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Latest snowflake outrage

Not much point in a card twice the size of the others, it's going to be a bit obvious if you've got Abbott in your hand.

Unlike Corbyn who managed to get his hand in Abbott.
Oooo, you is going ta hell! :D
 
I have got a deck of cards with members of Saddam's heirarchy on it. Various government ministers, military leaders, party officials etc. How about someone doing a deck with well known Nazis, communists, African dictators and Islamic dictators replacing the four normal suits?
 
Torygraph.

I dispair

Chaucer courses to be replaced by modules on race and sexuality under University of Leicester plans​

Beowulf and The Canterbury tales could be sidelined under plans for the English department

ByCraig Simpson20 January 2021 • 9:00pm

Geoffrey Chaucer's works will no longer be taught under new proposals

Geoffrey Chaucer's works will no longer be taught under new proposals
The University of Leicester will stop teaching Geoffrey Chaucer's work and other medieval literature in favour of modules on race and sexuality, according to new proposals.

Management told the English department that courses on canonical works will be dropped for modules “students expect” as part of plans now under consultation.

Foundational texts like The Canterbury Tales and Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf would no longer be taught under proposals to scrap medieval literature.
Instead the English faculty will be refocused to drop centuries of the literary canon and deliver a “decolonised” curriculum devoted to diversity.

Academics now facing redundancy were told via email: “The aim of our proposals (is) to offer a suite of undergraduate degrees that provide modules which students expect of an English degree.”
New modules described as “excitingly innovative” would cover: “A chronological literary history, a selection of modules on race, ethnicity, sexuality and diversity, a decolonised curriculum, and new employability modules.”

Professors were told that to facilitate change management planned to stop all English Language courses, cease medieval literature, and reduce Early Modern Literature offerings.
It was claimed that this would “refocus and strengthen” the department.
Despite Chaucer’s position as “the father of English literature” the 14th century figure will no longer be taught if plans currently under consultation go ahead.

They would end all teaching on texts central to the development of the English language, including the Dark Age epic poem Beowulf, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.
Sir Thomas Malory's Morte D'Arthur, the Viking sagas, and all works written earlier than 1500 would also be removed from the syllabus.

Cuts to Early Modern English modules could see texts John Milton’s Paradise Lost omitted, according to concerned academics, with teaching on Christopher Marlowe and John Donne potentially reduced.
The University of Leicester has said that teaching on William Shakespeare’s work will remain in place.
Staff do not have the same certainty, and were alerted to the change and the threat of redundancies on Monday, with 60 jobs under threat.

Many more roles are likely to be reassigned as specialist subjects are replaced.
Plans for restructuring at the university were announced in 2020, with management seeking to ensure courses were “sustainable” for the next decade of student intake.

President and Vice-Chancellor Professor Nishan Canagarajah said that changing modules was part of the long-term strategy to “compete on a global level”, adding: “To facilitate this, we may need to cease activity in a limited number of areas.”

While teaching on almost 1000 years of the English language and its literature may be subject to cuts, the university has pledged that students will still receive comprehensive education.
A spokeswoman said: “We are currently considering some proposed changes to our English programme and are consulting with staff as part of these discussions.

“The University of Leicester continues to offer students a broad programme of learning at undergraduate level, including a chronological span of English Literature, from Shakespeare to Bernadine Evaristo, alongside thematically-driven and author-driven modules.
“We are committed to the future sustainability of teaching English, and we will continue to work with our staff and our students to deliver this.”

Consultation will begin next week on the future of English faculty roles placed under threat of redundancy.
 
Torygraph.

I dispair

Chaucer courses to be replaced by modules on race and sexuality under University of Leicester plans​

Beowulf and The Canterbury tales could be sidelined under plans for the English department

ByCraig Simpson20 January 2021 • 9:00pm

Geoffrey Chaucer's works will no longer be taught under new proposals's works will no longer be taught under new proposals

Geoffrey Chaucer's works will no longer be taught under new proposals
The University of Leicester will stop teaching Geoffrey Chaucer's work and other medieval literature in favour of modules on race and sexuality, according to new proposals.

Management told the English department that courses on canonical works will be dropped for modules “students expect” as part of plans now under consultation.

Foundational texts like The Canterbury Tales and Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf would no longer be taught under proposals to scrap medieval literature.
Instead the English faculty will be refocused to drop centuries of the literary canon and deliver a “decolonised” curriculum devoted to diversity.

Academics now facing redundancy were told via email: “The aim of our proposals (is) to offer a suite of undergraduate degrees that provide modules which students expect of an English degree.”
New modules described as “excitingly innovative” would cover: “A chronological literary history, a selection of modules on race, ethnicity, sexuality and diversity, a decolonised curriculum, and new employability modules.”

Professors were told that to facilitate change management planned to stop all English Language courses, cease medieval literature, and reduce Early Modern Literature offerings.
It was claimed that this would “refocus and strengthen” the department.
Despite Chaucer’s position as “the father of English literature” the 14th century figure will no longer be taught if plans currently under consultation go ahead.

