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Large EOD find

HE117

LE
Ooh! 74 Grenades..' Lovely!

All infantry natures.. I wonder how they ended up there..? I suspect they have been stolen by the locals and salted away for a rainy day...
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Ooh! 74 Grenades..' Lovely!

All infantry natures.. I wonder how they ended up there..? I suspect they have been stolen by the locals and salted away for a rainy day...
I noticed a door in one of the boxes, sealed with bitumastic sealant
over in Italy the Partisan movement was much much bigger than the french equivalent, so it may well be one of their caches, no doubt rifles and handguns will turn up nearby, a bit far North for the Commora,
 
I am a firm believer in the need to breed true expertise and not just an ability to follow "doctrine"!

Unfortunately it went that way after 2010 when the High Threat course changed and the focus was entirely on Afghanistan. I know the instructors at the Felix centre weren’t happy at the new requirements. Admittedly I don’t know how things have panned out and it would be unfair to speak ill of current operators.

Provided the AT/ATO trade doesn’t forget its primary purpose is explosive safety it will adapt to change as it always has done.

Retain flexible rigidity.
 
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Another large legacy bomb from WW2 causing a nuisance.

This time a 5 tonne Tallboy dropped by the RAF Dambuster Squadron on April 16, 1945 when it carried out a raid on the German cruiser Lützow, which was anchored in the channel near Szczecin in northwest Poland.

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It missed its target and sank to the bottom of the channel.


Polish naval sappers have now been left with the task of carrying out the biggest ever underwater bomb disposal operation in Europe.



Adding to the difficulty is the fact that the bomb is lying 12 metres underwater, with little visibility and in fast-moving currents.

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The unexploded shell was found last September by workers who were deepening the Piast Channel, which leads from the Baltic port of Świnoujście in north-west Poland towards the large Szczecin Lagoon.



The huge ordinance was identified as a Tallboy, a seismic bomb designed and used by the British to attack underground targets and one of the largest bombs ever dropped in the war.

When it detonated an earthquake effect would shatter its target.

zmveblczyyfixis7huydm.png


The operation will be carried out in two stages. The first one will be the riskiest.

Over one metre of sand will be dug away to level the ground to expose the bomb. During this stage, any movement could trigger the detonators in the bomb.

Bringing the bomb to the surface and taking it out to sea is not an option as it would have to travel through Świnoujście, threatening the whole town.

The specialist divers decided to use deflagration which involves the controlled burning of the explosive inside the bomb below the detonation threshold.



Edited to add that the bomb seems to have spontaneously exploded. Here's the video -

 
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4(T)

LE
Another large legacy bomb from WW2 causing a nuisance.

This time a 5 tonne Tallboy dropped by the RAF Dambuster Squadron on April 16, 1945 when it carried out a raid on the German cruiser Lützow, which was anchored in the channel near Szczecin in northwest Poland.

View attachment 511818View attachment 511819


It missed its target and sank to the bottom of the channel.


Polish naval sappers have now been left with the task of carrying out the biggest ever underwater bomb disposal operation in Europe.



Adding to the difficulty is the fact that the bomb is lying 12 metres underwater, with little visibility and in fast-moving currents.

View attachment 511820
The unexploded shell was found last September by workers who were deepening the Piast Channel, which leads from the Baltic port of Świnoujście in north-west Poland towards the large Szczecin Lagoon.



The huge ordinance was identified as a Tallboy, a seismic bomb designed and used by the British to attack underground targets and one of the largest bombs ever dropped in the war.

When it detonated an earthquake effect would shatter its target.

View attachment 511821

The operation will be carried out in two stages. The first one will be the riskiest.

Over one metre of sand will be dug away to level the ground to expose the bomb. During this stage, any movement could trigger the detonators in the bomb.

Bringing the bomb to the surface and taking it out to sea is not an option as it would have to travel through Świnoujście, threatening the whole town.

The specialist divers decided to use deflagration which involves the controlled burning of the explosive inside the bomb below the detonation threshold.




I'm surprised its only under 1m of silt. What was its terminal velocity - something like 750mph? I'd have thought that the relatively shallow water would have barely slowed it, and that it'd have drilled its way deep underground.


