Last item of World War Two equipment in service with British Forces

#63
Over 100 people were killed in Dido Building at HMS VERNON in Portsmouth when it was demolished by a German bomb in March 1941. The establishment was hit several more times during the Second World War.

From 'The Torpedomen - HMS Vernon's Story 1872-1986' by Rear Admiral Nicho Poland CB CBE:


Getting back on track, the British Mk 8 torpedo entered service with the Royal Navy in 1927 and was used to sink the cruiser, ARA BELGRANO, in 1982.
I recall reading a book called Design To Kill by a former Royal Engineers Major (and EOD expert) who recalled a wartime incident at Vernon when a number of men were killed by the anti handling charge in a recovered mine.

On the subject of mines, am I right in thinking the wartime system of dealing with limpet mines continued in use, and still might be in use now?
 
#66
Surely the oldest thing still in continuous service has to be the Tower of London?

Still a military fortress and holding place for the Crown Jewels.

Any older buildings still used for the same purpose?

Lancaster Castle maybe? Edinburgh?
Lancaster Castle is pure tourist attraction now, courts and prison have gone. Carlisle Castle may still have a military function is it still has a Reserve barracks within it.
 
#68
When did the old style DR Boots get phased out? Or are they still issued?
 
#69
I recall reading a book called Design To Kill by a former Royal Engineers Major (and EOD expert) who recalled a wartime incident at Vernon when a number of men were killed by the anti handling charge in a recovered mine.

On the subject of mines, am I right in thinking the wartime system of dealing with limpet mines continued in use, and still might be in use now?
In June 1940, the first attempt to render safe a ground mine by divers was made in Poole Harbour, Dorset. A diving unit from HMS Excellent, supported by divers trained in Rendering Mines Safe (RMS) techniques from HMS Vernon, successfully removed the fuze from a Type GC mine underwater although the mine exploded as it was towed inshore. For his central role in this task, Able Seaman Diver R G Tawn was subsequently awarded the DSM.

On discovering the skill of HMS Vernon’s mine technicians, the Germans placed booby traps in some mines. One was fitted with a small explosive charge that detonated when the mine was stripped in the mining shed at HMS Vernon on 6 August 1940 causing the deaths of Commissioned Gunner (T) Reginald A. Cook, PO Cecil H. Fletcher, AB William B. Croake, AB William J. Stearns and AB Alfred E. Stevens and serious injuries to other personnel. Following this incident, mines were stripped and examined at a disused limestone quarry at nearby Buriton which was nick-named HMS Mirtle (short for Mine Investigation Range).

Newer techniques, including the use of ROVs, are used to deal with underwater ordnance today.
 
#78
If it was 'offshore' why would that have mattered?
It matters because the way to dispose of surplus or unsafe ammunition is not to turn it into a visible and dangerous UXO pollutant when the tide goes out. At SHB this can be 12 km at the top of the Range Area. In addition disposal by firing is expensive in terms of manpower, materiel, weaponry and noise complaints.
 

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#79
Lancaster Castle is pure tourist attraction now, courts and prison have gone. Carlisle Castle may still have a military function is it still has a Reserve barracks within it.
The courts at Lancaster are still in use.
 
#80
Handle, Mattock & Pick, guarding, tank-park for the use of.
Broom, Bass. Head.
And Broom, Bass, Handle.
Gosh, this is as much fun as it was the last time we went around this particular, Buoy, Bobbing Up and Down, navigation.
 
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