Last German survivor of WWI passes away unnoticed

#2
Well, they did lose.
 
#3
Rest In Peace old soldier.

It doesn't really need saying that WWI wasn't WWII, and Imperial Germany a world away from Nazi Germany with its distinction of an overlay of 'national evil'. Lions were led by donkeys on each side and across the world a generation of lives were lost.
 
#4
It was on teletext the other day that he was the second last and there was, obviously, one more survivor.

Jockster
 

oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
#6
I see his wife only died in 2003 aged 102, they were married for 75 years.
Another remakable achievement.

It may have been unrecorded in Germany but all the UK papers are covering it!
 
#8
Be they German soldiers of the first or second war, they were soldiers for their country. They deserve that respect.
RIP.
 
#9
it has been in the papers here - but only mentioned briefly

it's still difficult in this country to deal with the past
and i guess that's why paying the respect those men deserve
will never take place - as it does in other countries eg

ruhe in frieden
 
#10
Though Merkel couldn't bother her French kissing arse to pay some respect, there is quite a mention of it in the more prominent forms of the German Press. Saying that he still deserves more acknowledgement from his country.

Rest in Peace
 
#11
one of my grandfathers fought at the Somme ... but Dr. Erich Kästner still deserves respect.
RIP
 
#12
.338lapua_magnum said:
Be they German soldiers of the first or second war, they were soldiers for their country. They deserve that respect.
RIP.
I'm sure the vets of the Waffen SS will take great comfort from your 'respect' for what they did for Das Reich.
 
#13
rabid_hamster said:
one of my grandfathers fought at the Somme ... but Dr. Erich Kästner still deserves respect.
RIP
Both my Granddads served their country, on BOTH sides. You are right, Dr Kastner does deserve respect.
 
#14
Airfix said:
I'm sure the vets of the Waffen SS will take great comfort from your 'respect' for what they did for Das Reich.
I think it's perfectly possible to respect a man for fighting for his country, politics or religious beliefs without having the slightest respect for any of those. Germans make good soldiers and in the First lot fought a mostly 'decent' war. I know my Uncle, who fought at the tail end of the First War, told of how it wasn't unusual for German PoWs in 1918 to get genuine respect and even affection from the troops who'd just captured them.

My gran told me a second hand tale of his about how a badly-battered Bn of his Brigade were sitting by the road when the captured remains of the German rearguard who'd just cut them up limped by. The response was to give them a round of applause!
 
#15
.338lapua_magnum said:
Be they German soldiers of the first or second war, they were soldiers for their country. They deserve that respect.
RIP.
Hear, hear - whether they were friend or foe they were the tool of the government of their day, they didn't choose to sit in a filthy, water logged trench infested with rats being gassed, bombarded and machine gunned day and night.


I hope he is welcomed into the halls of Valhalla by all those who went before. RIP Herr Doktor.
 
#16
Billwhyman said:
rabid_hamster said:
one of my grandfathers fought at the Somme ... but Dr. Erich Kästner still deserves respect.
RIP
Both my Granddads served their country, on BOTH sides. You are right, Dr Kastner does deserve respect.
There's probably not a family in those countries involved in The Great War who don't have a family member who fought. A great great uncle of mine died on the Western Front and I can only imagine the terrible loss felt by communities across the countries as they lost their menfolk en masse.


Move him into the sun -
Gently its touch awoke him once,
At home, whispering of fields unsown.
Always it woke him, even in France,
Until this morning and this snow.
If anything might rouse him now
The kind old sun will know.

Think how it wakes the seeds -
Woke, once, the clays of a cold star.
Are limbs so dear-achieved, are sides
Full-nerved, - still warm, - too hard to stir?
Was it for this the clay grew tall?
- O what made fatuous sunbeams toil
To break earth's sleep at all?


~ Futility - Wilfred Owen
 
#17
smartascarrots said:
Airfix said:
I'm sure the vets of the Waffen SS will take great comfort from your 'respect' for what they did for Das Reich.
I think it's perfectly possible to respect a man for fighting for his country, politics or religious beliefs without having the slightest respect for any of those. Germans make good soldiers and in the First lot fought a mostly 'decent' war. I know my Uncle, who fought at the tail end of the First War, told of how it wasn't unusual for German PoWs in 1918 to get genuine respect and even affection from the troops who'd just captured them.

My gran told me a second hand tale of his about how a badly-battered Bn of his Brigade were sitting by the road when the captured remains of the German rearguard who'd just cut them up limped by. The response was to give them a round of applause!
Fair point, well put. I greatly dislike all encompassing sentimental 'respect' statements just because someone's 'served'.

I'm sure when our minds are free from 'sentimentality' we can all think of elements of both foe and friend alike that deserve no respect for their demise.
 
#19
Airfix said:
.338lapua_magnum said:
Be they German soldiers of the first or second war, they were soldiers for their country. They deserve that respect.
RIP.
I'm sure the vets of the Waffen SS will take great comfort from your 'respect' for what they did for Das Reich.
Are you confusing the Waffen (the fighting ) SS with those that were used to guard the camps? Do not confuse the likes of Bernhard Krause, Max Hansen and Jochen Peiper with those that guarded the camps. These men fought hard, expected no quarter and gave none.
 

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