Labour's Failed Propaganda ...

Decades of painting the tories as the nasty party and the party of the selfish has unravelled in the last few days. The bleating of the likes of Charlotte Church, Russell Brand etc about the next five years of evil is simply not founded on fact - and cameron should focus some effort on reversing the picture of snooty toffs in tails, quaffing campers at the expense of the rest of us. Because Labour lied endlessly over the last six months and it would do the Tories the world of good to expose those lies clearly and to articulate why Labour cocked it up and they lost so many seats.

Despite what they say:

  • Our standard of living has increased (and grew under the coalition despite the Labour propaganda - see here: http://www.theguardian.com/.../dec/11/uk-living-standards-eu). The UK’s standard of living in 2013 was 15% higher than the average for the 28 member states of the EU, and was up one place from the year before. Luxembourg came top (36% higher than average) followed by Germany (22%) and Austria (20%). Four nations, Denmark, Sweden, Finland and the UK were then jointly ranked in fourth place.
  • Inequality - Most indications suggest that inequality rose significantly under Labour and is decreasing under the current regime - the Gini coefficient, for example, knocks Milliband's claims of an increasing inequality in the UK (http://www.ifs.org.uk/docs/ER_JC_2013.pdf) The IFS concluded that “it is fair to say that youth unemployment and income inequality have risen under Labour”. The gini coefficient, which measures inequality of income or wealth, actually increased during the New Labour years. In other words, the gap between top and bottom widened.
Labour's handing of economic issues was, by and large, poor:
  • General - they broke the state by redistributing (good) but through tax credits (bad) instead of ensuring companies paid a living wage. And it did so by stealth rather than with public consent. Labour MPs cheered when Brown lowered taxes and undermined the state still further. Then, when the banks collapsed and caused the crash – because of Labour's light touch regulation, Brown used the state to save the day. But by then it was too late; it was the last gasp of a failed model.
  • No money in the coffers - even Labour admit they left the chests empty - a pity, because if they hadn't there would probably be no need for quite the cuts across departments (not just welfare) that are happening. And, of course, if they hadn't borrowed so much, the repayments would not be costing us so much...as we all now, after three years of prudence, Gordon Brown switched tactics in 2000 and committed himself to a massive, audacious project: the Europeanisation of the British economy. He set out to shift our political centre of gravity, from being the ‘third way’ between the EU and the US and becoming an EU-style country with a massive government and masses of people dependant on that government. This was the Brown project. So the years 2000-10 saw the size of the state soar from 37pc to 50pc – a rise of 13 points. This is a faster rise than any other country, over any other postwar decade. And half of the damage was done by 2007, before the crash. See here: http://www.theguardian.com/.../deficit-debt-government...
  • Labour's inefficiency It was all so inefficient and wasteful – not just PFI and the mindless national IT schemes but using the state to mop up the mess created by free markets; dealing with endless symptoms of inequality while never addressing the causes. Labour was always running up the down escalator, letting those at the top do what they wanted while using the state to clear up behind them and never demanding a penny.
  • Immigration - Labour failed to realise the impact of immigration, didn't pay enough attention to the kind of low paid work people are doing and treating problems rather than preventing them, according to the man leading Ed Miliband's policy review.
  • Give-to-take-back' tax credits - Created in 1999, reformed in 2000, tax credits have led to millions of low-income families having to pay back the Treasury after over-payment, at the cost of huge financial and emotional strain. Meanwhile, 40% of workers and families owed tax credits left billions unclaimed in the 2008/9 tax year for fear of being chased for the cash later on.
  • Abolition of the 10p tax rate - "We made two mistakes [in scrapping the 10p tax rate in 2007]," Brown told Radio 4's Today programme. "We didn't cover as well as we should have ...low-paid workers...[or] the 60 to 64-year-olds who didn't get the pensioner's tax allowance." Accountants calculated abolishing the 10% tax rate, coupled with a withdrawal of tax credits from higher earners, would leave 1.8 million workers earning £6,500 to £15,000 effectively paying a tax rate of up to 70%.
  • 0% corporation tax - In 2002, Brown announced a 0% rate of corporation tax on profits below £10,000 to help small businesses. Overnight, sole traders such as taxi drivers and plumbers transformed themselves into limited companies to take advantage of the new rules. A Treasury minister later said "the Government did not realise how many people would engage in abusive tax avoidance", despite it being "blindingly obvious" to tax experts. Brown raised the rate from 0% to 19% when he released how much money was being lost.
  • Taxing pension fund dividend payments - Before 1997, dividends issued by UK companies and paid to pension funds were tax-free - that is, the tax could be claimed back via tax credits. Tax relief was scrapped when Labour got in, slashing the amount collected by pension funds by around £5bn a year. Pension funds have lost around £100bn over the last 12 years as a result.
  • Bending to the banks - Asked in an ITV1 interview about his mistakes, the PM said: "In the 1990s, the banks....all came to us and said, 'Look, we don't want to be regulated, we want to be free of regulation'.
  • "All the complaints I was getting was, 'Look, you're regulating them too much'. And actually the truth is globally and nationally we should have been regulating them more. "So I've learnt from that...you don't listen to the industry when they say, 'This is good for us'." Horse. Door. Bolted, anyone?
  • Flogging the family jewels - In May 1999, Brown had an idea to sell-off more than half of our national gold reserves - a total of 395 tonnes - at a time when the price of gold had slumped after a decade of stagnation. The family jewels went for an average price of $275 per ounce. On the Forex Gold Index today, the precious metal is trading at $1151.25 an ounce, nearly five times as much. To be fair to Brown, he invested the money from his badly-timed bullion sale in dollars, euros and yen, which have all done better than sterling since then - though none as good as gold.
  • The (un)Holy Trinity of tripartite financial regulation - The system of financial regulation dividing powers between the Treasury, the Bank of England and the Financial Services Authority, established in 2000 missed what amounted to the biggest financial crisis of our lifetime.
  • Ignoring the wisdom of Vince Cable (when he had a useful brain, which got removed on promotion to cabinet)- In the House of Commons in 2003, the Lib Dem's Vince Cable asked Brown: "Is it not true...the growth of the British economy is sustained by consumer spending pinned against record levels of personal debt, which is secured, if at all, against house prices the Bank of England describes as well above equilibrium level?" Brown replied: "The Honourable Gentleman has been writing articles in the newspapers, as reflected in his contribution, that spread alarm, without substance, about the state of the economy..." The rest, as they say, is history.
  • edited to add - As neatly pointed out below - 60 billion pounds spent on two needless wars of aggression and the fact our military's international reputation and our country's moral one ended upon their watch as well. And too many dead and injured men.

