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Land Rover horror stories

Agreed, but I got a feeling those at JLR aren’t really interested in the original users of Land Rover. ie Military/Farmers etc. The just want the Chelsea tractor set and the up market set!
The problem is , the public buy it because of its history and image as a tough can do vehicle , that's why its fashionable and cool yo them. Without that reputation it's just going to be a a fashion fad and will be forgotten about but I don't think that's even going to happen.
Remember when the first BMW x5 came out ? They were the in thing and everyone had one... for 2 years or do until something else came along that was fashionable.
I dont think even that will happen though, I haven't seen a new defender once on the road.
 
The problem is , the public buy it because of its history and image as a tough can do vehicle , that's why its fashionable and cool yo them. Without that reputation it's just going to be a a fashion fad and will be forgotten about but I don't think that's even going to happen.
Remember when the first BMW x5 came out ? They were the in thing and everyone had one... for 2 years or do until something else came along that was fashionable.
I dont think even that will happen though, I haven't seen a new defender once on the road.
We got one here in Lowestoft, I still think it’s Chelsea Tractor and looks shit!
 
1990 was the introduction of that silly new name, to differentiate between the Discovery and other new SUVs. *spit* The beginning of the end.
The 90 and 110 was introduced in 1984 and was still called "Land Rover" until 1990.

As you can see, I'm old school and drive a 1987 110 Land Rover (still going strong- well as much as a knackered old Land Rover can).
Well I beg to differ, not on the silly name, it is indeed rather sad - sounded like some kind of moulded action figure with bulgy muscles and a homoerotic codpiece. But along with the wanky name it got the Tdi engines, what the 90/110 had needed from the start.
Tdi Defenders are mechanically pretty damn good and make a viable daily driver even today, don’t cost the earth to service because they have no damn electronics to suddenly send you down a financial rabbit hole. Still leaky and uncomfortable of course.
 

4(T)

LE
My Freelander 2 is one of the infamous '07 batch. Mine is very low mileage for the year (70k) and in reasonably mint, well maintained condition.

Last year it started developing the dreaded "HDC system fault" computer error that immobilises the vehicle. Occasional non-starts at first, but this summer it developed into full "don't turn off the engine mid-journey" mode. (Stopped for a quick stretch during a 200 mile round trip; still stuck in the lay-by two hours later when it decided to start again...).

The LR user forums are filled with hundreds of threads about this system error. Dealer diagnostics don't point to the error source, so punters have tried replacing/fixing just about every sensor, earth connection and module in their cars - with variable results.

Local main dealer has told me about £1k just to investigate. Given that they couldn't spot a broken rear brake arm ("the handbrake cable is out of adjustment. It'll all have to be replaced."), I declined. Local LR specialist/enthusiast dealer has had the wagon for a month (of course it bloody won't fault every time he wants to work on it...).

Latest news is that he has obtained some inside track info from JLR that should point to the fault.


What is galling is that JLR HQ evidently know exactly what the problem is, as whatever it is was fixed on the '08 production onwards. Being cynical, one would assume the problem and its solution has not been made public in order to avoid liability for the thousands of vehicles affected.
 
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WALT

War Hero
But along with the wanky name it got the Tdi engines, what the 90/110 had needed from the start.

I have a confession to make...........my '87 used to have the marvelous 2.5 turbo but had had a 200 tdi transplant before I got it, so I agree with your comments.
My first 110 (which I still have- but have knicked so many parts that I'm not sure it's a viable rebuild) also had the crap 2.5. I got so fed up with rebuilding it every year, that after its last death, I swapped it for a V8. Brilliant engine and great fun. Sadly, I cried every time I went to the fuel station.
I've had the 200 tdi now for well over five years and had no problems with it, so having said that, I'm expecting it to dump several liters of oil tomorrow....
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
The time to worry with a TDi is when it's not leaking oil - it means it's empty.
 
I have a confession to make...........my '87 used to have the marvelous 2.5 turbo but had had a 200 tdi transplant before I got it, so I agree with your comments.
My first 110 (which I still have- but have knicked so many parts that I'm not sure it's a viable rebuild) also had the crap 2.5. I got so fed up with rebuilding it every year, that after its last death, I swapped it for a V8. Brilliant engine and great fun. Sadly, I cried every time I went to the fuel station.
I've had the 200 tdi now for well over five years and had no problems with it, so having said that, I'm expecting it to dump several liters of oil tomorrow....
Me too. Mine also came with the Turbo D (19J) engine, it melted basically, ("Marvellous" Hah!) and I now have a 200Tdi out of a Discovery. Mine is also a "bitsa" it's comprised of parts from about five different vehicles.
Mine only leaks from the rocker cover gasket, can never get that right.
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
I had a D2 TD5 for 5 years.

I reckon the TD5 would go for ever if it wasn't for leaking fuel pressure regulators, plastic dowels, injector seals and a couple of dozen other things.

And rusty brake pipes, broken coil springs, dodgy bushes etc etc.
 
