Kosher Salt

philc

LE
Any here use it, is it it worth it for cooking. Lots of recipes for dry rubs for ribs recommend using kosher salt but its not available locally and not cheap either, so wondered if its worth the hassle.
 

TamH70

MIA
Any here use it, is it it worth it for cooking. Lots of recipes for dry rubs for ribs recommend using kosher salt but its not available locally and not cheap either, so wondered if its worth the hassle.
Kosher salt? Hmm. If you're not after the whole kashrut thing, you could try this:

https://www.tesco.com/groceries/en-GB/products/254193744

It's the same kind of stuff, but about a tenth of the price, as you'll find on Amazon. Which I just checked and nearly had a heart attack. Nine quid for salt?!? Jog on.

Recommended from here:

Where can I buy kosher salt in London?

Scroll down and you'll find a big piccy of said substance.
 
Salt of the earth is recommended, as is 100% organic hand raised artisan sourced outer Mongolian meteor crater sourced hipster salt, only £123- 25grams. FFS salt is salt, its tastes like.... F-in SALT.
No, seriously it somehow makes food taste slightly better. Normally I couldn't a flying-fk what goes in there.

p.s: prefer the red Martian salt flown back by NASA more
 
Any here use it, is it it worth it for cooking. Lots of recipes for dry rubs for ribs recommend using kosher salt but its not available locally and not cheap either, so wondered if its worth the hassle.
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I eliminated all added salt and choose items that have little/no/reduced salt content some time ago. My blood pressure thanks me for this on a daily basis.

I had no idea that kosher salt was even a thing until reading this, but it won't affect me!
 

Chef

LE
When I worked in Kosher abattoirs the salt used for Koshering was, as I recall, bags of granular salt similar to the stuff you put in dishwashers. It did the job, which is to draw out the blood, but if I was using it for cookery I'd go for coarse sea salt.
 
When I worked in Kosher abattoirs the salt used for Koshering was, as I recall, bags of granular salt similar to the stuff you put in dishwashers. It did the job, which is to draw out the blood, but if I was using it for cookery I'd go for coarse sea salt.
Were the animals stunned (and I don't mean surprised) before slaughter?
 
The kind of salt used for koshering meat (drawing out any traces of blood) is coarse salt. I've no idea how it could cost more than table salt since it requires less processing. During winter freezes/snow we used to scatter it on the garden path to help prevent slipping. In Israel it's very cheap and so it should be in the UK, unless they're mining it on Mars or summat.1 pound currently equals 4.51 Shekels - Note the supermarket's own brand is being sold here at the equivalent of 40 pence a kilo.
coarse salt.png
 
Salt of the earth is recommended, as is 100% organic hand raised artisan sourced outer Mongolian meteor crater sourced hipster salt, only £123- 25grams. FFS salt is salt, its tastes like.... F-in SALT.

I always thought salt is salt. Yonks ago some hipster friends from Blighty brought me Malden sea salt and I thought it was merely a Waitrose-types phenomenon. When they started with pink Himalaya salt I thought it was utter bs marketing hype, until friends gave me a jar. As far as for cooking is concerned I find it definitely better than regular salt,
 
pink Himalaya salt

Interesting. The Himalaya. A rang of tall mountains, in land, high fresh water lakes, Ditto rivers, no disenable sea water, no tidal waters, in fact no salt water of any description.... Its mined in Pakistan, part of which is in the foothills of the Himalaya, I suppose calling it "Pakistani salt" doesn't have the same ring or kudos to it, and god forbid the hipsters and food snobs should ever find out,.......... catastrophe!
 
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Interesting. The Himalaya. A rang of tall mountains, in land, high fresh water lakes, Ditto rivers, no disenable sea water, no tidal waters, in fact no salt water of any description.... Its mined in Pakistan, I suppose calling it "Pakistani salt" doesn't have the same ring or kudos to it, and god forbid the hipsters and food snobs should ever find out,.......... catastrophe!
Pakistani salt doesn't quite have same marketing ring to it...given the connotations..
 

Trans-sane

LE
Book Reviewer
Interesting. The Himalaya. A rang of tall mountains, in land, high fresh water lakes, Ditto rivers, no disenable sea water, no tidal waters, in fact no salt water of any description.... Its mined in Pakistan, I suppose calling it "Pakistani salt" doesn't have the same ring or kudos to it, and god forbid the hipsters and food snobs should ever find out,.......... catastrophe!
It was deposited during the Himalayan uplift. Trapped Indian Ocean sea water evaporated and left the salt behind. Similar to the Cheshire salt beds.
 
It was deposited during the Himalayan uplift. Trapped Indian Ocean sea water evaporated and left the salt behind. Similar to the Cheshire salt beds.
From my basic googling it seems to have come from the Punjab region which is shared by India and Pakistan..which got separated after you fellas left the Raj..
 
My particular sky pixie of choice has no strong views on sodium chloride. He would however strongly urge me to make serious money out those who do...
 

Chef

LE
Were the animals stunned (and I don't mean surprised) before slaughter?
No, the rules of Kashrut allow no latitude in this.*

However Halal meat can be stunned, which led to a bit of a schism in the Moslem community.

*The Shoctim undergo a shedload of training to qualify and be licensed. They are inspected quite often, fail the inspection and the license is withdrawn immediately.

The only requirement for Halal slaughter is the cutter be a Moslem. Standards there varied, some were good, others less so, although this may have changed.
 

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