Kentucky Legends

From the Battle of New Orleans

“We marched,” said this officer, “in solid column in a direct line, upon the American defenses. I belonging to the staff; and as we advanced, we watched through our glasses, the position of the enemy, with that intensity an officer only feels when marching into the jaws of death. It was a strange sight, that breastwork, with the crowds of beings behind, their heads only visible above the line of defense. We could distinctly see the long rifles lying on the works, and the batteries in our front with their great mouths gaping towards us. We could see the position of General Jackson, with his staff around him. But what attracted our attention most was the figure of a tall man standing on the breastworks dressed in linsey-woolsey, with buckskin leggins and a broad-brimmed hat that fell around his face almost concealing his features. He was standing in one of those picturesque graceful attitudes peculiar to those natural men dwelling in forests. The body rested on the left leg and swayed with a curved line upward. The right arm was extended, the hand grasping the rifle near the muzzle, the butt of which rested near the toe of his right foot. With his left hand he raised the rim of his hat from his eyes and seemed gazing intently on our advancing column. The cannon of the enemy had opened up on us and tore through our ranks with dreadful slaughter; but we continued to advance unwavering and cool, as if nothing threatened our program.

‘The roar of the cannon had no effect upon the figure before us; he seemed fixed and motionless as a statute. At last he moved, threw back his hat rim over the crown with his left hand, raised his rifle and took aim at our group. At whom had he leveled his piece? But the distance was so great that we looked at each other and smiled. We saw the rifle flash and very rightly conjectured that his aim was in the direction of our party. My right hand companion, as noble a fellow as ever rode at the head of a regiment, fell from his saddle. The hunter paused a few moments without moving the gun from his shoulder. Then he reloaded and resumed his former attitude. Throwing the hat rim over his eyes and again holding it up with the left hand, he fixed his piercing gaze upon us, as if hunting out another victim. Once more, the hat rim was thrown back, and the gun raised to his shoulder. This time we did not smile, but cast our glances at each other, to see which of us must die. When again the rifle flashed another of our party dropped to the earth. There was something most awful in this marching to certain death. The cannon and thousands of musket balls played upon our ranks, we cared not for; for there was a chance of escaping them. Most of us had walked as coolly upon batteries more destructive, without quailing, but to know that every time that rifle was leveled toward us, and its bullet sprang from the barrel, one of us must surely fall; to see it rest, motionless as if poised on a rack, and know, when the hammer came down, that the messenger of death drove unerringly to its goal, to know this, and still march on, was awful.

‘I could see nothing but the tall figure standing on the breastworks; he seemed to grow, phantom-like, higher and higher, assuming through the smoke the supernatural appearance of some great spirit of death. Again did he reload and discharge and reload and discharge his rifle with the same unfailing aim, and the same unfailing result; and it was with indescribable pleasure that I beheld, as we marched [towards] the American lines, the sulphorous clouds gathering around us, and shutting that spectral hunter from our gaze.

‘We lost the battle, and to my mind, that Kentucky Rifleman contributed more to our defeat than anything else; for which he remained to our sight, our attention was drawn from our duties. And when at last, we became enshrouded in the smoke, the work was completed, we were in utter confusion and unable, in the extremity, to restore order sufficient to make any successful attack. The battle was lost.”
 

37ucv67i

War Hero
Sounds like politically motivated bullshit to me.

MYTH #5: Kentucky riflemen were responsible for the American victory.
Days before the main battle on January 8, upwards of 2,000 untrained Kentucky militiamen arrived in New Orleans, ready to defend the city. Most of the poorly equipped riflemen, however, lacked an important accessory—a rifle. Fighting with makeshift weapons, the Kentucky volunteers had little impact on the fight and even infuriated Jackson by taking flight in the midst of battle. “The Kentucky reinforcements, in whom so much reliance had been placed, ingloriously fled,” the general wrote the day after the battle, “thus yielding to the enemy that most formidable position.” Although cannon and artillery fire from the army regulars ultimately inflicted the most damage on the British forces, a popular 1821 song penned by Samuel Woodworth, “The Hunters of Kentucky,” rewrote history by exaggerating the role of the backcountry marksmen. Even though the tune lionized the fighting men Jackson once cursed, its popularity among his political supporters on the frontier persuaded “Old Hickory” to adopt it as his campaign song on his way to winning the White House in 1828.
 
Yes, It would be just like a British Staff officer to exaggerate.

Jackson did in fact blame delays in the victory on some of the Kentucky militia, and there was even an official military court of inquiry that cleared the Kentuckians, and placed blame on Jackson's planning, where it obviously belongs. There seemed to be a trend with "untrained" Kentucky Foot Militia getting the blame for losses under the command of Federal Officers that had no experience of woodsmen type operations.

Just like most officers of any time to attempt to shift responsibility when their plan falls apart.

Also, I was going to mention that song later...

And that one page you found that rewrites the rewrites of the rewrites to be all myth-buster-blustery.

Did you know there is another that is even better? Some fella wrote a thesis for his MFA (History) last year, at the University of Louisville in the same vein. His lack of military knowledge, grammar, spelling, and coherence of thought for more than half a paragraph was apparently not an impediment. With his right-on revisions, and much injection of his own opinion as to the motivations of those long dead, it only took him 4 years to finish his MFA (if he did). You should read it. It is very entertaining.
 
