Larkspur A41 manpack Radio and Soviet Airborne P-254 manpack radio

I am writing 10k word scenario to compliment a forthcoming Cold-War-turned-hot, war game.
I am hoping to pick a few brains on technical details of the two radios for the story.
I know how many will recall, with little fondness, carrying the A41 and not being able at times to reach another callsign even when they were in sight. However, if anyone can remember the formula required to find the correct length of D10 telephone cable for an antennae to send a Morse message via skywave transmission I would be obliged. I have it in my head that it was the radio frequency divided by 234(???) and add 8 feet??

As to the Soviet P-245 manpack set, I would appreciate its frequency range and the radio's range with whatever length of long and short whip it employed as they are not given to publishing technical detail like that on the web.

Thank you.
 
It is 234/F. F for frequency in Mcs) Mega cycles. The plus 8 ft might be just enough for you to miss the skip distance hence you cannot communicate with someone in Line of sight.
 
The plus 8 ft might be just enough for you to miss the skip distance hence you cannot communicate with someone in Line of sight.
So the transmission is not going to be picked up by local transistor radios, TVs, and the like?
 
A41 and skywave in the same paragraph? I wasn't aware that the A41 could do that. A13 perhaps.

Never had a problem with A41 comms but it did require that the operators at both ends knew how to calibrate.

I was a fan of the Murphy carrier. Much more comfortable than the Clansman abortion.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Although I never used A41 and skywave, I used the former in NI (once, patrolling the border) and The Plain on a foot patrol (punishment for my driver causing us to spend two days thumb up bum, mind in neutral while Bluebell fixed a "problem"). And when I transferred and took to running the MRG radio setup, we used skywave to connect Clansman to Div on the Log Net.

When I realised REME couldn't do these sums (which I confess to have forgotten after 36 years), I spent a stag plotting a graph of frequency against dipole length and fablonned it to the radio vehicle wall where the coax went through the window.

This plus permanent night stags ensured I didn't get awoken ever again by REME who couldn't do sums. Or transcribe codes onto boards.
 
A41 and skywave in the same paragraph? I wasn't aware that the A41 could do that. A13 perhaps.

Never had a problem with A41 comms but it did require that the operators at both ends knew how to calibrate.

I was a fan of the Murphy carrier. Much more comfortable than the Clansman abortion.
You may indeed be correct!!
The A13 was a radio (with thick glass re-chargeable batteries and a hand generator?) I trained on during my regimental signallers course back in 1975 when we had to learn Morse. I only recall using it once more which was in The Gambia, where skywave was used.
The fog of time and all that.
Many thanks!
 
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Helm

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John GGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG
You take that back or I'll have you hoofed from this site for eternity, even if I have to use the last of my blackmail snaps involving the admins, a bucket of frogs and a bath full of Swarfega.
 

Actingunpaid

War Hero
Can remember having to tune the antenna on the C11 on regimental signals course. Now that was a proper bit of kit, not 2 tin cans with a bit of string.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Can remember having to tune the antenna on the C11 on regimental signals course. Now that was a proper bit of kit, not 2 tin cans with a bit of string.
Control Signaller course. Chief Instructor was 15/19H and he knew I was a Rebro driver. Come the HF/rebroadcast exercise, he very kindly sent me and my Rover crew to Bulbarrow Hill, just north of Bovvy, while other crews drove all over southern and central England, leaving at sparrow fart.

Chatted all day with Bovvy, but heard nothing from all the outstations I was meant to be rebroadcasting. At the wash up, the instructors out in the field agreed that nobody else had a grip on Larkspur HF skywave and rebroadcasting.

Phew. Dodged a smoking gun there.
 

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