Large EOD find

Not at all, just pointing out your knowledge is from the internet. Mine is having handled the actual weapons.
I know it burns you up that Bravo Bravo is Adrian Carton de Wiart compared to your service
anyone discussing ‘accuracy’ with regards a sub machine gun is talking nonsense.
its the sort of pooh you see in Gunz & Preppers, but in the real world, can’t hit the bugger by throwing it at him? Don’t bother trying to shoot at him.
Now Hush, grown ups are talking.
 

In_Twists

Clanker
I've never seen any actual evidence that STENs were unreliable, it might just be a myth based on how crudely made it was, the single feed STEN mag is a reverse engineered MP 28 mag which was carried on to the MP40, the magazines in all three are all interchangeable, did they have reliability problems ?
Ditto SMG
 
I've never seen any actual evidence that STENs were unreliable, it might just be a myth based on how crudely made it was, the single feed STEN mag is a reverse engineered MP 28 mag which was carried on to the MP40, the magazines in all three are all interchangeable, did they have reliability problems ?

Depended on how well, or badly, the magazines had been made.
QC of STEN mags was 'variable', (iirc, something like 50 sub contractors making them) but yes, even the much vaunted MP40 had exactly the same fail to feed and stoppage problems 'Do not hold ze magazine Landser! ze Gerat will not Gerat!' as the STEN.
 
Reminds me of a trip to the Isle of Wight with Mrs RHM. Bimbling along to catch the ferry at Gun Wharf in Portsmouth, to be overtaken by an RLC EOD wagon with blue lights and sirens going, steaming through the rush hour traffic and accompanied by local old Bill clearing the way ahead for them.

We caught the same ferry as them.

EOD team and cozzers were sat in the lounge of the ferry next to us, drinking tea, eating Ginsters and generally kicking back and shooting the sh*t.

Come the ferry landing at Fishbourne on the IoW, off our heroes went again, blue lights and loads of noise. like a scene from the professionals.

Well it made me chuckle, anyway.
On a very rare occasion that a bleep team was called out from Catterick we would be the same, blue lights and sirens hitting 85 on the M62.
Until you got to the uphill bit - and then everyone you had passed for the past 10 minutes overtook you.
That is of course if you made it past the A1 before the clutch went (and everyone you had passed with the blues and twos were pointing and laughing at you on the hard shoulder).


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
Not enough mention of the Owen SMG!
Came across a draw full of these in a certain ‘place’.

The curator/storeman didn’t know what they were (they were in pretty bad nick tbh) and I only knew as I share a name with them and they caught my eye in a book as a youth.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

W21A

LE
Book Reviewer
Gladio was the first thing came to my mind. You say they are too old, but presumably the stuff that was stored away in the 1960s for when "the baloon goes up" wouldn't have been the most up to date, modern equipment but rather ex-WWII stuff, expendable and untraceable? A bit like Jimmy's box of Lee Enfields stored under the bed in his spare room in Reggie Perrin.

Seems very today somehow.
 
Ditto SMG
Sterling mags were Double stack double feed with rollers for a follower, a reliable design from the start compared to double stack single feed or single stack single feed
 
anyone discussing ‘accuracy’ with regards a sub machine gun is talking nonsense.
its the sort of pooh you see in Gunz & Preppers, but in the real world, can’t hit the bugger by throwing it at him? Don’t bother trying to shoot at him.
Now Hush, grown ups are talking.
So you're actually claiming there is no accuracy standard for a SMG? then why fit sights boyo?

Walt you really need to get out of the basement and get into a uniform
 

HE117

LE
Came across a draw full of these in a certain ‘place’.

The curator/storeman didn’t know what they were (they were in pretty bad nick tbh) and I only knew as I share a name with them and they caught my eye in a book as a youth.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
There were both Owen and Austen guns in the Sandhurst collection which I fired in the 70s.. they both worked, but the Owen was better made and seemed more reliable. The vertical feeding magazine no doubt assisted in this and, apart from need an offset sight, did not seem to be a problem in use. Allegedly the Owen was better in close country as the mag did not get caught in brush etc. It was very simply and strongly made with a straightforward "plug in" barrel, which made cleaning easy.

The Austen just seemed to be a slightly better made STEN with two handles..

The thing I remember was that both were painted in camouflage colours, which seems to have been an Aus thing.. I have seen, and used Owens since then, and they have all been painted...
 