It's a very different picture from the rosy picture that the Labour party would like to have us see - the nasty tories destroying lives and leading us to damnation The tories get it right all the time and some of their policies will hurt some people. But the same's true for the socialists. However, the poor record of the last socialist government is clear for all to see - even the Guardian and some Labour politicians admit it. And that is a problem that they are going to have to address in their stretegic thinking over the next five years.

In the meantime, it would do no harm to ram this message down the throats of the whinging socialists like Brandt, Church, Toynbee, and the stupid cow I met on Saturday who was in floods of tears about the next five years and who commented that a. we were heading for damnation and poverty and b. the electorate were stupid.
 
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I'm a complete and utter twat, with no scruples.......

I could do with the money (and the brown envelopes)

Where do I apply for leadership of the Labour Party?

Come to that, I'd be a Limp Dem if the money was right........ I'd even shoot a dog or two...... leg- shagging, bottom- sniffing bastards.
 
I'm a complete and utter twat, with no scruples.......

I could do with the money (and the brown envelopes)

Where do I apply for leadership of the Labour Party?

Come to that, I'd be a Limp Dem if the money was right........ I'd even shoot a dog or two...... leg- shagging, bottom- sniffing bastards.

Ever done a day's work in your life? If so, you're over-qualified and you can shove it up your arse.
 
Decades of painting the tories as the nasty party and the party of the selfish has unravelled in the last few days. The bleating of the likes of Charlotte Church, Russell Brand etc about the next five years of evil is simply not founded on fact - and cameron should focus some effort on reversing the picture of snooty toffs in tails, quaffing campers at the expense of the rest of us. Because Labour lied endlessly over the last six months and it would do the Tories the world of good to expose those lies clearly and to articulate why Labour cocked it up and they lost so many seats.

