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Karrimor Hot Rock.

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Not necessarily, old bean.

I paid nearly ninety sheets for a pair of Merrell ankle boots as they were Gore-Tex and the sole looked sturdy and grippy, and I've regretted it ever since - the soles react like ice-skates on wet rock, wet concrete, wet leaf-litter, wet grass and obviously ice, basically, anything that's wet, is found on the ground and is in West Scotland. The uppers are quite good at keeping the wet out, but that's not really reassuring when the soles are trying to kill me in weather conditions that barely start out as mildly moist.

I only nearly fell on my face twice before I decided to relegate them to dry weather use only and bought myself a pair of Magnum 8.0 Cougars from an online shoppe. They may not be fully waterproof but they grip like velcro gloves on a sheep on ice and all the other stuff l listed earlier.

More than likely the wrong boots for the task. Did you check? If they have mountain soles, they will be designed for deeper mud / substrate and have deeper welts

Most of the big players use Vibram soles (including both Merrell and Hi-Tec) the material is common across most boot manufacturers.

Gore Tex boots are actually tested for grip. They slide the boot across a metal sheet covered in washing up liquid and measure the friction / resistance.

This test is not performed on most non GTX boots.
 

TamH70

MIA
More than likely the wrong boots for the task. Did you check? If they have mountain soles, they will be designed for deeper mud / substrate and have deeper welts

Most of the big players use Vibram soles (including both Merrell and Hi-Tec) the material is common across most boot manufacturers.

Gore Tex boots are actually tested for grip. They slide the boot across a metal sheet covered in washing up liquid and measure the friction / resistance.

This test is not performed on most non GTX boots.

My Merrells don't come with Vibram soles - they're fitted with Merrell Select-Grip ones instead. By which I take it that they select what surfaces they want to grip onto and screw you if you disagree with them. I had a really expensive pair of Asolo boots decades ago and they had the same problem.

Only I didn't find out how crap they were until I was halfway along the Lairig Ghru track in the Cairngorms, walked on a wet patch of rock and things escalated from there.

My Magnums have slip-resistant and oil-resistant soles on them, and they're not kidding - but they don't have Vibram branding on them either.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
More than likely the wrong boots for the task. Did you check? If they have mountain soles, they will be designed for deeper mud / substrate and have deeper welts

Most of the big players use Vibram soles (including both Merrell and Hi-Tec) the material is common across most boot manufacturers.

Gore Tex boots are actually tested for grip. They slide the boot across a metal sheet covered in washing up liquid and measure the friction / resistance.

This test is not performed on most non GTX boots.
With regards to your first point - not always... Mountain boots (B1 & B2) generally have stiffer soles, and often crampon grooves. Deeper welts are usually an indicator of winter boots, with the corresponding more flexible sole. There are obviously crossovers between these two styles.

Vibram is / has become less of an indicator of quality as they have sold themselves to pretty much anyone - and produced soles to the spec of the buyer rather than offered their range 'as is'.
"Many shoe companies came to Vibram and had them create speciality soles for their shoes, which were becoming increasingly specialised for different sports, seasons, and markets, including companies like Vasque, Danner, Scarpa, and others. If you look at hiking boots, mids, trail runners, and other outdoor shoes today, every single new shoe has its own unique outsole. That’s diluted that exclusiveness of the Vibram brand since it’s hard to tell if any of these unique the outsoles make any difference at all and which is best."
Michelin & Continental are expending some effort in using their tyre grip technology in the footwear market, particularly the 'winter grip' stuff.
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
Many thanks for all your comments and experiences. Much appreciated although I was only really interested in the boots in the title.
I tried different types over the weekend, but I was attracted to them purely on the comfort straight from the box. Despite probably being better in the long run, I don't want the hassle of breaking a pair in.

Cheers again, except for the poster of Dems My Shoes. He's on my watch list.
 

Slime

LE
I bought some hot rocks recently.

My proper hiking boots are Salomons and Heavier Karrimors.
I picked up the blue/orange hot rocks from Sports Direct to wear when doing carpentry or working on cars etc.
I’ve found them very comfy and pretty lightweight.

They obviously aren’t in the same league as other hiking boots but were a good price and will give ankle support.