HE117

LE
Sterling mags were Double stack double feed with rollers for a follower, a reliable design from the start compared to double stack single feed or single stack single feed
True, but the sten mags were very variable in quality which didn't help. The mp40 mags had far better QC.
In days of yore when such things were permitted over here, we had a legally owned sten held by an rfd down in the gun club. It never jammed on the range. The owner explained that he'd binned half the mags he'd aquired as being unfit for purpose, and kept the better ones. If half the mags you get thrown at you are iffy, it won't help what you think about the sten. However, given a well made magazine and a reasonably made sten, you're probably as well armed as the chap with the mp40.
The Germans were certainly better in their stamping and welding than we were and a lot better in the finishing of such. The Italians had lovely Beretta's , but they were machined and put together by gunsmiths, not Milly down the road. Anyone with any taste would go for the Beretta. Gawd knows what they cost the Italians to make.
 
The Berretta on any other high quality SMG wasn't got to the final prototype stage in 36 days, it wasn't designed to compete with other designs in reliability, quality or looks, so you can't really compare an emergency design with a pre war luxury design.
 
Last edited:
There were both Owen and Austen guns in the Sandhurst collection which I fired in the 70s.. they both worked, but the Owen was better made and seemed more reliable. The vertical feeding magazine no doubt assisted in this and, apart from need an offset sight, did not seem to be a problem in use. Allegedly the Owen was better in close country as the mag did not get caught in brush etc. It was very simply and strongly made with a straightforward "plug in" barrel, which made cleaning easy.

The Austen just seemed to be a slightly better made STEN with two handles..

The thing I remember was that both were painted in camouflage colours, which seems to have been an Aus thing.. I have seen, and used Owens since then, and they have all been painted...
From my reading of it, the Owen was fairly accurate and reliable as it was designed for ease of cleaning in the conditions the Aussies were fighting in.
 
The Berretta on any other high quality SMG wasn't got to the final prototype stage in 36 days, it wasn't designed to compete with other designs in reliability, quality or looks, so you can't really compare an emergency design with a pretty war luxury design.
We had the Lanchester and that was machined steel bronze and walnut. Very nice but expensive. Senior service got them iirc. Sten was "lots and pdq."
Of all the SMG designs, it and the Owen were among the most basic and cheap in design and manufacture. Nowt wrong with that. Does it go bang lots of times and put lots of 9mm out at killing velocity ? Is it easy to make ? Is it cheap ? Crack on.
If you've ever seen those Beretta's, you'd be having it away in 5 seconds. Very well made, nice trigger too. But, as you infer, not a gun you could turn out by the thousands a week with low skilled labour and next to no machining. Stens what we needed , Sten is what we got.
 
The Berretta on any other high quality SMG wasn't got to the final prototype stage in 36 days, it wasn't designed to compete with other designs in reliability, quality or looks, so you can't really compare an emergency design with a pretty war luxury design.
The 'better' STEN when everyone caught their breath was the Patchett, that became the Sterling, so 'superior' to the STEN, the Army felt no need to adopt it for nearly a decade, and the STEN was still around into the 60's.

The STEN did what was required of it, killed people cheaply and fairly efficiently, best part of 5 million made - as Indira Ghandi found.
 
There were both Owen and Austen guns in the Sandhurst collection which I fired in the 70s.. they both worked, but the Owen was better made and seemed more reliable. The vertical feeding magazine no doubt assisted in this and, apart from need an offset sight, did not seem to be a problem in use. Allegedly the Owen was better in close country as the mag did not get caught in brush etc. It was very simply and strongly made with a straightforward "plug in" barrel, which made cleaning easy.

The Austen just seemed to be a slightly better made STEN with two handles..

The thing I remember was that both were painted in camouflage colours, which seems to have been an Aus thing.. I have seen, and used Owens since then, and they have all been painted...
Oz Army still used Owen in Nam, used by British Army on limited issue (for 'them') Malaya to mid 1950's when Stirling came along.
 
Ability not to rust to bits in minutes probably played a part.
One assumes RN use was pretty close to salt water?
On board I'm told. Think they were used by boarding parties, shore patrol and guards when in port. Nice bit of kit if a tad heavy compared with others.
 
We had the Lanchester and that was machined steel bronze and walnut. Very nice but expensive. Senior service got them iirc.
Infamous for the 'Lanchester Dance' if dropped on deck and a bloody big bayonet


iu-5.jpeg
 

Latest Threads

Top