Despite what they say:

  • Our standard of living has increased (and grew under the coalition despite the Labour propaganda - see here: http://www.theguardian.com/.../dec/11/uk-living-standards-eu). The UK’s standard of living in 2013 was 15% higher than the average for the 28 member states of the EU, and was up one place from the year before. Luxembourg came top (36% higher than average) followed by Germany (22%) and Austria (20%). Four nations, Denmark, Sweden, Finland and the UK were then jointly ranked in fourth place.
  • Inequality - Most indications suggest that inequality rose significantly under Labour and is decreasing under the current regime - the Gini coefficient, for example, knocks Milliband's claims of an increasing inequality in the UK (http://www.ifs.org.uk/docs/ER_JC_2013.pdf) The IFS concluded that “it is fair to say that youth unemployment and income inequality have risen under Labour”. The gini coefficient, which measures inequality of income or wealth, actually increased during the New Labour years. In other words, the gap between top and bottom widened.
Labour's handing of economic issues was, by and large, poor:
  • General - they broke the state by redistributing (good) but through tax credits (bad) instead of ensuring companies paid a living wage. And it did so by stealth rather than with public consent. Labour MPs cheered when Brown lowered taxes and undermined the state still further. Then, when the banks collapsed and caused the crash – because of Labour's light touch regulation, Brown used the state to save the day. But by then it was too late; it was the last gasp of a failed model.
  • No money in the coffers - even Labour admit they left the chests empty - a pity, because if they hadn't there would probably be no need for quite the cuts across departments (not just welfare) that are happening. And, of course, if they hadn't borrowed so much, the repayments would not be costing us so much...as we all now, after three years of prudence, Gordon Brown switched tactics in 2000 and committed himself to a massive, audacious project: the Europeanisation of the British economy. He set out to shift our political centre of gravity, from being the ‘third way’ between the EU and the US and becoming an EU-style country with a massive government and masses of people dependant on that government. This was the Brown project. So the years 2000-10 saw the size of the state soar from 37pc to 50pc – a rise of 13 points. This is a faster rise than any other country, over any other postwar decade. And half of the damage was done by 2007, before the crash. See here: http://www.theguardian.com/.../deficit-debt-government...
  • Labour's inefficiency It was all so inefficient and wasteful – not just PFI and the mindless national IT schemes but using the state to mop up the mess created by free markets; dealing with endless symptoms of inequality while never addressing the causes. Labour was always running up the down escalator, letting those at the top do what they wanted while using the state to clear up behind them and never demanding a penny.
  • Immigration - Labour failed to realise the impact of immigration, didn't pay enough attention to the kind of low paid work people are doing and treating problems rather than preventing them, according to the man leading Ed Miliband's policy review.
  • Give-to-take-back' tax credits - Created in 1999, reformed in 2000, tax credits have led to millions of low-income families having to pay back the Treasury after over-payment, at the cost of huge financial and emotional strain. Meanwhile, 40% of workers and families owed tax credits left billions unclaimed in the 2008/9 tax year for fear of being chased for the cash later on.
  • Abolition of the 10p tax rate - "We made two mistakes [in scrapping the 10p tax rate in 2007]," Brown told Radio 4's Today programme. "We didn't cover as well as we should have ...low-paid workers...[or] the 60 to 64-year-olds who didn't get the pensioner's tax allowance." Accountants calculated abolishing the 10% tax rate, coupled with a withdrawal of tax credits from higher earners, would leave 1.8 million workers earning £6,500 to £15,000 effectively paying a tax rate of up to 70%.
  • 0% corporation tax - In 2002, Brown announced a 0% rate of corporation tax on profits below £10,000 to help small businesses. Overnight, sole traders such as taxi drivers and plumbers transformed themselves into limited companies to take advantage of the new rules. A Treasury minister later said "the Government did not realise how many people would engage in abusive tax avoidance", despite it being "blindingly obvious" to tax experts. Brown raised the rate from 0% to 19% when he released how much money was being lost.
  • Taxing pension fund dividend payments - Before 1997, dividends issued by UK companies and paid to pension funds were tax-free - that is, the tax could be claimed back via tax credits. Tax relief was scrapped when Labour got in, slashing the amount collected by pension funds by around £5bn a year. Pension funds have lost around £100bn over the last 12 years as a result.
  • Bending to the banks - Asked in an ITV1 interview about his mistakes, the PM said: "In the 1990s, the banks....all came to us and said, 'Look, we don't want to be regulated, we want to be free of regulation'.
  • "All the complaints I was getting was, 'Look, you're regulating them too much'. And actually the truth is globally and nationally we should have been regulating them more. "So I've learnt from that...you don't listen to the industry when they say, 'This is good for us'." Horse. Door. Bolted, anyone?
  • Flogging the family jewels - In May 1999, Brown had an idea to sell-off more than half of our national gold reserves - a total of 395 tonnes - at a time when the price of gold had slumped after a decade of stagnation. The family jewels went for an average price of $275 per ounce. On the Forex Gold Index today, the precious metal is trading at $1151.25 an ounce, nearly five times as much. To be fair to Brown, he invested the money from his badly-timed bullion sale in dollars, euros and yen, which have all done better than sterling since then - though none as good as gold.
  • The (un)Holy Trinity of tripartite financial regulation - The system of financial regulation dividing powers between the Treasury, the Bank of England and the Financial Services Authority, established in 2000 missed what amounted to the biggest financial crisis of our lifetime.
  • Ignoring the wisdom of Vince Cable (when he had a useful brain, which got removed on promotion to cabinet)- In the House of Commons in 2003, the Lib Dem's Vince Cable asked Brown: "Is it not true...the growth of the British economy is sustained by consumer spending pinned against record levels of personal debt, which is secured, if at all, against house prices the Bank of England describes as well above equilibrium level?" Brown replied: "The Honourable Gentleman has been writing articles in the newspapers, as reflected in his contribution, that spread alarm, without substance, about the state of the economy..." The rest, as they say, is history.

