Kidney Stones,

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by Cpt_Subtext, Jan 18, 2007.

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  1. Hello guys.... a few months ago I was rushed into hospital, doped up on morphine, brilliant stuff, and then diagnosed with a small kidney stone.... only 5mm but hurt like a son of a cnut! Anyway was just reading through the notes along with my application form and it says about certain medical conditions leaving you unfit to serve and kidney stones is listed, however it says "Permanently unfit to serve, unless quantified" Does this mean that if im lucky to just have the one I shouldnt have trouble getting in or is it game over for my dream of joining the army?
     

  2. unless quantified - full medical report from hospital consultant including Ultrasoound findings, attached to Medical questionarre completed by GP

    that should be sufficient. Your application may be referred to the Service Specialist for Urology
     
  3. Fcuk me, 5mm! Surely that is quite large when it comes to kidney stones?

    Must have been like p1ssing a brick.....
     
  4. Thanks guys, actually devilish according to the consultant it was miniscule and I didnt feel it when I peed the bugger out, just remember hearing a plonk and lookin down and seein it sink, was I fcuk fishing it out! heheh All I can say mate is pray you never get one!!!!!
     
  5. how do you get them and how do you prevent it ?
     
  6. It might be a load of sh!te but I heard you got them from hard water, but that was from someone trieing to justify spending £30 on a water filter
     
  7. I discovered in my late 30s that I'm prone to them - some people are, some aren't. Prevention is as simple as staying properly hydrated, in most cases (drink fluids until your urine is clear) which is why I never found out until recently.

    <apologies for any cr*p biology, quacks please feel free to correct me>
    It's chemicals precipitating out of your urine to form deposits, inside your kidneys; they normally flush away with the urine produced by the kidneys, but they form faster when the amount of chemicals in the liquid in your kidneys goes up - i.e. when you're dehydrated, and your kidneys are chucking out less urine to flush them away.

    Anyway, I've been reasonably dehydrated for a day or two twice in the past decade; once after a long plane journey back from India, the other after a bad dose of flu.

    Both times, the kidney stones stuck in the left ureter. Yeeehaaa. First time, it took a night of pain to pass, the second time it took a few days. Because the ureter (tubes from kidneys to bladder) are narrower than the urethra (tube from bladder to outside world), once it's in the bladder you're probably home free. You hope.

    I also found that if I dehydrate slightly for a short while, I get occasional flashes of pain as I feel a small stone travelling down :( :(.

    PS I live in a soft water area - no hard water involved.
     
  8. Right gentlemen. You have just walked up my street and asked for directions. In fact, my MD thesis covers some of this.

    This thread asks several questions, supposes several incorrect things, and makes a few categorical errors. Other statements are correct.

    It's late, but I'll start answering these, and if other questions arrive I'll check again tomorrow.

    In reverse order:

    "I discovered in my late 30s that I'm prone to them - some people are, some aren't."

    This is essentially true. Some people are prone to stones, some will make them no matter what is done, some will only make them if conditions are right. Others will almost never be able to make a stone, given a "normal" lifestyle. It's largely down to genetics, affected by behaviour.

    "Prevention is as simple as staying properly hydrated, in most cases (drink fluids until your urine is clear)"

    Hydration is undoubtably the most important factor. That said, some people will concentrate components of urine such that, no matter how mcuh they drink, they will always form stones. For most people and most stones, however, there are three general rules of advice: 1. Maintain hydration - at least 2L a day, keeping the urine no more than mid-yellow. 2. Reduce salt intake - sodium chloride assists in the precipitation of all stone types. 3. Reduce weight - can't tell you why (can't remember) but people who lose excess weight make fewer stones.

    Don't listen to old wives tales, like cutting out dairy products. That, for example, can help (if you have a calcium stone) but can make things worse (e.g., if you have an oxalate stone). These dietary measures can only be safely advised after blood and urine tests, and sometimes stone analysis.

    I have never heard this hard water theory before. I suspect it is bollocks. And, being a urologist, I know bollocks.

    "Fcuk me, 5mm! Surely that is quite large when it comes to kidney stones? "

    Uh, no. More than 5mm and one starts to worry that it won't pass. More than 95% of stones 5mm or less at the end of the ureter will pass. This drops sharply at 6mm, but we would only consider a stone "large" at more than 10mm.

    Because the ureter is slightly funnel-shaped, the smaller the stone, the lower down the "pipe" it will fall before wedging. Thus, there is a larger muscle mass behind a small stone, trying to push it through. Therefore, ironically, a small stone is often more painful than a large one which never makes it very far down the drainpipe.

    "Must have been like p1ssing a brick....."

    Yes. I believe so.

    "Does this mean that if im lucky to just have the one I shouldnt have trouble getting in or is it game over for my dream of joining the army?"

    I'm not qualified to speak about army selection. Having passed the only stone you possess is undoubtedly a good thing. Statistics say though that anyone who has their first, single stone has a 50% chance of another in the next 8 years. Mind, 50% don't as well, and some never have another.

    Keep drinking that water.

    BW,

    FF.

    P.S. Fire questions at will. I will try to answer. Stones are not my specialty (although ureteric function is), but I am probably able to find out answers to those questions I am unsure of.
     
  9. which one is will? :)
     
  10. Thanks friendly, I spent 2 days in hospital and although it could have been the massive amounts of pain killers I was on you have just told me more about stones in your reply than any of the doctors at the hospital did! So thankyou....

    And like I said I didnt feel it when I passed just heard the splash..... lucky boy I was.... the most annoying period was where it was in the bladder and every so often id feel a pinch....