I got discount in Sports Direct by using a blue light card.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
...My Magnums have slip-resistant and oil-resistant soles on them, and they're not kidding - but they don't have Vibram branding on them either.
+1 for Magnum soles, very comfy & grippy - I know a lot of people are not happy about the ankle support, or more precisely the lack of it. I have a 'summer' pair of Haix Black Eagle safety boots and a 'winter' pair of Magnum Panther safety boots, both are comfy and suitable for a full day on my feet, only the Haix needed a change of insoles though.
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
I bought some hot rocks recently.

My proper hiking boots are Salomons and Heavier Karrimors.
I picked up the blue/orange hot rocks from Sports Direct to wear when doing carpentry or working on cars etc.
I’ve found them very comfy and pretty lightweight.

They obviously aren’t in the same league as other hiking boots but were a good price and will give ankle support.

I got discount in Sports Direct by using a blue light card.
Cheers and aye, I can get the same card discount.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Michelin & Continental are expending some effort in using their tyre grip technology in the footwear market, particularly the 'winter grip' stuff.
The Conti cooperation with Adidas has resulted in some very good running shoes. Bloody good cushioning - the best I've ever used - and good grip/wear.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
He's going to look silly going up Scafel Pike in black pyjamas at this time of year.
I was thinking more like this....
1602454955299.png
 

Tyk

LE
Many thanks for all your comments and experiences. Much appreciated although I was only really interested in the boots in the title.
I tried different types over the weekend, but I was attracted to them purely on the comfort straight from the box. Despite probably being better in the long run, I don't want the hassle of breaking a pair in.

Cheers again, except for the poster of Dems My Shoes. He's on my watch list.

I bought some of the Karrimor Hot Rock boots a couple of years ago as a cheap pair to just knock about in, I generally find it a bit tricky to get a proper fit, my hooves are fairly wide and high arch and they are a good fit.

I've no complaints, in fact they're spot on for knocking about in winter and up the odd hill.
Not as durable as much more expensive boots, but since a decent fit is a pain for me and I can get 2 pairs for the price of one better brand I look at it as a fair trade off. That said my days of proper hill walking are behind me.
 
How far are you walking and over what terrain? What’s your price range?

The best boots are the ones that fit your feet. Sounds trite but I have slightly odd shaped feet that mean some boots hurt like buggery while some are like slippers.

if you’re wanting something just to get going now, I’d recommend some shoes, possibly with gore-tex until you definitely need a decent boot.

That said, if you have the cash, I love the civvy aku pilgrims. The GTX version are pretty perfect for most UK walking until you start to need crampons.

Not too great in hot weather though, I’ve a six month old pair and the tread is heavily worn on the main part of the sole. Exceptionally comfortable though.
 

Teg61

Old-Salt
Looks like new....
Sorry for the confusion, the picture shown was a new boot, but the same style as the ones I have. Here is one of my boots with the torn lining highlighted. They are still very much wearable, I just have to use a shoehorn to get past the lining.
128CDBDF-1424-45CD-B5F0-9CF408E64EA1.jpeg
 

armchair_ninja

Old-Salt
I have had these Meindl boots for 8 years now and they were fantastic straight out the box. It’s only in the last few months that the inner lining has started to come away. The outer boot itself is still in great condition, but then I regularly polish/wax them after every long walk, especially if it has been a wet one. View attachment 511506
Had my Meindls for 20 years now and still going strong. If you look after them you get what you pay for.
 
Many thanks for all your comments and experiences. Much appreciated although I was only really interested in the boots in the title.
I tried different types over the weekend, but I was attracted to them purely on the comfort straight from the box. Despite probably being better in the long run, I don't want the hassle of breaking a pair in.

Cheers again, except for the poster of Dems My Shoes. He's on my watch list.

I've had two pair of these boots plus the WTX version. They quite literally fell apart for anything above and beyond gravel paths.
 
Not too great in hot weather though, I’ve a six month old pair and the tread is heavily worn on the main part of the sole. Exceptionally comfortable though.
You’re right. I should have been clearer, I mostly use shoes throughout the months that GTX is too warm unless I’m carrying a very heavy load or the met/terrain is very boggy. Even up “proper” mountains.

After a mediocre attempt at fell running as a way to stay fit, I’ve found my ankles are less likely to roll with less support.

I’m sure someone posted on here that it is backed up by the science and why the low cut akus are now issued.
 

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