It's a very different picture from the rosy picture that the Labour party would like to have us see - the nasty tories destroying lives and leading us to damnation The tories get it right all the time and some of their policies will hurt some people. But the same's true for the socialists. However, the poor record of the last socialist government is clear for all to see - even the Guardian and some Labour politicians admit it. And that is a problem that they are going to have to address in their stretegic thinking over the next five years.

In the meantime, it would do no harm to ram this message down the throats of the whinging socialists like Brandt, Church, Toynbee, and the stupid cow I met on Saturday who was in floods of tears about the next five years and who commented that a. we were heading for damnation and poverty and b. the electorate were stupid.

Nice piece but you missed the 60 billion pounds spent on two needless wars of aggression and the fact our militarys international reputation and our countrys moral one ended upon their watch as well.
 
I must confess to being a bit dumb as well. As I didn't vote for Ed Miliband's socialist utopia. Oh well.
 
Nice piece but you missed the 60 billion pounds spent on two needless wars of agression and the fact our militarys international reputation and our countrys moral one ended upon their watch as well.
Who are you going to pin the illiteracy on?
 
Not to mention that the gold reserves sold by the one eyed clown at rock bottom price, would be worth 6 times as much today.
 
Not to mention that the gold reserves sold by the one eyed clown at rock bottom price, would be worth 6 times as much today.
See in the OP:
Flogging the family jewels - In May 1999, Brown had an idea to sell-off more than half of our national gold reserves - a total of 395 tonnes - at a time when the price of gold had slumped after a decade of stagnation. The family jewels went for an average price of $275 per ounce. On the Forex Gold Index today, the precious metal is trading at $1151.25 an ounce, nearly five times as much. To be fair to Brown, he invested the money from his badly-timed bullion sale in dollars, euros and yen, which have all done better than sterling since then - though none as good as gold.
 
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Decades of painting the tories as the nasty party and the party of the selfish has unravelled in the last few days. .............................

Despite what they say:
...........................
  • Immigration - Labour failed to realise the impact of immigration, didn't pay enough attention to the kind of low paid work people are doing and treating problems rather than preventing them, according to the man leading Ed Miliband's policy review.
............................

In the meantime, it would do no harm to ram this message down the throats of the whinging socialists like Brandt, Church, Toynbee, and the stupid cow I met on Saturday who was in floods of tears about the next five years and who commented that a. we were heading for damnation and poverty and b. the electorate were stupid.

On Immigration - they had to open the floodgates because:

1. There were not enough indigenous people qualified to do the skilled jobs.
2. There were not enough indigenous people wanting to do the unskilled jobs.

Both the above due to years of socialist policies in education and the welfare state.
 
