Keeping your rank in civvie street....

#1
Hi all,
I went to a do the other day, where the vast majority where ex officers from all three services.
Most of them refered to themselves on their name badges, and introductions by their retired ranks... ie Colonel etc.
I found it very irritating , and frankly, quite sad. They seemed to have become what they used to be!!
I was not an officer..... so..... Am I being narrow minded, or ungracious?

Regards,
John. :?
 
#2
When I get out I might start getting people to refer to me as corporal. Maybe it would start a trend, would be even funnier because no one even calls me that at work at the moment!!!
 
#4
Its great when you have to phone them and they answer with their rank they always seem to forget to tell you that they are actully retired and no more authority than any other civvie.
 
#5
I think senior officers are allowed to retain the honoric rank title. That is Sqn Ldr, Maj or Lt Cdr (Retd) and above. The higher up you go the more interested people seem to be in keeping their rank, but thats probably because General X is employed as a director of xxx arms company because he was a General and needs to keep up appearences

That said I was at a dinner where the star guest was an ex 2 star who insisted he was called General as if he was in the Mess. He lost total cred and we all took great delight in addressing each other as Mr Y, Z etc if within earshot - it was simply inappropriate for the event.

That said you may all now address me as Leading Arrsespanker Crab (LAC for the pongoes)

RC
 
#6
Retd_crab said:
I think senior officers are allowed to retain the honoric rank title.
Is this true Leading Arrsespanker Crab or is it another myth from military history?
Why would anyone want to be known by their ex-rank (I understand officers who sit on a board of directors)
Are officers who resign in disgrace allowed to be known by their rank?
It seems a bit waltish.
 
#7
Strongbow said:
Hi all,
I went to a do the other day, where the vast majority where ex officers from all three services.
Most of them refered to themselves on their name badges, and introductions by their retired ranks... ie Colonel etc.
I found it very irritating , and frankly, quite sad. They seemed to have become what they used to be!!
I was not an officer..... so..... Am I being narrow minded, or ungracious?

Regards,
John. :?
Had cause to ring the Garrison SSO's the other day and spoke to the the big man himself, Col retired of course. Anyway I set about asking for advice on a subject when he very rudely put the phone down. What a cnut, had to pop in to the SSO's the day after and got collard by a WO in his dept who very kindly reminded me that he was a Retired Col you know. Cheers for that Cnut.
 
#8
Yes - to both. End.

and no I don't do it myself.
 
#9
There is some sort of protocol on this. I don't know what it is but I recall thet Capt Mark Phillips cause some comment when he 'retained' his rank on leaving the army. I always thought Colonel was the lowest in the army and Captain in the RN.
 
#10
Go on. Someone make me feel old by asking who Mark Phillpis is.
 
#11
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Phillips

Upon passing out from Sandhurst, Phillips was commissioned into 1st The Queen's Dragoon Guards in 1969, where he acquired the nickname "Foggy" on the grounds that he was "thick and wet". Since leaving the Army he has continued to style himself Captain Mark Phillips

msr
 
#14
Field rank and above.

Any below are (even) sadder twats for retaining the post noms.

Let go ffs. Everyone just thinks you can't get along on your personality in civvy street*.





*Most cant which is why they stay in and around the military.

Bunch of dribbling cnuts.

Across the road from us is like a Saga holiday camp not an HQ. Maybe thats why the Corps will disappear within 10 years?
 
#15
Says you.......

Even in your Civies your Gola tracksuit has Cpl Flash written on it
 
#17
In the late 1980s in a large UK Garrison town there was situated a firm of solicitors who's senior partner was a retired ALS Colonel. Needless to say, he was frequently used by defendants at DCM.

He would subvert established procedure by ringing up the most junior orderly room staff using his former rank in the present tense to exert an authority he no longer possessed to demand material to which he would not, in the normal course of things be entitled to demand. He would, for example, demand the original RMP reports instead of the abstracts of evidence served on the accused. The more junior the staff to whom these demands were made, the more malleable and easily intimidated they were and the more likely they were to pass to him that to which he had no right to demand.

He would 'summon' prosecution witnesses to his office by the same means. One of whom was a Warrant Officer! He would have them stand to attention in his office and have them call him 'sir' and sign statements!

On no occasion would he make a request through the unit Adjutant or Chief Clerk who would be able to remind him in no uncertain terms of the limits of his authority (or lack of!) and he managed to get away with it for quite some time.

A classic example of the abuse of honourary rank on retirement!

He was very effective as a defence counsel!

I think he is still practising!
 
#18
MDN what about the sequinned chevrons on your gimp suit?
 
#19
I was under the impression that when ruperts retired or PVR'd they where "made up" a rank but got pensioned at there normal rank. IE. all Majors are Captains, Lt. Colonels..(called Colonel anyway) were Majors.

They've earn't it, touch sad but no biggy in my book.
 
#20
Electric_Dobbin said:
Isn't it just a tradition that they have grabbed on to??
Nope, Annex C to Chapter 9 of QRs refers:

Retention of substantive rank

a. A regular officer who is eligible by length of service for retired pay or gratuity, or who retires on account of ill health having been reported by the approved medical authority as being unfit for military service, will retain his substantive rank on retirement.

b. A short service officer who qualifies for the full rate of retired pay applicable to a regular officer will similarly retain his substantive rank on retirement.

c. A retired officer will forfeit his rank and status after conviction by a civil power where said conviction results in a custodial sentence.
 

Latest Threads

Top