You mean there are more - Other than Col Sanders and his merry chickens :D :D
Shurely you mean merry Col Sanders and his dead chickens?
They're the best kind, the evil, beady eyed, tasty little morsels.
Harland Sanders happens to have been my second cousin. However, he was originally from Indiana, as was my paternal Grandmother. If anyone wants the real original family recipe, from before he added MSG to it and stuck it in a pressure cooker, forget it, I will be using it if I ever decide to open my own chicken chain.
 
Americans use "legend" far too liberally
I had hoped for a bit more from the cheap seats... The word was chosen specifically to give someone the opportunity for yet another tired old "Leg-End" pun.

The word hero gets an awful lot of use too.
How often have you seen me use either word?
 
I had hoped for a bit more from the cheap seats... The word was chosen specifically to give someone the opportunity for yet another tired old "Leg-End" pun.
I had a Polish (Polish as in a national of Poland and NOT polish as in Kiwi parade gloss black boot polish) lecturer at university who used to say "Leg - end" when referring to the legend on maps. He was not taking the piss, he spoke english with a heavy polish accent and it was just how he pronounced it

How often have you seen me use either word?
You, never, as far as can recall.

[cynic mode] It just grips my shit when every time a news reporter in the US refers to a good thing a US cop or fireman has done they insist on refering to them as a "hero". Doesn't matter if they helped an old lady across the road, or dived into a burning building to rescue a cat. Hero has become a word that too easily trips off a newscasters tongue here - most of them are simply doing the job they are paid to do, and plenty of them are doing that job for the pension and medical benefits and the fact that they were too dim to do anything at college to get a different job. [/cynic mode]
 
I had a Polish (Polish as in a national of Poland and NOT polish as in Kiwi parade gloss black boot polish) lecturer at university who used to say "Leg - end" when referring to the legend on maps. He was not taking the piss, he spoke english with a heavy polish accent and it was just how he pronounced it



You, never, as far as can recall.

[cynic mode] It just grips my shit when every time a news reporter in the US refers to a good thing a US cop or fireman has done they insist on refering to them as a "hero". Doesn't matter if they helped an old lady across the road, or dived into a burning building to rescue a cat. Hero has become a word that too easily trips off a newscasters tongue here - most of them are simply doing the job they are paid to do, and plenty of them are doing that job for the pension and medical benefits and the fact that they were too dim to do anything at college to get a different job. [/cynic mode]
I am not a big fan of the overuse of the word hero myself, however, it bothers me only a slight bit less than newsreaders pushing "pleaded" into general use because they aren't aware enough of their own supposed story that they can't get the pronunciation of "plead" correct in the context of their presentation.

Thank you for reminding me I left off the sarcasm tags when replying to Endoscope...

The proper definition of Legend is a bit less heroic than it is generally perceived, likely due to former usage.

Let's go with Britannica, shall we?

Legend, traditional story or group of stories told about a particular person or place. Formerly the term legend meant a tale about a saint. Legends resemble folktales in content; they may include supernatural beings, elements of mythology, or explanations of natural phenomena, but they are associated with a particular locality or person and are told as a matter of history.
 
Aren't Legends from McDonald's?

Anyway, I think you really needed to contribute a few of your own thoughts in the first post OP rather than rely solely on the words of a Colonial Oppressor. However, all is not lost just imagine a few random arrsers as looking like Yosemite Sam and that should allow you to channel your righteous revolutionary rage into a full on Bugs Bunny outburst.
Weren't they all killed in Glencoe by those sneaky Campbell's? :scratch:
 
Aren't Legends from McDonalds?

Anyway, I think you really needed to contribute a few of your own thoughts in the first post OP rather than rely solely on the words of a Colonial Oppressor. However, all is not lost just imagine a few random arrsers as looking like Yosemite Sam and that should allow you to channel your righteous revolutionary rage into a full on Bugs Bunny outburst.
I am quite sure that I do not follow your line of inquiry with respect to McDonalds.

This post only originated as a tangential continuation of discussion started in the "Newly moderated area of the site" post in the Police, PMCs, Security sub forum which @Arte_et_Marte closed. Thank you for pointing out that I should probably tag @Nato123 so that he doesn't miss the homoerotic descriptions therein, such as "But what attracted our attention most was the figure of a tall man standing on the breastworks dressed in linsey-woolsey, with buckskin leggins and a broad-brimmed hat that fell around his face almost concealing his features. He was standing in one of those picturesque graceful attitudes peculiar to those natural men dwelling in forests. The body rested on the left leg and swayed with a curved line upward. The right arm was extended, the hand grasping the rifle near the muzzle, the butt of which rested near the toe of his right foot. With his left hand he raised the rim of his hat from his eyes and seemed gazing intently on our advancing column." I should probably also tag @TamH70 to let them know that their question about my ownership of Redcoat killin' Kentucky long rifles has been acknowledged, and now answered in the affirmative. I have quite a few.

Bugs Bunny was rather a calm fellow, much like myself. It always ever seemed the outrage was someone else's part.

Thank you for your attempt at participation, it is appreciated... by someone... I am certain.
 
Weren't they all killed in Glencoe by those sneaky Campbell's? :scratch:
We are planning to explore the various ascribed roots of red neck and hill billy eventually...
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
DavidBOC Miscellaneous Jokes 3
Excognito The NAAFI Bar 51
Dirtyfilthymech The NAAFI Bar 33

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top