Killing someone without getting into trouble?

#1
I'm evaluating the reasons for and against assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia. (Tony nicklinson, Diane Pretty, Dignitas clinic) One of the main reasons commentators state is that it could be the beginning of a 'slippery slope' ya'll know what that is referring to I'm sure. So given the events of WW2/the boer war and pretty much man kinds history of in humane treatment of all living things it is evident that we're capable of some serious sinister sh*t. So I would be much obliged to know your thoughts on the 'slippery slope'
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#4
I'm evaluating the reasons for and against assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia. (Tony nicklinson, Diane Pretty, Dignitas clinic) One of the main reasons commentators state is that it could be the beginning of a 'slippery slope' ya'll know what that is referring to I'm sure. So given the events of WW2/the boer war and pretty much man kinds history of in humane treatment of all living things it is evident that we're capable of some serious sinister sh*t. So I would be much obliged to know your thoughts on the 'slippery slope'
Crio it's been done before, how is Darren?
 
#5
From a legal point of view - how would you legislate for it? And how would the Courts handle disputes?

Would those doing the 'assisting' have to prove beyond reasonable doubt that the individual in question was of sound mind and wanted suicide and hadn't changed their mind?

Just like for the death penalty, I'm not in favour of this since 'certainty' is a very nebulous concept in law and I would be very reluctant to legalise executions or suicides were certainty not obtainable.
 
#6
If it means that I can drive everyone who has ever phoned Claims Direct, their spouses and offspring into an industrial mincer at bayonet point it cannot be steep or slippery enough.

Seriously. A pogrom would be a good thing. "Lowest" ten million over a period sufficient to prevent the price of organs crashing while they are converted into something useful to humanity.
 
#7
I'm evaluating the reasons for and against assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia. (Tony nicklinson, Diane Pretty, Dignitas clinic) One of the main reasons commentators state is that it could be the beginning of a 'slippery slope' ya'll know what that is referring to I'm sure. So given the events of WW2/the boer war and pretty much man kinds history of in humane treatment of all living things it is evident that we're capable of some serious sinister sh*t. So I would be much obliged to know your thoughts on the 'slippery slope'

The "slippery slope" is the use of slang and bad punctuation. This can lead to swearing and eventually child molestation.
 
#13
From a legal point of view - how would you legislate for it? And how would the Courts handle disputes?

Would those doing the 'assisting' have to prove beyond reasonable doubt that the individual in question was of sound mind and wanted suicide and hadn't changed their mind?

Just like for the death penalty, I'm not in favour of this since 'certainty' is a very nebulous concept in law and I would be very reluctant to legalise executions or suicides were certainty not obtainable.
The government refuses to legislate for it (just now) but i am sure that there would be safeguards but not 100% reliable like many other aspects of the law. Physician assisted suicide is already happening between those who have close long-term relationships with their doctors. And it is a compassionate act to end suffering. Anyhoo some proposed safeguards :- must be terminally ill with six months or less to live & Be mentally competent &
Make persistent, well-informed, voluntary requests &
Be suffering unbearably. Obviously this would not cover tony nicklinsons predicament should he still be alive. Campaigners are clearly trying to legalise it one little step at a time.
 
#14
well we put animals down and there's not much of a slippery slope there.
The law does not consider the life of an animal to be intrinsically valuable. The law believes human life is precious simply because of what it is - a human life. Must be preserved in its perpetuity etc
 
#16
Well Nefaria the Catholics are against euthanasia.

When one of their apprentice saints was ill this is what happened. His name was Leonard Cheshire. His aide seems to have been a former nun and aide to a Bishop (Cunnane I think) in Ireland. His aide asked for him to be invited to the 1993 Dambusters memorial service and indicated he would still need no special medical arrangements to attend.

His wife Sue Ryder, however, approached press and asked for obituaries to be prepared.

An East Anglian Daily Times journo called Phil Wisdom was told to drop inquiries into poor care standards and deaths at the Leonard Cheshire home and instead to prepare obituary.

He phoned staff and medical advisors at Cavendish and was told that Ryder was being 4 years premature.

Cheshire died 3 months later and Phil Wisdom is now a Home Office civil servant subject to OSA.

Catholic position then Don't do as I do do as I say ????
 
#18
Well Nefaria the Catholics are against euthanasia.

When one of their apprentice saints was ill this is what happened. His name was Leonard Cheshire. His aide seems to have been a former nun and aide to a Bishop (Cunnane I think) in Ireland. His aide asked for him to be invited to the 1993 Dambusters memorial service and indicated he would still need no special medical arrangements to attend.

His wife Sue Ryder, however, approached press and asked for obituaries to be prepared.

An East Anglian Daily Times journo called Phil Wisdom was told to drop inquiries into poor care standards and deaths at the Leonard Cheshire home and instead to prepare obituary.

He phoned staff and medical advisors at Cavendish and was told that Ryder was being 4 years premature.

Cheshire died 3 months later and Phil Wisdom is now a Home Office civil servant subject to OSA.

Catholic position then Don't do as I do do as I say ????
Were the Kent police involved in this conspiracy?
 
#19
Firstly, lets clarify something. We are only talking about assisted suicide here where a person has no capability of independent thought or action.

There has been suggestions that people should be able to leave what has been termed a "living will". That is, while a person has their wits and abilities about them they prepare a "will" as to their wishes should they become totally incapable. Using as an example the poor fellow who applied to the High Court for the right to an assisted suicide. He was still capable of communication so if he had been able to make a living will and then didn't want to die he was still capable of letting someone know.

I am not impressed by the "slippery slope" argument. Basically it is a fear based argument that has its counterpart in the legal profession know as the "floodgates" argument. That is if we let this happen once it will open up claims for masses of similar claims and there will never be an end to it all. The argument is mostly bovine excreta and there has been very little evidence as to its credibility and I would say the same for the arguments against assisted suicide. If it were to be legalised then I very much doubt it will lead to people being killed by avaricious offspring eager for their parents riches.
 

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