They would end all teaching on texts central to the development of the English language, including the Dark Age epic poem Beowulf, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.
Sir Thomas Malory's Morte D'Arthur, the Viking sagas, and all works written earlier than 1500 would also be removed from the syllabus.

Cuts to Early Modern English modules could see texts John Milton’s Paradise Lost omitted, according to concerned academics, with teaching on Christopher Marlowe and John Donne potentially reduced.
The University of Leicester has said that teaching on William Shakespeare’s work will remain in place.
Staff do not have the same certainty, and were alerted to the change and the threat of redundancies on Monday, with 60 jobs under threat.

Many more roles are likely to be reassigned as specialist subjects are replaced.
Plans for restructuring at the university were announced in 2020, with management seeking to ensure courses were “sustainable” for the next decade of student intake.

President and Vice-Chancellor Professor Nishan Canagarajah said that changing modules was part of the long-term strategy to “compete on a global level”, adding: “To facilitate this, we may need to cease activity in a limited number of areas.”

While teaching on almost 1000 years of the English language and its literature may be subject to cuts, the university has pledged that students will still receive comprehensive education.
A spokeswoman said: “We are currently considering some proposed changes to our English programme and are consulting with staff as part of these discussions.

“The University of Leicester continues to offer students a broad programme of learning at undergraduate level, including a chronological span of English Literature, from Shakespeare to Bernadine Evaristo, alongside thematically-driven and author-driven modules.
“We are committed to the future sustainability of teaching English, and we will continue to work with our staff and our students to deliver this.”

Consultation will begin next week on the future of English faculty roles placed under threat of redundancy.
OFFS!
 
Torygraph.

I dispair

Chaucer courses to be replaced by modules on race and sexuality under University of Leicester plans​

Beowulf and The Canterbury tales could be sidelined under plans for the English department

ByCraig Simpson20 January 2021 • 9:00pm

Geoffrey Chaucer's works will no longer be taught under new proposals's works will no longer be taught under new proposals

Geoffrey Chaucer's works will no longer be taught under new proposals
The University of Leicester will stop teaching Geoffrey Chaucer's work and other medieval literature in favour of modules on race and sexuality, according to new proposals.

Management told the English department that courses on canonical works will be dropped for modules “students expect” as part of plans now under consultation.

Foundational texts like The Canterbury Tales and Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf would no longer be taught under proposals to scrap medieval literature.
Instead the English faculty will be refocused to drop centuries of the literary canon and deliver a “decolonised” curriculum devoted to diversity.

Academics now facing redundancy were told via email: “The aim of our proposals (is) to offer a suite of undergraduate degrees that provide modules which students expect of an English degree.”
New modules described as “excitingly innovative” would cover: “A chronological literary history, a selection of modules on race, ethnicity, sexuality and diversity, a decolonised curriculum, and new employability modules.”

Professors were told that to facilitate change management planned to stop all English Language courses, cease medieval literature, and reduce Early Modern Literature offerings.
It was claimed that this would “refocus and strengthen” the department.
Despite Chaucer’s position as “the father of English literature” the 14th century figure will no longer be taught if plans currently under consultation go ahead.

They would end all teaching on texts central to the development of the English language, including the Dark Age epic poem Beowulf, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.
Sir Thomas Malory's Morte D'Arthur, the Viking sagas, and all works written earlier than 1500 would also be removed from the syllabus.

Cuts to Early Modern English modules could see texts John Milton’s Paradise Lost omitted, according to concerned academics, with teaching on Christopher Marlowe and John Donne potentially reduced.
The University of Leicester has said that teaching on William Shakespeare’s work will remain in place.
Staff do not have the same certainty, and were alerted to the change and the threat of redundancies on Monday, with 60 jobs under threat.

Many more roles are likely to be reassigned as specialist subjects are replaced.
Plans for restructuring at the university were announced in 2020, with management seeking to ensure courses were “sustainable” for the next decade of student intake.

President and Vice-Chancellor Professor Nishan Canagarajah said that changing modules was part of the long-term strategy to “compete on a global level”, adding: “To facilitate this, we may need to cease activity in a limited number of areas.”

While teaching on almost 1000 years of the English language and its literature may be subject to cuts, the university has pledged that students will still receive comprehensive education.
A spokeswoman said: “We are currently considering some proposed changes to our English programme and are consulting with staff as part of these discussions.

“The University of Leicester continues to offer students a broad programme of learning at undergraduate level, including a chronological span of English Literature, from Shakespeare to Bernadine Evaristo, alongside thematically-driven and author-driven modules.
“We are committed to the future sustainability of teaching English, and we will continue to work with our staff and our students to deliver this.”

Consultation will begin next week on the future of English faculty roles placed under threat of redundancy.
Replace Leicester with Mumbai on Fens and they'll be flocking in.

