workshop a bit Haversham like...!
 

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