Larkspur A41 manpack Radio and Soviet Airborne P-254 manpack radio

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
Zero beat.

That is all.
 
Long time ago... I used to test & repair some of these memories, sighs Anyway:-

A40 - yeuch!
A41/42 ( differing freq ranges ), were man packs with solid non -recharge bty packs, supplying various voltages. They used small glass valves internally. You had to make sure they were well bedded into their sockets, with no bent pins!
A13 as I recall was a sort of manpack hybrid, as you could switch to PHASE modn for use in the jungle??
A43 ground to air etc. Really sh1t to repair - I remember all the little cans & special repair case?
B45/B47 - a step up veh mounted, again different freq ranges
C11/ C11 SSB - pain to work on. C13 the same.
C42/ C45 ok to work on as long, as you kept your fingers from the wrong place. I ended up with a few pinhole burns over time!
There was another monster, can't recall the nomenclature, might have been C150. Everyone tried to quickly slope shoulders when one of those turned up!

Then Clansman turned up, - pile of ****
 

Actingunpaid

War Hero
Control Signaller course. Chief Instructor was 15/19H and he knew I was a Rebro driver. Come the HF/rebroadcast exercise, he very kindly sent me and my Rover crew to Bulbarrow Hill, just north of Bovvy, while other crews drove all over southern and central England, leaving at sparrow fart.

Chatted all day with Bovvy, but heard nothing from all the outstations I was meant to be rebroadcasting. At the wash up, the instructors out in the field agreed that nobody else had a grip on Larkspur HF skywave and rebroadcasting.

Phew. Dodged a smoking gun there.
We set up on a village green in the sticks and managed to contact Ripon and Tidworth at first attempt so went to the pub.
 

Actingunpaid

War Hero
Long time ago... I used to test & repair some of these memories, sighs Anyway:-

A40 - yeuch!
A41/42 ( differing freq ranges ), were man packs with solid non -recharge bty packs, supplying various voltages. They used small glass valves internally. You had to make sure they were well bedded into their sockets, with no bent pins!
A13 as I recall was a sort of manpack hybrid, as you could switch to PHASE modn for use in the jungle??
A43 ground to air etc. Really sh1t to repair - I remember all the little cans & special repair case?
B45/B47 - a step up veh mounted, again different freq ranges
C11/ C11 SSB - pain to work on. C13 the same.
C42/ C45 ok to work on as long, as you kept your fingers from the wrong place. I ended up with a few pinhole burns over time!
There was another monster, can't recall the nomenclature, might have been C150. Everyone tried to quickly slope shoulders when one of those turned up!

Then Clansman turned up, - pile of ****
Yet the Racal stuff I used issued in another country was excellent kit.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
'kin bleeps and wannabe bleeps. What's wrong with shouting?
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
We set up on a village green in the sticks and managed to contact Ripon and Tidworth at first attempt so went to the pub.
Reminded of an evening in Paderborn. 13/18H (with whom it turned out 20 years later we'd amalgamate) were in Saffron Walden or somewhere, and HMS Arrow, with whom we were twinned, was in Hong Kong. "Wouldn't it be good to talk to 13/18H and The Arrer?" said a grownup.

So we set up dipoles on the football pitch, plugged into one of the Command Saracens.

Well that's a night I'll never get back. Not as if they even let me anywhere near the kit.
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
Soviet Combat Net Radio for the Ground Forces was pretty much 100% VHF at the tactical level - say 30-50 MHz and, up until the late 80s at least, overwhelmingly analogue FM. VDV would need that in order to operate and coordinate with Ground Forces after insertion.

Don't know this particular piece of kit, but dependent on its role, that would determine the freq range - if JTAC, then air frequencies in the higher VHF/low UHF, if rear link, then HF (3-30MHz), either Morse or SSB voice.
 
You take that back or I'll have you hoofed from this site for eternity, even if I have to use the last of my blackmail snaps involving the admins, a bucket of frogs and a bath full of Swarfega.

Shan’t.
 
I am writing 10k word scenario to compliment a forthcoming Cold-War-turned-hot, war game.
I am hoping to pick a few brains on technical details of the two radios for the story.
I know how many will recall, with little fondness, carrying the A41 and not being able at times to reach another callsign even when they were in sight. However, if anyone can remember the formula required to find the correct length of D10 telephone cable for an antennae to send a Morse message via skywave transmission I would be obliged. I have it in my head that it was the radio frequency divided by 234(???) and add 8 feet??