If this one's close to the surface, just how many are littering the seabed around, say, the Tirpitz' old berth?
 

Tyk

LE
I'm surprised its only under 1m of silt. What was its terminal velocity - something like 750mph? I'd have thought that the relatively shallow water would have barely slowed it, and that it'd have drilled its way deep underground.


If this one's close to the surface, just how many are littering the seabed around, say, the Tirpitz' old berth?

If it was found during channel deepening it's quite possible a goodly depth of silt was lifted off it before it was located. Pretty lucky that the dredging didn't cause a bangy event, one of those when new must have been spectacularly destructive.
I guess (the EOD experts please correct me) that treating old ordnance as fully functional (in bang terms) and hyper sensitive in triggering terms is the default approach even though the explosive might have gone off or plain gone.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer

Tyk

LE
Crikey. Glad no one hurt.

No kidding, if any of the divers had been in the water vaguely close to it then that much bang would have been an extremely emotional, if brief, event.

All's well that ended well and I guess they won't have a lot of dredging to do in that bit of the channel for a while.

Edit: @baldbof SNAP!!!
 

HE117

LE
Another large legacy bomb from WW2 causing a nuisance.

This time a 5 tonne Tallboy dropped by the RAF Dambuster Squadron on April 16, 1945 when it carried out a raid on the German cruiser Lützow, which was anchored in the channel near Szczecin in northwest Poland.

View attachment 511818View attachment 511819


It missed its target and sank to the bottom of the channel.


Polish naval sappers have now been left with the task of carrying out the biggest ever underwater bomb disposal operation in Europe.



Adding to the difficulty is the fact that the bomb is lying 12 metres underwater, with little visibility and in fast-moving currents.

View attachment 511820
The unexploded shell was found last September by workers who were deepening the Piast Channel, which leads from the Baltic port of Świnoujście in north-west Poland towards the large Szczecin Lagoon.



The huge ordinance was identified as a Tallboy, a seismic bomb designed and used by the British to attack underground targets and one of the largest bombs ever dropped in the war.

When it detonated an earthquake effect would shatter its target.

View attachment 511821

The operation will be carried out in two stages. The first one will be the riskiest.

Over one metre of sand will be dug away to level the ground to expose the bomb. During this stage, any movement could trigger the detonators in the bomb.

Bringing the bomb to the surface and taking it out to sea is not an option as it would have to travel through Świnoujście, threatening the whole town.

The specialist divers decided to use deflagration which involves the controlled burning of the explosive inside the bomb below the detonation threshold.


Deflagrating Torpex?

.... that could be interesting!
 

HE117

LE
What was it we say?

“Never attempt a low order unless you’re prepared to accept the risk of a high order”

Do you think perhaps they didn’t check with EODTIC to find out what the fill was?

And you also have to put in place mitigation for worst case scenario, which defeats any benefit of using an alternative technique.

Ive done it once, on my upgrading course. I’ve never heard of anyone doing it on a job.
 
I'm surprised its only under 1m of silt. What was its terminal velocity - something like 750mph? I'd have thought that the relatively shallow water would have barely slowed it, and that it'd have drilled its way deep underground.


If this one's close to the surface, just how many are littering the seabed around, say, the Tirpitz' old berth?
When they hit they sometimes do strange things.

I was a on a job in Thetford when the bomb was supposed to have entered the ground and exited some distance away and reentered the ground (much shallower).

We found the fin remnants and followed the trail down for some depth... and then followed it back up.
 
Ah..!

Yes.. well, perhaps not an RSP to repeat then..?


...at least it wasn't a GS!

They put the chance of detonation at 50/50. Two things strike me with this

1. They didn’t really understand the munition they were dealing with, especially the make up of the explosive fill.

2. At 50/50 you’re readily accepting either outcome, not striving for a preferred option. Cut and burn is an old and quite simplistic/blunt technique in terms of application. It’s also slow and a pain in the arse, I suspect more so underwater - why did they even bother.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Suppose that bit of channel won't need anymore dredging.
No, but the soon to be opened Karsibor jumbo Carp pond needs stocking urgently...
 
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