My 1983 110 came with a 2286 cc petrol. That was replaced with a 2.5 petrol when it died.
I see comments about the new defender not having enough power, even with 200 bhp and 317 lb ft of torque it is more powerful than any engine fitted to an old defender. Plus now if you want you can have silly engine power. I remember the first time I drove a TD5, that was a rocket compared to the old 2.5 NA diesel we had on the line at the time.

RP.
 
Well I beg to differ, not on the silly name, it is indeed rather sad - sounded like some kind of moulded action figure with bulgy muscles and a homoerotic codpiece. But along with the wanky name it got the Tdi engines, what the 90/110 had needed from the start.
Tdi Defenders are mechanically pretty damn good and make a viable daily driver even today, don’t cost the earth to service because they have no damn electronics to suddenly send you down a financial rabbit hole. Still leaky and uncomfortable of course.
Just put a decent engine in......for the price of a new Hi Lux ......Engine Conversions.
 
The time to worry with a TDi is when it's not leaking oil - it means it's empty.


If I remember rightly, TDi's were designed to be able to run for 20 minutes with no oil pressure without failure.
I've seen two survive running upside down for several minutes with no ill effects
 
What is galling is that JLR HQ evidently know exactly what the problem is, as whatever it is was fixed on the '08 production onwards. Being cynical, one would assume the problem and its solution has not been made public in order to avoid liability for the thousands of vehicles affected.
It's called "Fix as Fail" all manufacturers do the same thing..... they know full well there is an issue but only X % will fail so they don't issue a recall or rectification and if the odds are the item won't fail under base warranty then they can walk away.....
Some manufacturers are worse than others for doing this but it all comes down to money .....
A mate just had the gearbox fail on his Ford Ranger a week out of warranty and Ford couldn't care less despite it having an impeccable service history ....
 
It's called "Fix as Fail" all manufacturers do the same thing..... they know full well there is an issue but only X % will fail so they don't issue a recall or rectification and if the odds are the item won't fail under base warranty then they can walk away.....
Some manufacturers are worse than others for doing this but it all comes down to money .....
A mate just had the gearbox fail on his Ford Ranger a week out of warranty and Ford couldn't care less despite it having an impeccable service history ....
Its worth noting that as far as trading standards / the law is concerned there is no set time for warranty on any goods , goods have to last a reasonable amount of time and the person you gave your money to is responsible (the main agent) , not the manufacturer , if your mates Ranger has been properly serviced and doesn't have starship mileage I`d kick off big time and threaten to serve a county court summons , this usually works.

Most people dont have a clue and accept what they are told by the garage/shop where they purchased the goods from , "The manufacturers warranty has expired " is the usual come back , this is irrelevant as you didn't pay the manufacturer for the goods , you paid the garage/shop .
 
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Just put a decent engine in......for the price of a new Hi Lux ......Engine Conversions.
The Tdi is a decent engine, the Ford ones after seem a bit more of a mixed bag.
Engine conversions were a big thing before the Defender got it’s name plus the Tdi, they are still around though partly for things like putting in the bigger Ford 3.2 diesel as opposed to the 2.2 that latter Defenders came with, and partly for doing things like putting Corvette V8 engines into a vehicle with soft, long travel suspension. That’ll end well.
Although the 4 cylinder Mustang engine in the link actually kind of makes sense in a mad way.
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
I drove a 200tdi (underpowered and agricultural but very durable), a 300tdi (less agricultural and pulled better than the 200) and finally a TD5 which was much more powerful but could be flat at low revs - easily cured by a remap. Of the engines I drove I would say that the TD5 was the best in that it was virtually unbreakable and would rattle along happily. There is a ready market for TD5s from rotten LRs which are modified and transplanted into boats.
 
The Tdi is a decent engine, the Ford ones after seem a bit more of a mixed bag.
Engine conversions were a big thing before the Defender got it’s name plus the Tdi, they are still around though partly for things like putting in the bigger Ford 3.2 diesel as opposed to the 2.2 that latter Defenders came with, and partly for doing things like putting Corvette V8 engines into a vehicle with soft, long travel suspension. That’ll end well.
Although the 4 cylinder Mustang engine in the link actually kind of makes sense in a mad way.
The TD5 is not a good engine , I used to sell LR parts and frequently sold cylinder heads , fuel system parts ,injector looms , turbos, alternators , PAS pumps , waterpumps , generally they were not for high mileage vehicles .
 
The TD5 is not a good engine , I used to sell LR parts and frequently sold cylinder heads , fuel system parts ,injector looms , turbos, alternators , PAS pumps , waterpumps , generally they were not for high mileage vehicles .


Early TD5's had some teething troubles (in large part down to BMW penny pinching

Once the initial issues like plastic head dowels were sorted it was a damned good engine, I've had a few and never broken a TD5 despite serious hooliganism and outright abuse.

Take browse around Ebay and have a look at the mileages on discovery 2's up for sale.

Nothing wrong with the TD5 that fooking off BMW wouldn't have fixed
 

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