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Lathes, welder etc

The toolpost and guard: not fitted to wood lathes. In the old days, D&T would have examples you could look at...
I'll have a look next time I'm down the dark side.

We had several big lathes at school when I was a nipper but they were all metal lathes. Didn't stop us butchering bits of pine dowel or trying to sharpen pencils on them.
 
How can you tell it's a metal lathe rather than a wood lathe? Not a wah, I'm assuming it's something to do with the cutting tools or diameters specified but no idea what I'm looking for.

Easy. I did both woodwork and metalwork at school :)

More seriously, a metal lathe typically has a lot more knobs and twiddly bits to work the piece, such as automatic/interlocked feed, so you can cut threads and knurl etc. The cutters are bolted into the machine and you manipulate the hand wheels to get the cut you want. At least for a manual lathe.

A wood lathe is typically entirely manual, other than the speed setting (which can also be manual). The tools are hand-held chisels, not bolted-in cutters. In general, they are less-sophisticated machines. They can still be very large, but don't need the complexity of a metal lathe. You don't want to use a metal lathe for wood, because the shavings will get covered in oil and fvck it up.

You don't want to use a wood lathe for metal because you can't bolt the cutter onto the holder (called a banjo on a wood lathe), and they spin too slowly in general for metal.
 
You don't want to use a metal lathe for wood, because the shavings will get covered in oil and fvck it up.
No one told us that. Although given the poor bugger in charge of the class was mostly preoccupied with people belt sanding pencilcases or threatening to use chisels as offensive weapons I think I can forgive him that minor omission.

He did snap one day and ranted at us for a good 5 minutes straight, culminating with "The bright boys do electronics, the girls do food or sewing, the arty kids do graphics and I get stuck with you lot!". With the benefit of experience on the other side of the classroom it must have taken a lot of self control not to change that last bit to "you bunch of mental cnuts".
 
No one told us that. Although given the poor bugger in charge of the class was mostly preoccupied with people belt sanding pencilcases or threatening to use chisels as offensive weapons I think I can forgive him that minor omission.

He did snap one day and ranted at us for a good 5 minutes straight, culminating with "The bright boys do electronics, the girls do food or sewing, the arty kids do graphics and I get stuck with you lot!". With the benefit of experience on the other side of the classroom it must have taken a lot of self control not to change that last bit to "you bunch of mental cnuts".

I see where you went wrong. You went to a co-ed. :)
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
No one told us that. Although given the poor bugger in charge of the class was mostly preoccupied with people belt sanding pencilcases or threatening to use chisels as offensive weapons I think I can forgive him that minor omission.

He did snap one day and ranted at us for a good 5 minutes straight, culminating with "The bright boys do electronics, the girls do food or sewing, the arty kids do graphics and I get stuck with you lot!". With the benefit of experience on the other side of the classroom it must have taken a lot of self control not to change that last bit to "you bunch of mental cnuts".
Only threatened, our woodwork teacher did, a big fat bar steward so he was, very accuarate he could have been in the circus the twat.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
I see where you went wrong. You went to a co-ed. :)
Not necessarily wrong, it gave me a very good grounding for the rest of life. One lesson I learned quickly was that if everyone else in the room can't be trusted to hold a blunt pencil then doing what I was told got me a lot of latitude to do basically whatever I wanted.

I spent a very pleasant couple of years planing plywood for my coursework and handed absolutely nothing in, causing several conversations about how the coursework was 60% of the final grade, I couldn't hope to pass etc. As it turned out the exam was written so the mongs who tried to eat screwdrivers could pass (sample question - name a non-ferrous metal) and smartarse here got nearly full marks so still scraped a C grade.
 
Not necessarily wrong, it gave me a very good grounding for the rest of life. One lesson I learned quickly was that if everyone else in the room can't be trusted to hold a blunt pencil then doing what I was told got me a lot of latitude to do basically whatever I wanted.

I spent a very pleasant couple of years planing plywood for my coursework and handed absolutely nothing in, causing several conversations about how the coursework was 60% of the final grade, I couldn't hope to pass etc. As it turned out the exam was written so the mongs who tried to eat screwdrivers could pass (sample question - name a non-ferrous metal) and smartarse here got near full marks so still scraped a C grade.

Clearly not, if you can't tell a wood lathe from a metal lathe :)

But absolutely agreed on the rest of it, particularly the latitude you got by doing what was expected. It was a bit harder to do that in my school, as it was selective. Any residual tossers that made it through the 11+ didn't make it to the O-Level years, they were weeded out in the first couple of years. Only a few, but the vast majority wanted to be there and do well.

Your lesson about getting latitude was particularly true in the Army. There was always a shit-magnet that couldn't put his uniform on correctly, or got more wankered more often than the rest, or spunked all their money on millionaires weekend (quite literally, sometimes), couldn't pay for insurance, but still drove. Or all of those. Fvcking marvellous, thought I :)
 
No one told us that. Although given the poor bugger in charge of the class was mostly preoccupied with people belt sanding pencilcases or threatening to use chisels as offensive weapons I think I can forgive him that minor omission.