As to the Soviet P-245 manpack set, I would appreciate its frequency range and the radio's range with whatever length of long and short whip it employed as they are not given to publishing technical detail like that on the web.

Thank you.
Search complicated by Sig (as in Sauer not Signal) P245

You could do worse than try these guys. Russian ussr military soviet old vacuum tube portable transistor radios

We have the resources to create a radio museum, and we also advise
film studios on a military topic to create the right scenes
using radio technology. We complete private collections.

We International Collectors Can Make Radiomuseum and Consult
movie producers. Make private collections.



Igor, Sergey Gridchin
st. February 220
Pyatigorsk, Russia
8-8793-383285
+ 7-918-7543204
ua6hgy@mail.ru

Igor Bobel
1440 Ocean Parkway 6E.
Brooklyn, NY 11230
USA
(917) 755-1108.
rigonda22@yahoo.com

 
Here is an interesting find. A PDF book (in Russian) about the training of a russian radio specialist. P245 is not listed. However you may find it very informative if you manage to download a copy. You may need to register with the site first.

Title: Training of a radio communication specialist. Special, technical and tactical-special training
Author: Tyutvin N.V. (ed.)
Pages: 546
Format: PDF
Size: 11.3 Mb
Quality: Normal
Language: Russian
Year of publication: 2007


The textbook gives tactical and technical characteristics of small and medium-sized radio stations power, and also considered the methods of conducting classes on special, technical and tactical-special training. The textbook is intended for sergeants of the signal troops of the RF Armed Forces.
The textbook was developed taking into account the requirements of the instructions, orders and directives of the Minister of Defense of the Russian Federation, the Chief of Communications of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.

Подготовка специалиста радиосвязи. Специальная, техническая и тактико-специальная подготовка
 
Long time ago... I used to test & repair some of these memories, sighs Anyway:-

A40 - yeuch!
A41/42 ( differing freq ranges ), were man packs with solid non -recharge bty packs, supplying various voltages. They used small glass valves internally. You had to make sure they were well bedded into their sockets, with no bent pins!
A13 as I recall was a sort of manpack hybrid, as you could switch to PHASE modn for use in the jungle??
A43 ground to air etc. Really sh1t to repair - I remember all the little cans & special repair case?
B45/B47 - a step up veh mounted, again different freq ranges
C11/ C11 SSB - pain to work on. C13 the same.
C42/ C45 ok to work on as long, as you kept your fingers from the wrong place. I ended up with a few pinhole burns over time!
There was another monster, can't recall the nomenclature, might have been C150. Everyone tried to quickly slope shoulders when one of those turned up!

Then Clansman turned up, - pile of ****

There was another monster, can't recall the nomenclature, might have been C150. Everyone tried to quickly slope shoulders when one of those turned up!


C50? Used in the BRUIN system. Are we allowed to talk about that yet? All very hush hush in the 70's.
All that cipher stuff came to us at 20 Field Electronic workshop in Minden in 70's. Damn, I hear helicopters overhead now. :salut: :party:
 
Search complicated by Sig (as in Sauer not Signal) P245

You could do worse than try these guys. Russian ussr military soviet old vacuum tube portable transistor radios

We have the resources to create a radio museum, and we also advise

film studios on a military topic to create the right scenes

using radio technology. We complete private collections.

We International Collectors Can Make Radiomuseum and Consult

movie producers. Make private collections.


Igor, Sergey Gridchin
st. February 220
Pyatigorsk, Russia
8-8793-383285
+ 7-918-7543204
ua6hgy@mail.ru

Igor Bobel
1440 Ocean Parkway 6E.
Brooklyn, NY 11230
USA
(917) 755-1108.
rigonda22@yahoo.com

Many thanks , I have whizzed off an email
 
So we are looking for (in English) R245

Р-245
  1. Р-245 – автомобильная КВ радиовещательная станция “Буря”. Размещается на 7 автомобилях ЗиЛ-157
  2. Р-245М – автомобильная КВ радиовещательная станция “Буря-М”
Translation:

R-245

  1. R-245 is an automobile HF radio broadcasting station "Burya". Fits 7 ZIL-157 vehicles
  2. R-245M - automobile HF radio broadcasting station "Burya-M"
Burya is Russian for Storm, also the name of a cruise missile.

