Land Rover horror stories

Oops

War Hero
Too be fair a lot of those hoses are really a one use fitting...... and given age and heat cycles work hardening the alloy have done well to last 30 years .....
On many modern tractors all the high pressure metal pipes are officially one use only and have to be replaced if removed....often not done but that's the factory line .....nothing to do with parts sales either as it comes direct from Bosch
Funny you should say that...
Sisu 4 cyl tier4/5(?) Engines will happily belt out 200hp at the shaft....
They don't after suckin' a bit of that green slimy biodiesel cac, swilling around in the bottom of an customers old steel diesel tank...
I stopped asking after £9k, injector pipes at £140 apiece seemed a veritable bargain!
 

RBMK

Old-Salt
One of the problems with most Italian engines from the 80s is the use of a mixture of alloy and steel parts. I suspect that the nipple has welded itself to the fuel rail due to electrolysis between the two different metals.

I used to have the same issue with the Dolomite 1850 / Sprint / Stag engines where the steel bits became almost inseparable from the alloy heads and blocks after a few years, especially if some stupid bar stweard had used the wrong antifreeze (Bluecol AA was specified) or else hadn't changed the anti-freeze in 10 years.
 

TamH70

MIA
One of the problems with most Italian engines from the 80s is the use of a mixture of alloy and steel parts. I suspect that the nipple has welded itself to the fuel rail due to electrolysis between the two different metals.

I used to have the same issue with the Dolomite 1850 / Sprint / Stag engines where the steel bits became almost inseparable from the alloy heads and blocks after a few years, especially if some stupid bar stweard had used the wrong antifreeze (Bluecol AA was specified) or else hadn't changed the anti-freeze in 10 years.
Differential metal corrosion? I have heard that that is a pretty common problem in the car industry.
 

cymraeg

War Hero
Hit the arches and chassis with red oxide today followed by waxoyl underseal and did the rear axle in a matt black rust killer paint.

Apart from minor surface ginger freckles she is surprisingly solid for an 18 year old truck.

Next is the engine conversion following its top end rebuild and single mass flywheel conversion doodah
 
Funny you should say that...
Sisu 4 cyl tier4/5(?) Engines will happily belt out 200hp at the shaft....
They don't after suckin' a bit of that green slimy biodiesel cac, swilling around in the bottom of an customers old steel diesel tank...
I stopped asking after £9k, injector pipes at £140 apiece seemed a veritable bargain!
I spend a lot of time ....and even more since they went to B7 Bio in red .....explaining to customers that buying a new bunded tank and putting a filter on the hose will be a lot cheaper than leaving their 30 plus year old metal tank in situ and me sorting out the little "it got a bit low so I raised the back of the tank" issue when their JCB or tractor won't start after filling up with fuel .

Have customers who were getting less than 50 hours to a set of combine fuel filters last year...

JCB common rail engines are very susceptible to bad or contaminated fuel .....

Officially on most makes if you have fuel contamination then every component in the fuel system must be changed .....pump, injectors , rail , pipe work , tank (some will allow a chemical clean ) so can see how you got to 9K plus ...

I have done this job on one Dairy farm JCB more than once as they didn't listen and continued to fill it occasionally from cans .....often old dairy chemical 20L cans .... You can only do so much.....;-)
 
I used to work as a mechanic in a place that was also a petrol station. The boss was a dodgy ****** and one week we had a delivery of petrol that was like frog spawn and every car that filled up never made it off of the forecourt..
One was a brand new Merc, and the mechanic from the dealer wanted to replace everything.
Injectors, fuel lines, Catalyist, even the tank.
I drained the tank and took it for a good spin and all was fine.
 

Oops

War Hero
I spend a lot of time ....and even more since they went to B7 Bio in red .....explaining to customers that buying a new bunded tank and putting a filter on the hose will be a lot cheaper than leaving their 30 plus year old metal tank in situ and me sorting out the little "it got a bit low so I raised the back of the tank" issue when their JCB or tractor won't start after filling up with fuel .

Have customers who were getting less than 50 hours to a set of combine fuel filters last year...