He did snap one day and ranted at us for a good 5 minutes straight, culminating with "The bright boys do electronics, the girls do food or sewing, the arty kids do graphics and I get stuck with you lot!". With the benefit of experience on the other side of the classroom it must have taken a lot of self control not to change that last bit to "you bunch of mental cnuts".
Common practice to send the scunners downstairs (D&T was always on the ground floor due to the difficulty of getting machinery upstairs) to “give them something to do with their hands”. One such oaf (as broad as he was thick) decided to wave a chisel at me, the double take as he realised that the chisel in my hand was the one he had been holding milliseconds ago was priceless... “are you some kind of Ninja?” He asks, “No........but the guys who trained me were...”
No further hassle from that mob... :)
 

HE117

LE
How can you tell it's a metal lathe rather than a wood lathe? Not a wah, I'm assuming it's something to do with the cutting tools or diameters specified but no idea what I'm looking for.
Metal lathes are generally much chunkier than wood ones, but the main difference is that it invariably has a carriage that holds the tool. A wood lathe only has a tool rest and the tools are hand held. A wood lathe is not that much more than a motor head and a tailpiece connected by some sort of bed.

The other vital feature of the vast majority of metal lathes is the presence of a long screw which moves the tool carriage up and down the bed in a controlled manner. This was invented by Henry Maudsley in the 1790s and was one of the main breakthroughs of the industrial revolution. The screw lathe not only made it easy to accurately turn parallel objects with a high surface finish, but also create accurate screw threads. It vastly increased the speed and accuracy of metalwork and required far less skill than previous methods.

The Screw Lathe is the Queen of the metal workshop, and can be used to complete almost all aspects of metal forming.
 
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Clearly not, if you can't tell a wood lathe from a metal lathe :)
Frankly anything that's not done using glassware, a top pan balance or fire isn't worth bothering with. Bunch of brown coated greasemonkeys ;)

I did like the furnace, blowtorches and aluminium casting.
 

HE117

LE
The Stepdaughter has cluttering up her house, now her dad has shuffled off this mortal coil, a Lathe that's hardly been used and all the bits for it, an engine hoist and a Welder (dunno if it's mig or tig tbh)

She's looking at around 2K for the lot.

I'll try and attach pics of the lathe.

View attachment 508318View attachment 508322
Looks like a WM 240... they are about £1500 new..

Don't know what the welder or engine hoist is, but probably about £400 each.. I think £2K is a bit wishful! These are all Chinese made, and do not hold the same secondhand values as older UK kit like Myfords or Boxfords..

Have a look here, and maybe put in an ad for a month or so.. stuff gets shifted pretty quickly..

www.lathes.co.uk
 
Easy. I did both woodwork and metalwork at school :)

More seriously, a metal lathe typically has a lot more knobs and twiddly bits to work the piece, such as automatic/interlocked feed, so you can cut threads and knurl etc. The cutters are bolted into the machine and you manipulate the hand wheels to get the cut you want. At least for a manual lathe.

A wood lathe is typically entirely manual, other than the speed setting (which can also be manual). The tools are hand-held chisels, not bolted-in cutters. In general, they are less-sophisticated machines. They can still be very large, but don't need the complexity of a metal lathe. You don't want to use a metal lathe for wood, because the shavings will get covered in oil and fvck it up.

You don't want to use a wood lathe for metal because you can't bolt the cutter onto the holder (called a banjo on a wood lathe), and they spin too slowly in general for metal.

I used to enjoy a good knurl.

I'm actually at a client site this week and the engineering workshop is full of toys I could quite happily spend hours on. I'd be turning metal into swarf and ending up with nothing useful though

The actual factory makes interesting pyrotechnics - the smoke and phos' kind. Amongst others.

And no, they won't let me make my own super phos' grenades.
 
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Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Not necessarily wrong, it gave me a very good grounding for the rest of life. One lesson I learned quickly was that if everyone else in the room can't be trusted to hold a blunt pencil then doing what I was told got me a lot of latitude to do basically whatever I wanted.

I spent a very pleasant couple of years planing plywood for my coursework and handed absolutely nothing in, causing several conversations about how the coursework was 60% of the final grade, I couldn't hope to pass etc. As it turned out the exam was written so the mongs who tried to eat screwdrivers could pass (sample question - name a non-ferrous metal) and smartarse here got nearly full marks so still scraped a C grade.
Happy days, how we laughed when our metal work teacher was going through the files, rats tail, and this children is the bastard file.
Next week, oh “John pass me the bastard file will you,“
“sure which one?

“THE BASTARD FILE” So childish but we were children.
 
Its a nice home workshop lathe , you could do a lot on it .

Advertise for small turning jobs and get your money back in 12 months. ( providing you know how to use it )

Let's see the welder , if he's Spunked 1500 on a lathe it might be a good un ?
 

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