Серия Р-2хх | Военная радиосвязь

Nothing for the 245 in this long list. First section is portable and wearable radios.
Радиостанции: Военные радиостанции

Lets look at a Zil-157 radio truck

1622127499116.png


Looking at more modern kit:

Aqueduct system P168 from year 2000 - current.

The equipment of the complex allows communication in the VHF range at distances of up to 30 km in motion and up to 70 km in the parking lot in the HF band - at distances up to 350 km [1] .

In addition to operating in analog mode, the Aqueduct complex allows digital data exchange at rates of 100, 200, 1200 bit / s in the HF band and 1.2-16 kbit / s in the VHF band [1] .


Russian wikipedia page

The manufacturers page Семейство радиостанций Р-168Е - АО «Концерн «Созвездие» Pressing the English option drops out of that page, so just use the original Russian and google translate browser plug in.

Translation:

PRODUCT CATALOG

Family of radio stations R-168E​

PURPOSE :
HF - VHF radio equipment of the R-168E "Aqueduct" complex is designed to provide stable anti-jamming and reconnaissance radio communications in difficult operating conditions in all subunits and units from a soldier to a division commander in the frequency range from 1.5 to 108 MHz.
Modes of work:
  • Simplex, dual frequency simplex and duplex modes of operation
  • Software tuning of the operating frequency
  • Adaptive automated communication
  • Technical masking of speech and digital information
  • Scanning Reception at Preset Frequencies (up to 64)
  • Selective and circular communication
  • Manual and automatic data entry
  • Retransmission of information
  • Collaboration with an old fleet of radio stations
Features of the complex
  • Economical reception for portable and wearable radios to save energy consumption
  • Software restructuring of the operating frequency to ensure communication under the influence of automated countermeasures of the enemy
  • High speed tuning of the operating frequency of VHF and HF radio equipment according to a given algorithm in the entire operating range
  • Adaptive, automated addressable communications for robust performance in interference environments. The radio stations automatically analyze the interference situation at the frequencies allocated for operation and, if necessary, switch to frequencies with a minimum level of interference
  • Technical masking excludes unauthorized wiretapping of communications over the radio channel
  • Ease of operation is ensured by the possibility of automated selection and input of frequency keys and other radio data into the radio.
  • The functional-modular principle of building radio equipment allows in the field workshops to carry out repairs by replacing modules
Modernization of radio stations "Aqueduct"

Portable radio stations R-168E VHF range

Portable radio station R-168-1KE KV-band

Portable and portable radio sets R-168E VHF range

Portable and portable radio sets R-168E of the microwave range

Portable radio stations R-168E of the VHF range

Portable radio station R-168-5KNE HF-band

Portable radio stations R-168E of the HF band

Repeater R-168-0.5U (R) E

Device for technical masking of voice messages "R-168MA (5) E"

Transportable device for technical masking of speech information R-168 MVE

Marker transmitter R-168MP

Search receiver R-168PP

1622125231191.png

1622125871736.png
1622125904458.png
 
That Zil is intriguing as it is carrying some antennas for interesting propagation. Lets find out.

I found a match to that exact photo, with the following explanation (after translation):

Radio technical means of communication and control​

Numerous types of military radio stations, radar posts, headquarters controls, radio direction finders and even tropospheric (space) communication systems were located in KUNG or K-66 vans, which were based on the ZIL-157 chassis of the second and third generations with shielded electrical equipment.

1622128537425.png

R-140 "Strip" radio station in the back of K-66U1D on the ZIL-157KEG chassis in the Hungarian army

Смотреть авто зил 157

In other words, not the exact radio we were looking for but interesting nonetheless and possibly a useful resource for the Zil-157

This picture, from Yandex Zen, shows a satellite link operated from a Zil-157. It is not clear what the tower is supporting but given long range is covered by satellite, it may be localised VHF. Note the simple but effective parabolic reflectors, probably made from pressed square sections of steel. I wonder where BSB got their Squarial idea from?

1622129561321.png
 
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