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On Immigration - they had to open the floodgates because:

1. There were not enough indigenous people qualified to do the skilled jobs.
2. There were not enough indigenous people wanting to do the unskilled jobs.

Both the above due to years of socialist policies in education and the welfare state.

The old chesnut about 'brits not wanting to do the dirty jobs', that itself is a convenient Labour cliche/term its also mildly racist and no doubt very irritating to people that do these shit jobs and have done long before our borders were thrown open.

The country managed without them before then all of a sudden we 'needed them' give your head a shake. Labour wanted a multi cultural country they made no secret of it, it was also a convenient way of importing cheap labour the result being it also has driven down wages of many those indigenous folk you mention,after all if a person comes from some ex soviet flea pit country like perhaps Poland they are hardly like to turn down the offer of the same work for quadruple the wage are they?.
 
Put succinctly, the party of the working class did the working class out of many of the jobs which used to sustain it.
But working class is a crass term. Who are the working class? If you ask Vhurch Brand and the north london eliet they are this poor, down trodden mass who have no voice except the soclially aware champayne swilling celeb attention seeker. The true working class these days are in fact people who have to work/earn an income by turning up, day after day, and producing something to live. Some earn more than others and some have more desposable income but still need employment to make their way in life and not depend on the state for handouts.
The working class are not actors, footballers or singers who earn riddiculose sums of money for not much work/effort, who use social media to engage in meglamania and self importance. They are taxpayers and the backbone of this country wh o have voted as they see fit and what is best for their future.
Deal with it Church/Brand.

And relax!
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Well, in many cases the 'working' class don't so it's something of a misnomer. It used to mean low- and unskilled/manual workers - the stock I'm from. But it also includes the lower middle classes in my mind.

A good friend, a former Labour man, made a good point over a couple of beers on Saturday: it used to be that the ambition of people was to become a social class up from where they started. So, for example, getting off the shop floor and into management... getting your kids into college and being professionals - not having to graft or get dirty like you did.

That's gone. Labour has turned being ashamed of success into an art form. You have to feel guilty for doing well. You're supposed to accept that you deserve no more than the feckless and idle. If you are talented, you're to feel guilty for being blessed with earning potential.

There was an article in the Telegraph over the weekend which talked about how people are 'ashamed' to admit voting Tory. The Left has so hijacked the moral ground in the media that to be Conservative is to be everything evil... which is nonsense but it's where we are. There's a precise and total sanctimoniousness at play here. It's about time people starting calling on it, like they are starting to on automatic accusations of 'isms'.

We've just had an election with one of the best turnouts of recent years. The people did 'rise up'. The problem for some is that they rose up and rejected socialist profligacy and mediocrity.

We're never to be forgiven for that.
 
Well, in many cases the 'working' class don't so it's something of a misnomer. It used to mean low- and unskilled/manual workers - the stock I'm from. But it also includes the lower middle classes in my mind.

A good friend, a former Labour man, made a good point over a couple of beers on Saturday: it used to be that the ambition of people was to become a social class up from where they started. So, for example, getting off the shop floor and into management... getting your kids into college and being professionals - not having to graft or get dirty like you did.

That's gone. Labour has turned being ashamed of success into an art form. You have to feel guilty for doing well. You're supposed to accept that you deserve no more than the feckless and idle. If you are talented, you're to feel guilty for being blessed with earning potential.

There was an article in the Telegraph over the weekend which talked about how people are 'ashamed' to admit voting Tory. The Left has so hijacked the moral ground in the media that to be Conservative is to be everything evil... which is nonsense but it's where we are. There's a precise and total sanctimoniousness at play here. It's about time people starting calling on it, like they are starting to on automatic accusations of 'isms'.

We've just had an election with one of the best turnouts of recent years. The people did 'rise up'. The problem for some is that they rose up and rejected socialist profligacy and mediocrity.

We're never to be forgiven for that.

Quite.
I'm a tory, always have been, not ashamed. But I would not place blue election paraphnallia outside my house during the run up to an election. The reason is that I cant be bothered to have to deal with the mindless bullies who will see it as an opportunity to attack my home. If your not sure who I mean look at the red teams fans in Downing Street this weekend.
 
Well, in many cases the 'working' class don't so it's something of a misnomer. It used to mean low- and unskilled/manual workers - the stock I'm from. But it also includes the lower middle classes in my mind.

