Last item of World War Two equipment in service with British Forces

#82
The Russkis still have a WW1 ship in commission!
Ok, it'd be a bit Trigger's Broom, but...

Russian salvage ship Kommuna - Wikipedia
Fascinating story - I had no idea anyone was building big catamarans pre-WW1. Also: The ship was laid down on 12 November 1912 under the supervision of naval architect N.V. Lesnikova - is this a typo? I can't imagine there were many women naval architects in pre-revolutionary Russia...
 
#83
Lancaster Castle is pure tourist attraction now, courts and prison have gone. Carlisle Castle may still have a military function is it still has a Reserve barracks within it.
Still worth a visit though. The prison part is still there as it is used as a prison film set. I was lucky and had the tour when the court was still in operation (but was closed for the holidays). Its all very facinating.
I wasn't aware until the tour that the vast majority of the 'castle' is quite modern being built in the 1700's to imitate a 'traditional' castle with only the Norman keep being one of the original parts.
You actually access the keep on the tour through a hole which had been quarried through the wall. I'd say cut, but it was a very, very thick wall.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#84
Over 100 people were killed in Dido Building at HMS VERNON in Portsmouth when it was demolished by a German bomb in March 1941. The establishment was hit several more times during the Second World War.

From 'The Torpedomen - HMS Vernon's Story 1872-1986' by Rear Admiral Nicho Poland CB CBE:


Getting back on track, the British Mk 8 torpedo entered service with the Royal Navy in 1927 and was used to sink the cruiser, ARA BELGRANO, in 1982. It remained in service until 1991.
Edited by my Late FiL the no longer dodging the coffin, coffin dodger! I liked him just because the wife hated her stepdad!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#85
not been in service for a while (and was converted to 7.62 so not a true bren anyway)
Striking through the Bren stamping on my 1943 L4 with two lines doesn't stop it having been built as a Bren any more than putting all that stuff on a cent hull and calling it a barv stops it being a cent!
 
#86
Her Majesty. Her role in WW2 isn't her role now, but she still in use
Try stating that you are 'still using a Queen' and see where it gets you.
 
#87
Striking through the Bren stamping on my 1943 L4 with two lines doesn't stop it having been built as a Bren any more than putting all that stuff on a cent hull and calling it a barv stops it being a cent!
IIRC they were taken out of service in '92
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#89
In June 1940, the first attempt to render safe a ground mine by divers was made in Poole Harbour, Dorset. A diving unit from HMS Excellent, supported by divers trained in Rendering Mines Safe (RMS) techniques from HMS Vernon, successfully removed the fuze from a Type GC mine underwater although the mine exploded as it was towed inshore. For his central role in this task, Able Seaman Diver R G Tawn was subsequently awarded the DSM.

On discovering the skill of HMS Vernon’s mine technicians, the Germans placed booby traps in some mines. One was fitted with a small explosive charge that detonated when the mine was stripped in the mining shed at HMS Vernon on 6 August 1940 causing the deaths of Commissioned Gunner (T) Reginald A. Cook, PO Cecil H. Fletcher, AB William B. Croake, AB William J. Stearns and AB Alfred E. Stevens and serious injuries to other personnel. Following this incident, mines were stripped and examined at a disused limestone quarry at nearby Buriton which was nick-named HMS Mirtle (short for Mine Investigation Range).

Newer techniques, including the use of ROVs, are used to deal with underwater ordnance today.
The Germans used a photo electric cell to booby trap some devices. It was only discovered because the crew attempting to disarm it in south wales during a thunderstorm noticed the cell in the light of the lightening. They managed to cover it and remove by feel and found that the cell was partially exposed by the lightening but not enough to cause it to generate the current to fire the trap. Lucky barstewards or what!
 
#93
I'm sure my LMG in the late 80's had 1944 crossed out on the side. Horrible big thing, had to lug it around on exercise, but never ever got a chance to fire it.
 
#94
Match Fuzee

Bangalore Torpedo.
The Exploder Dynamo Condenser (EDC) was still in use up until the mid 80s as was PE 808 until '83. On one occasion I was issued with PE 852 that had shrunk to the point where I thought half had been stolen but it was in fact all there. I cannot remember the exact date on the 4" paper inside the boxes but it was war stock dated no later than 1945.
(Belize - 1980 - Blowing HLS's)
 
#95
Millbank water filter bag. Made from 1945 to 1989 (per IWM, which has no image available.) Issued for filtering sediment and particulates from ground water or local streams, to be used in conjunction with sterilizer tabs. Looked something like this, which was issued to an Australian Vietnam veteran:



As issued to
Private R J Barry, 6 Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment

The bag was to be soaked in the water intended for filtration, filled, then hung up somewhere, somehow. When the water level had got past the black line it was considered safe to fill the canteen and once sterilizer tablets had been added, the water was considered safe to drink.
 
Last edited:
#96
Ammo boots.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
#97
The Sam Browne Belt!
I didn't like the newly issued ones, so I rang our museum where I knew they held quite a few old ones. I asked a member of the Regt to collect the one that I had arranged with the curator. He came back with a 'pigskin' version which developed a lovely finish when 'bulled. As he handed it to me he said " This is pigskin, don't take it too personally Sir! I later looked up the name written inside the belt, it had once belonged to one of our 'Boar War' time officers.
 
#98
Millbank water filter bag. Made from 1945 to 1989 (per IWM, which has no image available.) Issued for filtering sediment and particulates from ground water or local streams, to be used in conjunction with sterilizer tabs. Looked something like this, which was issued to an Australian Vietnam veteran:



As issued to
Private R J Barry, 6 Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment

The bag was to be soaked in the water intended for filtration, filled, then hung up somewhere, somehow. When the water level had got past the black line it was considered safe to fill the canteen and once sterilizer tablets had been added, the water was considered safe to drink.
ISTR -Fill to black line, string up, filtered water runs through the material and off the lower tip into water bottle where you add your Puritabs etc.
 
#99
ISTR -Fill to black line, string up, filtered water runs through the material and off the lower tip into water bottle where you add your Puritabs etc.
No, fill entire bag, hang it up, then let water seep through until its level is below the black line. Supposedly that gets the worst of the muck out.
 
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