JCB common rail engines are very susceptible to bad or contaminated fuel .....

Officially on most makes if you have fuel contamination then every component in the fuel system must be changed .....pump, injectors , rail , pipe work , tank (some will allow a chemical clean ) so can see how you got to 9K plus ...

I have done this job on one Dairy farm JCB more than once as they didn't listen and continued to fill it occasionally from cans .....often old dairy chemical 20L cans .... You can only do so much.....;-)
I learned early and young....
5 gal popcorn (proprionic acid to non welly wearers) drums were really heavy duty..... great for dieseling up tractors off farm.
£283 for a Lucas pump rebuild, plus a set of injectors cured that notion back in the 80's.

To be fair this time, our insurance stood it, and said they'd pursue the fella who supplied the fuel on the job's insurance..
Dunno the outcome, but I felt bloody pious showing em our bunded plassy tank with 20? Micron filters in place.

Dairy farms and machinery.. a great combination for an Ag. Engineer....
Cowshit, Ignorance and Brass....
You'll never be short of work, just dont tell em there's such things as greaseguns/dipsticks/ operators manuals, etc.
 
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A friend of mine landed his training aircraft,with a student on board, when the engine cut out on short finals and couldn't be restarted. When he opened the filler cap,there was fuel present but giving off a suspicious smell. He normally refuels from drums that match the size of the aircraft's tank and had just refilled them with Mogas from a nearby petrol station,not one of the larger well known companies. He sent a sample for analysis to a company in the UK. When I met him,he invited me to smell the dodgy fuel and asked me what I thought was in there. First thing that came to mind was acetone. The analysis said "among other things, acetone, kerosene,diesel,benzene..."
All of the fuel pipes and the carburettors had to be changed out.
 
Differential metal corrosion? I have heard that that is a pretty common problem in the car industry.
Bigger problem on boats, but they know and apply isolating measures

I often think car mechanical tech is ~20 to 30 years behind marine and motorcycle

@Ravers

Cut existing fitting off pipe and install a new flair nut to match hose
 
And a glob of silicon just to be sure, to be sure!
Not bath type RTV Silicone Sealant, it's gaskets only - leave to set before tightening

Rhodorseal much better, or non silicone Hylomar Blue or Aerograde PL32
 
A friend of mine landed his training aircraft,with a student on board, when the engine cut out on short finals and couldn't be restarted. When he opened the filler cap,there was fuel present but giving off a suspicious smell. He normally refuels from drums that match the size of the aircraft's tank and had just refilled them with Mogas from a nearby petrol station,not one of the larger well known companies. He sent a sample for analysis to a company in the UK. When I met him,he invited me to smell the dodgy fuel and asked me what I thought was in there. First thing that came to mind was acetone. The analysis said "among other things, acetone, kerosene,diesel,benzene..."
All of the fuel pipes and the carburettors had to be changed out.
Yet carcinogenic, absorbed through skin, benzene is what we now have in petrol instead of lead
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Went into one of the group workshops today, I was confronted by this abomination
1594057385079.jpeg

1594057352551.jpeg


Bleuuuch!
 
I learned early and young....
5 gal popcorn (proprionic acid to non welly wearers) drums were really heavy duty..... great for dieseling up tractors off farm.
£283 for a Lucas pump rebuild, plus a set of injectors cured that notion back in the 80's.

To be fair this time, our insurance stood it, and said they'd pursue the fella who supplied the fuel on the job's insurance..
Dunno the outcome, but I felt bloody pious showing em our bunded plassy tank with 20? Micron filters in place.

Dairy farms and machinery.. a great combination for an Ag. Engineer....
Cowshit, Ignorance and Brass....
You'll never be short of work, just dont tell em there's such things as greaseguns/dipsticks/ operators manuals, etc.

I get misfuelling a couple of times a year at work, the current trend is to fill the fuel tank with Adblue
Usually at dark o'clock but generally not to far from the yard thankfully.

Its okay of they don't start the engine.
If they do the bill is usually over a grand by the time you've had it recovered and sorted.
If they don't start it then its just recovery and /or fuel drain.
 

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