Nothing better to highlight a seat of learning than dayglo star shaped stickers on the windows, " Degrees, 9000£ only a year."
 
"the university has pledged that students will still receive comprehensive education." Erm - surely the point of a degree is that a student receives a focused, specialist education.

Our kids and their friends were very very aware that they were considered as product, rather than scholars. Degrees have become the new A level - ie the stepping stone to a qualification. With MAs now becoming the workplace 'standard sorter', many kids who start MAs are dropping out of them as they are no longer perceived to be worth the financial investment value. The university marketplace is about to implode - early stages confirmed in conversation some years ago by a friend working in same who habitually looked ahead to the day when Uk students were priced out of participation and that overseas students were no longer arriving to be the fatted calf.......
 

Daz

LE
You should see the ones I brought back from Crete. . . . . or was it Spain?
They were definitely politically and morally incorrect.

Edited to add: If we are going to dick about with playing cards then this is a must.

View attachment 541394
I still have a pack of the NME Cards they gave out. I always thought they missed a trick having Ian Curtis as the Ace of Spades instead of Lemmy. Other Aces were Jimi, PE, Curt Kobain and Mark E Smith was the Joker.


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Torygraph.

I dispair

Chaucer courses to be replaced by modules on race and sexuality under University of Leicester plans​

Beowulf and The Canterbury tales could be sidelined under plans for the English department

ByCraig Simpson20 January 2021 • 9:00pm

Geoffrey Chaucer's works will no longer be taught under new proposals's works will no longer be taught under new proposals

Geoffrey Chaucer's works will no longer be taught under new proposals
The University of Leicester will stop teaching Geoffrey Chaucer's work and other medieval literature in favour of modules on race and sexuality, according to new proposals.

Management told the English department that courses on canonical works will be dropped for modules “students expect” as part of plans now under consultation.

Foundational texts like The Canterbury Tales and Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf would no longer be taught under proposals to scrap medieval literature.
Instead the English faculty will be refocused to drop centuries of the literary canon and deliver a “decolonised” curriculum devoted to diversity.

Academics now facing redundancy were told via email: “The aim of our proposals (is) to offer a suite of undergraduate degrees that provide modules which students expect of an English degree.”
New modules described as “excitingly innovative” would cover: “A chronological literary history, a selection of modules on race, ethnicity, sexuality and diversity, a decolonised curriculum, and new employability modules.”

Professors were told that to facilitate change management planned to stop all English Language courses, cease medieval literature, and reduce Early Modern Literature offerings.
It was claimed that this would “refocus and strengthen” the department.
Despite Chaucer’s position as “the father of English literature” the 14th century figure will no longer be taught if plans currently under consultation go ahead.

They would end all teaching on texts central to the development of the English language, including the Dark Age epic poem Beowulf, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.
Sir Thomas Malory's Morte D'Arthur, the Viking sagas, and all works written earlier than 1500 would also be removed from the syllabus.

Cuts to Early Modern English modules could see texts John Milton’s Paradise Lost omitted, according to concerned academics, with teaching on Christopher Marlowe and John Donne potentially reduced.
The University of Leicester has said that teaching on William Shakespeare’s work will remain in place.
Staff do not have the same certainty, and were alerted to the change and the threat of redundancies on Monday, with 60 jobs under threat.

Many more roles are likely to be reassigned as specialist subjects are replaced.
Plans for restructuring at the university were announced in 2020, with management seeking to ensure courses were “sustainable” for the next decade of student intake.

President and Vice-Chancellor Professor Nishan Canagarajah said that changing modules was part of the long-term strategy to “compete on a global level”, adding: “To facilitate this, we may need to cease activity in a limited number of areas.”

While teaching on almost 1000 years of the English language and its literature may be subject to cuts, the university has pledged that students will still receive comprehensive education.
A spokeswoman said: “We are currently considering some proposed changes to our English programme and are consulting with staff as part of these discussions.

“The University of Leicester continues to offer students a broad programme of learning at undergraduate level, including a chronological span of English Literature, from Shakespeare to Bernadine Evaristo, alongside thematically-driven and author-driven modules.
“We are committed to the future sustainability of teaching English, and we will continue to work with our staff and our students to deliver this.”

Consultation will begin next week on the future of English faculty roles placed under threat of redundancy.

Can't be long before they include a module on drill rap to appear edgy
 

Fabius Maximus

Old-Salt
Maybe I'm being a snowflake, I don't know.

My wife decided we were to watch some 'period drama' on Netflix the other evening; Bridgerton.

It proved be highly educational, apparently set in the Georgian era, the Queen was of mixed race, one of the Dukes was as well. The number of black, Indian and other Asians in the aristocracy was astounding, who knew?
It’s true - we’ve been a multi-ethnic country for ages. Here’s a fun fact - did you know William the Conqueror was black?
 

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