Laser Treatment

Discussion in 'Gunners' started by SmithsRail, Jul 29, 2007.

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  1. is there any chance of you get away with having laser treatment before you join the army then keep schtum about it? or is it likely to come out when you have your medical? as in one of those things that looks in to your eyes? or do they not have them? cheers in advance! :)
  2. I'm going back to the late eighties/early nineties here, but I'm pretty sure that if you could read the bottom line of the eye chart from a distance, then you were in.

    When I joined, I suffered terribly with Asthma when I was a kid but 'grew out of it' when I was 17-18.

    I never told them a thing, passed all the medicals and the physical day at Sutton Coldfield and that was that.

    I'm sure things will have advanced somewhat, but given that you're allowed spectacles to correct your vision anyway, I can't see that having had Lazer Eye Surgery would be a problem.

    Especially as they're giving out free tit-jobs to unhappy split-arrses, these days.


    I had a load of Lazer treatment done by the Army when I was in, all paid for by them, but I must confess mine was to have a cluster of warts removed from my bell-end, after I'd roared up some old ripper in Amesbury during the 'Friday Night in The Kings Arms' glory years.

    I was down the GU clinic in Tidworth so often, that they used to send me a Christmas card.

    Hope that helps.....
  3. GunnersQuadrant

    GunnersQuadrant LE Moderator


    There are a fair amount of soldiers who have had laser eye surgery whilst they are serving and have sworn by the change to their lives. Personally i would be honest about it just in case something needs to be done medically later on during your career. I cannot see it being an obstacle to you joining up, in fact it may improve your chances. Good luck.
  4. sorry if i'm hijacking the thread here, but i also have a question about laser eye surgery.

    would it stop my from a career in the police?

    sorry once again

  5. I soldiered for years in all theatres with c lens: I managed, but it was unpleasant/inconvenient at times, and meant evolving some strategies - such as sleeping sitting up, so the lens didn't dry out.

    The problem I had in those years was that eye surgery was about the same as buying a PC: every year the price halved and the performance improved - with the obvious fact that you can buy a new PC every year, but you only get one shot with your eyes!

    Later in my career, whilst serving with a unit that had required a fairly rigourous selection to get into, I decided that Lasik was sufficiently established to be worth taking the plunge. Had both eyes done, and achieved near 20/20. Actually, I'd have been happy with an 80% correction of my short sight. Yes, it transformed my life in all sorts of ways.

    Shortly after I had my eyes "done", I had a pulheems. My unit required top condition, but no-one had even noticed my short sight in the past, and they certainly didn't detect the remarkable improvement in my eye grading!

    I'm not sure that either the police or the army would particularly care these days if you'd had your eyes done. They probably had the ban for historical reasons, because of the uncertainty over the long-term effects and the possibility they'd have to fork out expensive medical treatment for someone with bad eye deterioration. These days, Lasik and the other treatments seem to have achieved a very high success rate, and are increasingly recommended by the medical world.
  6. Ref the Police (and the Army) I think the policy is that LASEK is OK as the mechanical strength of your eye is unaffected after the membrane heals again (about a week) but LASIK affects your eye as the cornea itself is slided into, thus your eye is not as physically strong for a couple of years.

    I might be wrong, but there should be a policy posted somewhere on it.
  7. A long time ago, I was told that as there is a risk that it could go wrong (as with any surgical procedure), there was no guarantee that I would be accepted following laser surgery.

    I think they meant if it went wrong I wouldn't be accepted, rather than not being accepted BECAUSE I'd had surgery.

    Best bet is to ask - you're considering laser surgery, will it stop you joining. If you are happy with the surgical risk then go for it (as long as they say yes of course).

    As with any non-disclosure, they could hammer down the line for not telling the truth on your application.
  8. I spoke with a recruiter at the Glasgow ACIO in June concerning this (I had surgery January this year) and he pulled out a file (that I read myself) stating that rules for laser eye surgery had been "relaxed" / changed somewhat since April and that basically they go by a case by case basis. You won't be automatically disqualified from applying, though you will need to meet certain criteria pre and post-surgery, and you will need to wait 12 months from date of surgery before they get the ball rolling on your application (well, that was the case for me anyway - "come back and see us in January son and we'll get your application started then. Get yourself fit in the meantime!")

    While LASIK is no longer an automatic bar to entry and is suitable (going by what I read anyway), LASEK is preferred for the armed forces and those leading an active lifestyle.

    I suggest you take the honest route. While there is a chance the MO will deem you medically unfit post-surgery, and there may be scope for appeal, if you're caught lying they will bin you - even mid-training -for lack of integrity.

    Pop into your local ACIO and they'll (hopefully) confirm what I've said anyway.
  9. Another thing to think about, is what you would want to do when you eventually leave. I work as a train driver now and cannot have laser or actually any eye surgery!