A good friend, a former Labour man, made a good point over a couple of beers on Saturday: it used to be that the ambition of people was to become a social class up from where they started. So, for example, getting off the shop floor and into management... getting your kids into college and being professionals - not having to graft or get dirty like you did.

That's gone. Labour has turned being ashamed of success into an art form. You have to feel guilty for doing well. You're supposed to accept that you deserve no more than the feckless and idle. If you are talented, you're to feel guilty for being blessed with earning potential.

There was an article in the Telegraph over the weekend which talked about how people are 'ashamed' to admit voting Tory. The Left has so hijacked the moral ground in the media that to be Conservative is to be everything evil... which is nonsense but it's where we are. There's a precise and total sanctimoniousness at play here. It's about time people starting calling on it, like they are starting to on automatic accusations of 'isms'.

We've just had an election with one of the best turnouts of recent years. The people did 'rise up'. The problem for some is that they rose up and rejected socialist profligacy and mediocrity.

We're never to be forgiven for that.

Spot on! The cornerstone of this agenda was the removal of the most effective method of social mobility in the UK - the grammar schools. Then imposing a one-size fits all, lowest common denomiinator (comprehensive) "education" system and moreover providing a state subsidy to the (failed) products of this system in order to make them dependant on the state and thus ensure more votes for socialism

My wife was fuming this morning about something she read on facebook. Someone in Lewes posted that if a Tory supporter came into his shop he should be charged 10% more. The "right-on" brigade can't stand it when someone rationally goes against their beliefs. Socialism is a creed and they believe all should follow the one true shining path of Marxist righteousness. What they cannot see is that they fulfil the moebius strip theory of extremism by becoming as totalitarian as fascists.
 
Spot on! The cornerstone of this agenda was the removal of the most effective method of social mobility in the UK - the grammar schools. Then imposing a one-size fits all, lowest common denomiinator (comprehensive) "education" system and moreover providing a state subsidy to the (failed) products of this system in order to make them dependant on the state and thus ensure more votes for socialism

My wife was fuming this morning about something she read on facebook. Someone in Lewes posted that if a Tory supporter came into his shop he should be charged 10% more. The "right-on" brigade can't stand it when someone rationally goes against their beliefs. Socialism is a creed and they believe all should follow the one true shining path of Marxist righteousness. What they cannot see is that they fulfil the moebius strip (as pertaining to the spectrum of political views) theory of political extremism by becoming just as totalitarian as fascists.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Spot on! The cornerstone of this agenda was the removal of the most effective method of social mobility in the UK - the grammar schools. Then imposing a one-size fits all, lowest common denomiinator (comprehensive) "education" system and moreover providing a state subsidy to the (failed) products of this system in order to make them dependant on the state and thus ensure more votes for socialism

My wife was fuming this morning about something she read on facebook. Someone in Lewes posted that if a Tory supporter came into his shop he should be charged 10% more. The "right-on" brigade can't stand it when someone rationally goes against their beliefs. Socialism is a creed and they believe all should follow the one true shining path of Marxist righteousness. What they cannot see is that they fulfil the moebius strip theory of extremism by becoming as totalitarian as fascists.

Yes, I saw that post, too.

The way they'd have it, there are barefoot people in rags scavenging the bins for the gravy-soaked crusts that the rich threw out.

But a further part of the conversation I had at the weekend is that Labour still believes in the money tree - there is no true concept among its support of where the funds will come from for all these 'social equality' schemes. It should just be there.

I pointed out on another poster's thread that fundamentally Labour wasn't trusted on the economy - and that without a working economy all else fails. See how much 'social equality' we'd have if this place became like Mogadishu - this twunt was saying that he'd rather see total system breakdown that what we have now.

I asked him think about that... electricity for a half hour a day, people stealing your possessions and food at gunpoint, no recourse to the police because the police are in on all the rackets. To state that total system collapse is better than what we have now only demonstrates what a safe society these loons exist in and rail against.

I'm not denying that there's hardship. Some of that hardship and dependency is of Labour's making, however. Some of it is because people have been used to that money tree being there. Brown poisoned the soil just as autumn arrived and yet somehow that's the Tories' fault. The levels of cognitive dissonance are frightening.
 
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