Kyrgyz revolution

#1
BBC Link.

After some bloody clashes between the security forces and demonstrators, it seems a new government is in town. Given that Otunbayeva is pro-Moscow, it looks like the Central Asian ball is increasingly in Moscow's court.

On the other hand, she was ambassador to both UK and US in her time, so perhaps we have a window of opportunity to increase our influence? Apart from a small reinforcement to the Russian base at Kant, the regional big-boys seem to be holding their own counsel.
 
#2
Surely the first question is why do we care ? Kyrgyzstan is a windswept hellhole kept afloat by fees from military bases. The best thing you could do for the place is bus 90 off percent of the locals somewhere else.

And as to the bases, the only reason the US are there is to support ops in AFG. And the only reason the Russians maintain more than a token presence is to extort concessions from the US by making them make concessions to keep the base working. As soon as the US leaves AFG the Russians will mostly leave and the whole place will fall apart, and no-one with any sense will care.
 
#4
...........and Scrabble. You can get lots of points with that one now.
 
#6
One_of_the_strange said:
As soon as the US leaves AFG the Russians will mostly leave and the whole place will fall apart, and no-one with any sense will care.
Not sure I agree on that one. Anyone with any sense and an eye to the long game will have an interest in what goes on in every Central Asian republic. Apart from the strategic East/West location, they've got vast amounts of untapped resources.

From the Asian Development Bank, p21 Section 2.1.1 shows the unexploited fresh water reserves and p26 Table 1.7 shows the number of confirmed and ready to go mineral deposits. There are also vast swathes of timber and at least the prospect of making arable land or pasture out of the plains.
 
#7
Shame, I thought this thread was about some sort of dyslexic uprising :(
 
#8
smartascarrots said:
One_of_the_strange said:
As soon as the US leaves AFG the Russians will mostly leave and the whole place will fall apart, and no-one with any sense will care.
Not sure I agree on that one. Anyone with any sense and an eye to the long game will have an interest in what goes on in every Central Asian republic. Apart from the strategic East/West location, they've got vast amounts of untapped resources.

From the Asian Development Bank, p21 Section 2.1.1 shows the unexploited fresh water reserves and p26 Table 1.7 shows the number of confirmed and ready to go mineral deposits. There are also vast swathes of timber and at least the prospect of making arable land or pasture out of the plains.


Yeah right..!!..another Aral Sea/cotton crop disaster..the usual greed driven logging decimation(a area of Russian expertise) and 'Oklahoma' dust bowls 'a la the 1930's'...the central aisiatics are a greed driven lot but what is worse very stupid..!!
 
#9
Ground nut investments, anyone?
 
#10
Need to get the UN to bomb the place with vowels first of course.
 
#11
eodmatt said:
Need to get the UN to bomb the place with vowels first of course.
That's probably why their equivalent of Countdown has never really been a success.
 
#13
johnboyzzz said:
mistersoft said:
eodmatt said:
Need to get the UN to bomb the place with vowels first of course.
That's probably why their equivalent of Countdown has never really been a success.
Vordorman walt :D
If we can get the UN to spark, I can prolly get the rights to sell Scrabble there, who's with me?
 
#14
Looks like the fat lady hasn't sung quite yet.

The old regime was comparatively friendly to the US presence, the new lot seem to be rather less warm.

Later another opposition leader, Omurbek Tekebayev, told Reuters that Russia had "played its role in ousting Bakiyev" and that there was a "high probability that the duration of the US air base's presence in Kyrgyzstan will be shortened".
 
#15
smartascarrots said:
BBC Link.

After some bloody clashes between the security forces and demonstrators, it seems a new government is in town. Given that Otunbayeva is pro-Moscow, it looks like the Central Asian ball is increasingly in Moscow's court.

On the other hand, she was ambassador to both UK and US in her time, so perhaps we have a window of opportunity to increase our influence? Apart from a small reinforcement to the Russian base at Kant, the regional big-boys seem to be holding their own counsel.
A counter-color revolution inspired by the Kremlin perhaps?
 
#16
smartascarrots said:
Looks like the fat lady hasn't sung quite yet.

The old regime was comparatively friendly to the US presence, the new lot seem to be rather less warm.

Later another opposition leader, Omurbek Tekebayev, told Reuters that Russia had "played its role in ousting Bakiyev" and that there was a "high probability that the duration of the US air base's presence in Kyrgyzstan will be shortened".
I can see it now:

Kremlin announces NATO has almost unlimited rights to transport logistics through Russian territory.

Bishkek announces the following day that it is refusing all and any support to NATO troops in Afghanistan.
 

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