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Karrimor Hot Rock.

My Merrells don't come with Vibram soles - they're fitted with Merrell Select-Grip ones instead. By which I take it that they select what surfaces they want to grip onto and screw you if you disagree with them. I had a really expensive pair of Asolo boots decades ago and they had the same problem.

Only I didn't find out how crap they were until I was halfway along the Lairig Ghru track in the Cairngorms, walked on a wet patch of rock and things escalated from there.

My Magnums have slip-resistant and oil-resistant soles on them, and they're not kidding - but they don't have Vibram branding on them either.

Sometimes running shoes designed for mountain running can be handy, it's what I've used up Snowdon in the winter sometimes when mountain boots were fine on the snow, but not so good on the ice

It's all personal preference though
 
'A Karrimor hot rock' sounds like the sort of phrase that you look up on the internet, and then really wish you hadn't...
 

Dennis48

War Hero
Ideal for hiking in warmer climes and the added benefit you wont fall over when pissed.

 
I've been using Hot Rock boots for quite a bit now. I get about 18 months/ 2 years out of a pair.
They do what they say on the box, but can be a bugger to break in due to the stiff rubber toe surround which causes some discomfort until it stretches.
They also have this weird 'flap' on the inside at the back which I presume is to support your achilles tendon, but when you put your boots on it folds down, resulting in either trying to put your boot on again, or awkwardly fishing it back up into position from the back of your leg.
The soles wear out before the anything else does and I use them for not particulalry challenging routes in the Lakes and Pennines.
I also still have a pair of old custom fitted Altberg boots (back when they were still a small outfit making boots in Richmond) which I didn't get on with at all and they were way too narrow and resoloutly refused to get comfy.
I may get around to eBay-ing them at some point
I would splash out on a 'better' brand, but suspect that I would wear those out at thesame rate, so don't really fancy paying over twice as much so regularly.
 

NSP

LE
A minor point, boys and gals, but I always factor in my foot underwear when choosing a boot. I usually go for one that comes in half-sizes so I can go a half-size up from what fits my cold, thin-socked foot comfortably in the shop ('cos sadly not all size tens are the same size, depending on brand - for example, my Karrimor hikers are 10.5. My Hi-Tecs that preceded them were 10. Both fit identically).

This is because I wear a thin cotton-rich sock on the foot and then the thick hiking sock, then the boot. Thus, there is space in the boot for the sock load and for your feet to swell when they are all sweaty, hot and beasted about.

The purpose of two socks is a) cotton against the skin but with the insulation and cushioning benefits of the thicker sock and b) the boot rubs the thick sock over the thin one, not over the skin - i.e. no blisters, especially in that soft, mobile, wrinkly skin on the back of the ankle between the heal and the joint.
 
A minor point, boys and gals, but I always factor in my foot underwear when choosing a boot. I usually go for one that comes in half-sizes so I can go a half-size up from what fits my cold, thin-socked foot comfortably in the shop ('cos sadly not all size tens are the same size, depending on brand - for example, my Karrimor hikers are 10.5. My Hi-Tecs that preceded them were 10. Both fit identically).

This is because I wear a thin cotton-rich sock on the foot and then the thick hiking sock, then the boot. Thus, there is space in the boot for the sock load and for your feet to swell when they are all sweaty, hot and beasted about.

The purpose of two socks is a) cotton against the skin but with the insulation and cushioning benefits of the thicker sock and b) the boot rubs the thick sock over the thin one, not over the skin - i.e. no blisters, especially in that soft, mobile, wrinkly skin on the back of the ankle between the heal and the joint.

My Bold ..... That is how I chose my first pair of Brasher Boots because they then offered 1/2 sizes ... and I too for more years than I can remember have worn a thin inner sock and then my main sock for the reasons detailed in your Post .
 

NSP

LE
I used to swear by a "traditional" leather boot, too - nice and sturdy and heavy, especially when caked in mud. Then I wised up and embraced the modern fabric boot; light, flexible, breathable. What is heavy other than a means to get knackered quicker...?

But, as I say above, so much in need of a soaking in Tx Direct, especially if you're inclined to splash about going through rather than boxing around like I am.
 
Last edited:

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Sorry for the confusion, the picture shown was a new boot, but the same style as the ones I have. Here is one of my boots with the torn lining highlighted. They are still very much wearable, I just have to use a shoehorn to get past the lining.
View attachment 511532
Sorry mate... was just messin'
 
I've been using Hot Rock boots for quite a bit now. I get about 18 months/ 2 years out of a pair.
They do what they say on the box, but can be a bugger to break in due to the stiff rubber toe surround which causes some discomfort until it stretches.
They also have this weird 'flap' on the inside at the back which I presume is to support your achilles tendon, but when you put your boots on it folds down, resulting in either trying to put your boot on again, or awkwardly fishing it back up into position from the back of your leg.
The soles wear out before the anything else does and I use them for not particulalry challenging routes in the Lakes and Pennines.
I also still have a pair of old custom fitted Altberg boots (back when they were still a small outfit making boots in Richmond) which I didn't get on with at all and they were way too narrow and resoloutly refused to get comfy.
I may get around to eBay-ing them at some point
I would splash out on a 'better' brand, but suspect that I would wear those out at thesame rate, so don't really fancy paying over twice as much so regularly.
I have the same Altbergs. Just started wearing them again to walk the dog and to continue breaking them in. Only being 15 years so far!
 
It's been quite a while, over 40 years, since I last did any proper walking/hiking. My new girlfriend loves it and has (easily) persuaded me to start again.

Nothing fancy, we're not going up Scafell Pike yet, just local stuff.

Has anybody any experience with the boot in the title. I realise it's an entry level boot, that'll be fine by me. I've tried a pair on and was surprised how comfortable they are, straight out of the box.

Now, our walks are going to get more rigorous once I build up my strength and will be incorporated into our wild camping. (I've been doing that for years, but on motorcycles, ) so my question really is, should I buy these and upgrade later or is this a good boot that will last a few years?

I'm not looking at any other entry level boot. Just after views on this partictular brand and model.

Cheers.
Nothing wrong with them, I got a pair gifted to me and they are comfy and still giving good service, coped with Nevis ok. Support the ankle well, sole is a bit soft compound and wears quick if you go on gravel or tarmac a bit. They do benefit from a good spray with fabsil every now and then too. Even if I had paid for them, for the price I would rate them pretty good, had these a couple of years and most night chuck 15 mile at them with no dramas.

Edited to add after reading rest of post, my review tends to agree with @Speedy , they are not the best but they do the job they are supposed to which for a fairly cheap bit of kit is fine.
 

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