Keeping socks (and so feet) dry?

#1
Skin's waterproof, except the skin on my feet isn't.

Feet dry. Rain. Trouser leg gets wet. Sock absorbs wet. Boot absorbs wet. Feet absorb wet. Feet suffer.

Sounds like a retarded question, but is there any way to break the cycle if you can't break the rain without gtx socks or trousers? (which are for gays, apparently)
 
#5
Gaiters are good kit, they form a loose seal at the top of a boot. But whatever solution you come up with, will just be one more on the endless list of solutions for one of solderings oldest problems (footcare)
Good admin and foot powder is always a good start, No matter how well you waterproof the outside of a boot there is always a big hole at the top. Even if your feet don't get wet from external water there is is still sweat to be sorted. So sock rotation footpowder admin.
Oh and air them put a pair of flip flops in your pack for down time.
 
D

Davetheclown

Guest
#6
Skin's waterproof, except the skin on my feet isn't.

Feet dry. Rain. Trouser leg gets wet. Sock absorbs wet. Boot absorbs wet. Feet absorb wet. Feet suffer.

Sounds like a retarded question, but is there any way to break the cycle if you can't break the rain without gtx socks or trousers? (which are for gays, apparently)

dont wear socks break the cycle. Or go and see the Padre and he will give you the secret of walking on water!
 
#9
Not being funny, but I've never had water ingress from the top of my boots, via the socks, less for submerging my lower leg in water deeper than the boots.

Once upon a time, on AACC, they told us not to fold your sock over the top of your boot (a common practice apparently) as capillary action will cause the water to travel down your leg.

Now I never did roll my socks, but others on the course used to and they commented on how it seemed to make a difference.

Other than that, ensuring boots are as waterproof as possible and practicing good wet and dry drills if you suspect your feet are going to be swamped. Gaiters are great for thrashing around in long grass etc, where your lower legs might get drenched, the berghaus ones (I'm sure others are available) that used to fit over the boot with a rubber seal around the sole were great.
 
#14
The army issue you a perfectly good set of GTX gaiters.

Everyone says you look gay, until you are the only one with dry feet in the rain soaked harbour.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
#15
#16
Puttees did work - and so did those strips of cloth that we used to wrap around our ankles.

Water is going to get into your boots. Unless you wear waterproof trousers and a waterproof jacket with the hood up. Then it'll be sweat that works its way into your boots.

If you accept that it's going to be wet inside your boots, the next option is to prevent your feet being affected by it. Sudocreme prevents nappy rash by keeping wee off baby's bum. It'll do the same for keeping water off your feet.

Just remember to dry your feet and apply a good smothering every time you cry.



added:

That'll fly in the face of those who say to use foot powder - obviously you can't use Sudocreme and foot powder together. I'm not one of the foot powder brigade, having found that it takes the skin off my feet.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#17
Apart from the puttees you are not far wrong, the WW1 boys who used this footware use dubbin by the gallon on their boots, and massaged 'whale oil' into their feet. It was later in the war, but worked to a good extent, except of course when they were up to their waists in water and mud.
Dubbin is ace but don't use on any boots you may want to polish.
 
#19
Although dubbin keeps water from seeping through the leather and stitching, it's not a lot of cop when the rain has soaked through your trousers and is running down your legs - unless you want a bootful of water. The puttees absorbed that water at the top of the boot and could be wrung out again, ready for another load.
 

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