Last of "The Few"

A Battle of Britain veteran has died hours after celebrating his 100th birthday, taking the number of surviving members of "The Few" to five, his biographer said.

Archie McInnes, who retired to Cambridge, flew Hurricanes during the battle in the skies over southern England.
He completed his pilot training aged 21 and was commissioned the next day.

He celebrated his 100th birthday on Wednesday. He then died that night.
His biographer and friend, Jonny Cracknell, wrote of his sadness of the "hero" passing:

1564759568782.png


A true hero sadly passing away.
 
As the picture suggests, he visited RAF Coningsby and, aside from flying a Typhoon sim, got to sit in one of the BBMF Hurricanes!

So I hope that his final day was thoroughly enjoyable.

RIP and thank you Sir.

Regards,
MM
 
It makes me quite melancholy to think that the last of this truly remarkable generation will soon be gone. I grew up regaled on stories and anecdotes from the world war era. Nearly all of those characters are now passed.
RIP sir.
 
I don't know about melancholy, he lived a good life, made a ton and helped make his country a better place.
And it looks like he had a fine last day.
Damn good on him.
 
I can just imagine him laughing whilst playing his harp on a fluffy cloud as Labour misread the epitaph "The last of the Few".

Well done Sir!
 

ericferret

War Hero
There were only 21 years between WW1 and WW2. It only seems like yesterday that we were seeing the last survivors of WW 1 passing on. Very soon it will be the same for WW2.
Then we have a gap of almost 80 years since a major war.
We hear about the thankful villages in respect of WW 1, I conclude that we are the thankful generations. Long obituary lists in the papers and large additions to the war memorials have passed us by.

Men such as Archie McInnes are to be thanked for their contribution to our peace.
 
A Battle of Britain veteran has died hours after celebrating his 100th birthday, taking the number of surviving members of "The Few" to five, his biographer said.

Archie McInnes, who retired to Cambridge, flew Hurricanes during the battle in the skies over southern England.
He completed his pilot training aged 21 and was commissioned the next day.

He celebrated his 100th birthday on Wednesday. He then died that night.
His biographer and friend, Jonny Cracknell, wrote of his sadness of the "hero" passing:

View attachment 408277

A true hero sadly passing away.
I remember back in 2001 or so that members of 208 Sqn, RAF, came over to Canada to honour Henry Botterill, the last flyer for No. 8 RNAS Squadron, and to give him a painting of him in he SE5a. Frig, time flies.
 
He had a good innings. Rest in Peace Sir. I hope his Birthday was full of laughter and fun.
 
When I was a kid nearly all relatives and family friends and acquaintances who were around 60 at the time had taken part in the war in various theatres and roles, and there was always that long running joke from parents "oh here he goes with his war stories again" as if it was something boring. Now I cling to every word from these remaining chaps when describing their experiences. I was lucky enough to spend armed forces day with the last remaining D.Day veterans in York this year, and it is sad that soon them and their first hand accounts will be lost to time.

RIP to this chap, sounds like he lived a full life.
 
We were very lucky this weekend to have a 95 year old chap from our antecedent regiment come and spend two days with us (he is one of two left), it was a working weekend but once our training side was done we sat in the bar as he told his story from start to finish. You could have heard a pin drop as the whole squadron listened intently, from his landing on Juno on D.Day, fighting through the bocage, Operation Charnwood, Market Garden, being pulled away to the Ardennes during the battle of the bulge and finally ending up guarding a concentration camp in the immediate aftermath of the war, including some pretty naughty things that he said are still classified for another 25 years. It was a great experience to spend the time with him and he seemed really chuffed that his old regiment were so interested in having him there. He said to me that he hoped he hadn't bored us all to sleep with his story, and it really couldn't be further from the truth, what a legend!
 

PFGEN

GCM
The few became a little fewer on Saturday the 6th when Flight Lieutenant Maurice Mounsdon passed away at the grand age of 101.

Maurice Mounsdon: Battle Of Britain Hero Dies Aged 101

Already mentioned in the dead pool but this seemed more appropriate. Only three left now.

RIP. A good innings sir, we'll keep the memories alive, you go and enjoy the cold one waiting for you with the rest of the lads. Piano burning begins at 20.00 hrs.
 
BBC forgetting that Bomber Command were also part of Churchill's Few.

In the earler part of the war their loss rate was pretty awful, but taking the fight to the enemy was every bit as important as defending the old Sceptred Isle
 
BBC forgetting that Bomber Command were also part of Churchill's Few.

In the earler part of the war their loss rate was pretty awful, but taking the fight to the enemy was every bit as important as defending the old Sceptred Isle
Ditto Coastal Command and the Fleet Air Arm.

RIP Sir.

Regards,
MM
 
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Yokel

LE
RIP Sir.

Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few...

Churchill, to the House of Commons, 20 August 1940.
 

Ravima

Crow
This man fought that we might be free. We must never forget that. Had his generation lost the war, would we even exist?? Brave man, true hero, RIP
 

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