Latest snowflake outrage

Another little bit of history, and a potential link to an historical figure, set to disappear, although you do have to wonder if they realized which century they were in when it was renamed the last time.

'One of Kent's largest brewers has announced it will rename one of its pubs in Sevenoaks in light of the recent global anti-racism protests.

'Shepherd Neame says The Black Boy on Bank Street will soon become The Restoration, a name which instead focuses on its links to King Charles II. The Faversham-based brewer made the decision saying its current name could be seen as unwelcoming to some of its customers. In a statement on its website, the brewer said: "Shepherd Neame is committed to equality and diversity in every area of its business, and strives to create inclusive, welcoming pub environments for all customers to enjoy. After much deliberation, we have decided to seek consent from relevant authorities to change the name and provide new signage for The Black Boy in Sevenoaks. It was not a decision taken lightly, but we recognise that its current name is not potentially welcoming for all customers, and feel that it is the right thing to do. In order to reflect the pub’s long history, we have chosen to focus on its potential connection with King Charles II, and are therefore proposing to rename it The Restoration."

'This is not the first time the town centre pub has had a name change. In previous years it has been known as Evergreens and the Bank Street Brasserie. Shepherd Neame says the pub, which is one of the most historic in Kent, dates back to 1616 with some suggesting it was named after John Morockoe who worked at nearby Knole country house during the reign of James I.

'The statement continued to say there are several other Black Boy pubs in the UK and many theories around where their names came. Some say it could be linked to coal mining or chimney sweeps, or the nickname given to King Charles II due to his dark-hued skin and exile during Cromwell’s reign. It is believed that a number of pubs changed their name to The Black Boy to show their allegiance.'


 
It would be nice to see some evidence of it with some very detailed explanation on how exactly it violated any human rights law. Seriously. If there is a flaw in the system, then that system needs improvement, but throwing it all out won't help.
In my experience things are often stopped because the fear they might breach anti-discrimination, human rights or health & safety legislation rather than because they do.
 
Another little bit of history, and a potential link to an historical figure, set to disappear, although you do have to wonder if they realized which century they were in when it was renamed the last time.

'One of Kent's largest brewers has announced it will rename one of its pubs in Sevenoaks in light of the recent global anti-racism protests.

'Shepherd Neame says The Black Boy on Bank Street will soon become The Restoration, a name which instead focuses on its links to King Charles II. The Faversham-based brewer made the decision saying its current name could be seen as unwelcoming to some of its customers. In a statement on its website, the brewer said: "Shepherd Neame is committed to equality and diversity in every area of its business, and strives to create inclusive, welcoming pub environments for all customers to enjoy. After much deliberation, we have decided to seek consent from relevant authorities to change the name and provide new signage for The Black Boy in Sevenoaks. It was not a decision taken lightly, but we recognise that its current name is not potentially welcoming for all customers, and feel that it is the right thing to do. In order to reflect the pub’s long history, we have chosen to focus on its potential connection with King Charles II, and are therefore proposing to rename it The Restoration."

'This is not the first time the town centre pub has had a name change. In previous years it has been known as Evergreens and the Bank Street Brasserie. Shepherd Neame says the pub, which is one of the most historic in Kent, dates back to 1616 with some suggesting it was named after John Morockoe who worked at nearby Knole country house during the reign of James I.

'The statement continued to say there are several other Black Boy pubs in the UK and many theories around where their names came. Some say it could be linked to coal mining or chimney sweeps, or the nickname given to King Charles II due to his dark-hued skin and exile during Cromwell’s reign. It is believed that a number of pubs changed their name to The Black Boy to show their allegiance.'


Can anyone from the north east tell me if this Newcastle city centre pub has escaped the BLM outrage?
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Karamoja

War Hero
Another little bit of history, and a potential link to an historical figure, set to disappear, although you do have to wonder if they realized which century they were in when it was renamed the last time.

'One of Kent's largest brewers has announced it will rename one of its pubs in Sevenoaks in light of the recent global anti-racism protests.

'Shepherd Neame says The Black Boy on Bank Street will soon become The Restoration, a name which instead focuses on its links to King Charles II. The Faversham-based brewer made the decision saying its current name could be seen as unwelcoming to some of its customers. In a statement on its website, the brewer said: "Shepherd Neame is committed to equality and diversity in every area of its business, and strives to create inclusive, welcoming pub environments for all customers to enjoy. After much deliberation, we have decided to seek consent from relevant authorities to change the name and provide new signage for The Black Boy in Sevenoaks. It was not a decision taken lightly, but we recognise that its current name is not potentially welcoming for all customers, and feel that it is the right thing to do. In order to reflect the pub’s long history, we have chosen to focus on its potential connection with King Charles II, and are therefore proposing to rename it The Restoration."

'This is not the first time the town centre pub has had a name change. In previous years it has been known as Evergreens and the Bank Street Brasserie. Shepherd Neame says the pub, which is one of the most historic in Kent, dates back to 1616 with some suggesting it was named after John Morockoe who worked at nearby Knole country house during the reign of James I.

'The statement continued to say there are several other Black Boy pubs in the UK and many theories around where their names came. Some say it could be linked to coal mining or chimney sweeps, or the nickname given to King Charles II due to his dark-hued skin and exile during Cromwell’s reign. It is believed that a number of pubs changed their name to The Black Boy to show their allegiance.'


Reminds me of a pub in the Midlands that had to change it's name after two schoolgirls complained probably twenty years ago. It showed a white woman scrubbing a little black boy in a tub. The pub was called "The work in vain".
 
Seems to be a bit of it about..



someone doesn't know the difference between ploughing and sowing....
 

Teg61

Crow
There seems to be similar complaints about the Black Boy Inn in Caernarfon. My Daughter lives down there and says locals are fighting to save the pub name.
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There seems to be similar complaints about the Black Boy Inn in Caernarfon. My Daughter lives down there and says locals are fighting to save the pub name. View attachment 486107
I imagine the locals are more upset that the pubs signage is all in English
 
I don't see the reasoning behind these companies decisions to make significant changes like renaming brands just because a tiny minority has complained, what do they think will happen if they don't ?

Anyone that invents offence about this kind of nonsense is never going to be satisfied anyway.
 
I can often be found here on Saturday nights. Feel free to buy me a pint and fix me up with some top totty. There is an upstairs bar/function room called the All Seeing Eye. Maybe they will put some Blood & Honour gigs on.
The Blackie Boy used to be on the weekend circuit when my pals and I used to drink in the Toon.
I haven't been out in Newcastle for many years, and remember looking for The Lowther and the Adelaide and being told "where have you been for the last 10 years?" as they were no more.
Is Rosie's still there? The Royal Court Grill? I know the Beehive is still going.
 
The Blackie Boy used to be on the weekend circuit when my pals and I used to drink in the Toon.
I haven't been out in Newcastle for many years, and remember looking for The Lowther and the Adelaide and being told "where have you been for the last 10 years?" as they were no more.
Is Rosie's still there? The Royal Court Grill? I know the Beehive is still going.
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Never been in the Lowther, but I think this is where it used to be. Although it has had at least 3 different name changes that I know of. Rosie's is still a main match day boozer. Never heard of the Royal Court, or Adelaide's. Must be a bit before my time up here.
 

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The Royal Court Grill used to be below street level, down a flight of steps in an alley opposite the Bangla Desh restaurant. It was a transvestite bar, and the patter was tremendous. The second last Friday of the month was "Queen of the Month" when all the staff dressed up in their finery and the winner got champagne and kisses from the other competitors. The place used to get packed out.
A bit different for 1972 when we started going!
 
Our village on the Isle of Wight has three pubs - The Dairyman's Daughter, The White Lion and The Fighting Cocks.

I can see potential trouble for all of them when they re-open; the first can be assumed to mean that a daughter belongs to a dairyman (cue feminist outrage), the second has offensive racist overtones and the third offends the animal rights brigade.

And how long before "Wight" gets BLM into a tizzy?

The loonies have surely taken over the asylum. (Whoops, I didn't really mean loonies.........}
 

Also a Labour in Vain in Yarnfield, nr Stone, Staffs. There was an almighty row over the pub sign about 20 years ago. It may have been changed some while back.
I hope it’s still going, I used to drink in there when I came home on leave years ago with my dad and grandad. Grandad used to wash, shave and put on his regimental tie before a few Sunday games of ten pence a knock and fifty pence in the box.
When my girlfriend joined us (she is now Mrs R) he used to say: “you can let go of his hand, dear, ‘e won’t run away. ‘E owes me three quid!”.
I know things move on, but: it’s hard to take sometimes.

ETA: looking at post #9229, that’s the pub.
 
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