Last of the Type 42s pays off

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#1
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/last-type-42-destroyer-returns-from-final-deployment

HMS Edinburgh, the Royal Navy's last remaining Type 42 destroyer, returned to Portsmouth from her final deployment last week.



The 30-year-old warship has spent the past 6 months patrolling the Atlantic. She will decommission in June, having clocked up 793,345 miles, as the old Type 42 destroyers make way for the new Type 45s.

Edinburgh left her home port of Portsmouth in September for routine operations across the North and South Atlantic in support of British interests worldwide.

She carried out maritime security operations around the British South Atlantic Islands and supported counter-narcotics efforts off West Africa. She returned home to Portsmouth on 28 March.

The deployment included many exotic goodwill port visits in South Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas.

Edinburgh’s Commanding Officer, Commander Nick Borbone, said:

Returning home after a long period of operations is always a special event and, as the ship’s company is reunited with families and friends after six months away, they can reflect on a job well done and take some well-deserved leave.

However, as this also marks the end of the operational life of the Type 42 destroyer, this deployment has been particularly poignant for all of us on board. I am extremely proud of the way the team in Edinburgh has, through sheer commitment and dedication, upheld the reputation that this exalted class has earned over the past 4 decades and also upheld the reputation of the Royal Navy in the protection of UK interests worldwide.


HMS Edinburgh

Edinburgh was built by Cammell Laird at Birkenhead and launched in April 1983. She was commissioned in December 1985.

Her first deployment was to the Arabian Gulf in 1987, escorting numerous merchant ships safely through the region.

The following year HRH The Duke of York joined as one of the ship’s officers, serving on board during a 6-month round-the-world deployment.

In 1996, Edinburgh rescued the crew of a crippled sailing boat while on patrol in the Gulf. She despatched her Lynx helicopter to rescue all 9 Pakistani crewmen from the vessel after it took on water in stormy conditions and eventually sank.

She took part in the second Gulf War in 2003, supporting Royal Marines ashore and acting as escort to the helicopter carrier HMS Ocean.

The following year, Edinburgh deployed to the Mediterranean and was involved in Operation Active Endeavour, monitoring sea lanes as part of the war on terror.

And, in 2008, during operations in the Gulf she seized a drugs cargo – stashed on board a sailing boat - worth several million pounds.

Edinburgh entered refit in 2010 and spent most of the following year in the South Atlantic before returning there during her final overseas deployment.


Type 42 air defence destroyers have been the backbone of the Royal Navy’s fleet since the first - HMS Sheffield - was commissioned in 1975. Edinburgh was the 14th and final Type 42 to enter service.

The Type 42s are being replaced by a fleet of Type 45 destroyers. HMS Duncan, the sixth and final Type 45 was formally handed over to the Royal Navy by shipbuilder BAE Systems on 22 March 2013
 
#2
So that leaves 3 Type 45s in service... with another still in sea trials. Can sleep safe at night then...
 
#3
What an amazing career....she saved 9 pakistani fishermen and stopped a yacht with some class A on board.

Oh, that was your point!
 
#4
Honking ships but absolutely fantastic ships companies and cracking deployments (south Americas, Caribbean, North America, West And South Africa). Shame to see them go but they've had a good running.


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#6
Merc taxis rack up more miles.
Found a couple of examples (which don't fully support your position) on google:

1. The German-designed Amphicar was a product of the Sixties. A Triumph Herald engine gave 65mph on land and 5.2 knots (6mph) on water. Rust was a problem, apparently. Hmm - similar Qual Control to the Skanky, Pompey rustbuckets then.
2. The Herzog Conte of 1979, an ugly duckling of a car/boat if ever there was one. Looks can be deceptive, however, as it was capable of almost 100mph on tarmac and highly manoeuvrable in water thanks to twin propellors. Twin props.

3. The VW Beetle-based Schwimmwagen was a four-wheel drive, go-anywhere vehicle for the German army whose development was overseen by Ferdinand Porsche. Closest match, with military links - but no missiles/guns.

...but can't find any entries for Mercs. Perhaps Stuttgart is just too far from the 'oggin!
 
#7
Messdecks were more crowded than a migrant house in Hounslow. IIRC HMS Sheffield cost 23million to build and that was more than double the estimate.

Lots packed into a hull the size of a US Knox class frigate. We got our monies worth out of every hull.
 
#8
She hasn't paid off quite yet.

Kromeriz said:
So that leaves 3 Type 45s in service... with another still in sea trials. Can sleep safe at night then...
If only three are in service then how come four have gone on deployments?
 
#9
Messdecks were more crowded than a migrant house in Hounslow. IIRC HMS Sheffield cost 23million to build and that was more than double the estimate.

Lots packed into a hull the size of a US Knox class frigate. We got our monies worth out of every hull.
That's cause they had the kit of a type 82 but half the hull size to fit it in after we lost cvf and got through deck cruisers as we couldn't afford carriers, or AWW cruisers.


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#12
They smell of poo.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
#13
surely its not the last until the last overseas one sinks?
 
#14
There's London Taxis with more than that on the clock.
 
#15
Without sounding too geeky, having spent 3 days on old HMS Active years and years ago and i thought that was cramped whats the Type 42's like to live on?
 
#17
That's cause they had the kit of a type 82 but half the hull size to fit it in after we lost cvf and got through deck cruisers as we couldn't afford carriers, or AWW cruisers.


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All the kit of a type 82 except the Ikara, limbo, less than half the range and a radar system that first went to sea in 1956. true they did have a hanger and lynx and yes they did smell of poo.
Batch 1&2 were stunted to get more hulls past the quisling Dennis Healey and suffered accordingly. Batch 3 were the real article but still had naff radar.
Best thing about them was the crews.
 
#18
Google navy bittersweet symphony shows a guy walking down 2 deck from A to R sections and the qd


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#19
Good vid. Being a bit of a powerboat op, the ship seemed to be moving at a fast rate at the end!
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
#20

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