Last unexplored places on earth?

#23
Much of the Amazon Jungle. I was with their Army as a visitor thirty odd years ago, and offered helicopter trips into the Jungle to hunt endangered big cats, using their version of our SLRs! WTF! Another world..
The Amazon Jungle is a subject of constant exploration. There is a guy that walk entire length of the Amazon. It took him two years an he just finished his trip this August. He gave a talk in Royal Geographical Society not so while ago which was really interesting.

Ed Stafford | Walking the Amazon
 
#25
Has anyone been to Skipton?
I went one time, thinking I was the first... Took me flag and everything.

Then... Suddenly... From nowhere... Hundreds of old people at the Farmers Market.

'Twas a nightmare.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#26
I think it depends on how you define explored. By Western folk or by indigneous populations?
 

udipur

LE
Book Reviewer
#27
I remember meeting Bruce Parry years ago when he had just got back from his award winning jaunt through PNG with Mark Anstace. He was raving away about how these people had never seen a white man, known what a t-shirt was, were unaware of other peoples... my sarcastic comment about them bloody well doing so now didn't go down too well...

You can bet your bottom dollar that FF's point above is the key issue. Us lordy colonialists think we can save da world wid our missionary zeal in areas where perfectly happy people have been living for hundreds of years.
 

jim24

LE
Book Reviewer
#28
I can remember being given a blank, grid only map with "Lack of relief data" printed on it in Libya, ans another with "Obscured by cloud" in the Falkland Islands,
 
#31
Apparently there are dense unexplored areas of woodland at altitude in the Himalayas, and by dense I mean impossible to move through. The most likely habitat for yetis to live in.
If that was the case, how would the Yetis move through it?
 
#35
Interesting thread. There are dense and remote wooded parts of New Hampshire in the USA which you could get lost in and simply vanish if your not careful. Apparently they find bodies of lost hunters etc all the time out there. Even when a plane comes down it sometimes takes months to find the crash site, so I have read. Now heres the thing. The vast acreage of those woods were once farms and small towns. you can still stumble across drystone walls and old stone house structures etc. the trees reclaimed that land when they all went west in the 1870s (I think !) anyway they went west for better land and opportunity. so, once civilisation now wilderness.

also read of an unknown waterfall located in washington state via satellite image, when after a day long hike through thick brush and forest, the site was reached on foot the waterfall was verified, and right alongside of it was a rusted winch of the type used by loggers in the 1930s. again, undiscovered, but not, if you get my drift.
 
#36
Apparently there are dense unexplored areas of woodland at altitude in the Himalayas, and by dense I mean impossible to move through. The most likely habitat for yetis to live in.

Wasn't there a bbc docu back in the 60s showing yetis in London underground.

Fergus Fleming has done a series of books on exploration good books worth perusing.
 
#38
Wasn't there a bbc docu back in the 60s showing yetis in London underground.

Fergus Fleming has done a series of books on exploration good books worth perusing.
Re London Underground, I think you are getting confused with Quatermass. Anyway they would only occur on the Northern Line
 
#39
The back of the net of any team opposing West Ham Utd.
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads