Just noticed a mate showing memory loss...

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#1
So met up with an old mate - 55ish, retired after making a pile after inventing some sort of widget - and noticed some odd behaviour.

Met up at Paddington and agreed a meeting place, the same one we used annually but turns out he couldn't remember where that was from 12 months ago or how to get to the main ticket hall from the Heathrow Express platforms and he wandered off looking for an entrance to the tube...got very irritated when I asked him if he didn't remember...

I suppose there is nothing to be done whatever the case...not sure if I should mention it to his wife though...just await the slide into oblivion.
 
#4
We had a driver 3 years ago now. His wife hid it for about six months by pre programming a very fancy truckers gps the evening before for him.
It all came to a. Head about this time of year when he had to go into an RDC he’d not been into for a year to pick up equipment with no notice. He was found crying in his cab about 500 meteres from his destination.
His GP pulled his medical the next day
( about 55 years old as well)
 
#5
We had a driver 3 years ago now. His wife hid it for about six months by pre programming a very fancy truckers gps the evening before for him.
It all came to a. Head about this time of year when he had to go into an RDC he’d not been into for a year to pick up equipment with no notice. He was found crying in his cab about 500 meteres from his destination.
His GP pulled his medical the next day
( about 55 years old as well)
At 67 I can comment with some authority, I have started to show signs of forgetfulness, nothing life changing, but worrying none the less. My Daughter , A mental health nurse, tells me this is normal in most working/retired men. As time goes by, it will gradually deteriorate to a point where driving is dangerious, and other symptoms manifest themselves to a point where even mundane tasks become hard and challenging. Hopefully I can soldier on another few years before, as I have told Mrs Sig, its a pillow and the mess webley, I do not want to be a vegetable. For men of mid 50's to show the signs of dementia is heart breaking, for them, and more so for their familys, Seek expert help, now before its too late, and acknowledge the fact its happening.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
Sorry to hear about the above worrying stories, but it may be worth checking out other things such as - medication/stress levels/perhaps get a blood test to see if there's anything else going on which might affect the ability to concentrate, it may be something easier to deal with than dementia.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#7
Lack of sleep can cause the same problems
I used to work with a lad who was not sleeping well, he was always forgetting stuff
turned out his gas boiler was giving off fumes !
only found out after the doctor did some tests
 
#8
Have a relative with dementia. Has gone from happy and fairly fit to virtual veg in less than 2 years.
OK, she is over 80, but was a very happy & fit 80.
Get it diagnosed early and you can deal with it for a while.

If it's me, whisky & mess Webley + instructions on a card if needed please.
 
#9
Have a relative with dementia. Has gone from happy and fairly fit to virtual veg in less than 2 years.
OK, she is over 80, but was a very happy & fit 80.
Get it diagnosed early and you can deal with it for a while.

If it's me, whisky & mess Webley + instructions on a card if needed please.
Father in law mid 60s and pretty much the same - gone from fully functioning to underpants on head in 2 years.

Other day he was pissing in the fruit bowl - because he thought he was in the garden (no we havent worked out that one either)
 

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
#12
It's sometimes quite frightening how quickly dememtia takes hold. My ole Ma (1920 - 2008 ) grew up on a farm in Co Kerry and was always as fit as a fit thing. She loved being outdoors and even well into her Eighties would go for hour-long walks, in spite of the arthritis in both her knees. She's the only person I've ever known who could watch the telly, do a crossword and have a conversation, all at the same time.

We all attended her 85th birthday as she was just the same as ever. However, when we visited her just over a year later, she was a completely changed person. She didn't know what day it was, or even the season. I was told by rellies to keep the conversation to the past, so that she didn't get into a panic when she couldn't remember what had happened a couple of days previously. It was heartbreaking to see her like that. There was no clear cause of death when she died at 88 years old, but I can't help thinking to myself that she had a lucid moment and thought: "I've really lost me marbles now, so fück this!" and upped and died.

You often hear about folks "suffering" from Alzheimer's, but, to me at least, they always appear as happy as a pig in shite, it's actually the rellies and friends who do the suffering.

MsG
 
#13
This is mumsnet, how dare you take advantage of a potato. Our members are the salt f those Mediterranean fields that live in africa, bloody africans own everything.

How is your corn on the cob? I cellotaped it to the water heater last year so it was ready for your visit.

QUACK
 
#15
It's sometimes quite frightening how quickly dememtia takes hold. My ole Ma (1920 - 2008 ) grew up on a farm in Co Kerry and was always as fit as a fit thing. She loved being outdoors and even well into her Eighties would go for hour-long walks, in spite of the arthritis in both her knees. She's the only person I've ever known who could watch the telly, do a crossword and have a conversation, all at the same time.

We all attended her 85th birthday as she was just the same as ever. However, when we visited her just over a year later, she was a completely changed person. She didn't know what day it was, or even the season. I was told by rellies to keep the conversation to the past, so that she didn't get into a panic when she couldn't remember what had happened a couple of days previously. It was heartbreaking to see her like that. There was no clear cause of death when she died at 88 years old, but I can't help thinking to myself that she had a lucid moment and thought: "I've really lost me marbles now, so fück this!" and upped and died.

You often hear about folks "suffering" from Alzheimer's, but, to me at least, they always appear as happy as a pig in shite, it's actually the rellies and friends who do the suffering.

MsG
So, when she died, was that before or after she had been shot to death twice by the Army? Asking for a friend.
 
#16
It's sometimes quite frightening how quickly dememtia takes hold. My ole Ma (1920 - 2008 ) grew up on a farm in Co Kerry and was always as fit as a fit thing. She loved being outdoors and even well into her Eighties would go for hour-long walks, in spite of the arthritis in both her knees. She's the only person I've ever known who could watch the telly, do a crossword and have a conversation, all at the same time.

We all attended her 85th birthday as she was just the same as ever. However, when we visited her just over a year later, she was a completely changed person. She didn't know what day it was, or even the season. I was told by rellies to keep the conversation to the past, so that she didn't get into a panic when she couldn't remember what had happened a couple of days previously. It was heartbreaking to see her like that. There was no clear cause of death when she died at 88 years old, but I can't help thinking to myself that she had a lucid moment and thought: "I've really lost me marbles now, so fück this!" and upped and died.

You often hear about folks "suffering" from Alzheimer's, but, to me at least, they always appear as happy as a pig in shite, it's actually the rellies and friends who do the suffering.

MsG
yOU PROBABLY MASTURBATED INTO YOUR INHERITANCE CHEQUE...

I cant be doing with old people, moved from uk to aus and will not go back even when they get sick.

First time i get some form of 'death notice' will have a party for some random event, then vanish....my death by heroin OD will send the GPS coordinates once Im a gonner..
 
#17
yOU PROBABLY MASTURBATED INTO YOUR INHERITANCE CHEQUE...

I cant be doing with old people, moved from uk to aus and will not go back even when they get sick.

First time i get some form of 'death notice' will have a party for some random event, then vanish....my death by heroin OD will send the GPS coordinates once Im a gonner..
You're drunk aren't you?
 

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
#18

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
Chap who joined the Navy with me came to lunch mid 2012. We noticed some disconnects in his conversation and wondered if he was now on the glide path. Not long after that he slipped on the stairs at home and had to have a general anaesthetic while his hip was pinned. NHS let him fall out of bed on the engaged side and he had to have another general while his hip was again fixed. After those two generals in relatively quick succession he went right over the edge to the point where (his wife had long been partially disabled) she had to find a care home for him. Not helped by him recently having lent money to a business contact who - predictably if my chum had still had his marbles - didn't pay it back. By mid 2013 his wife was the only person he recognised - couldn't even place the near neighbour of many years (a saint) who used to drive his wife over to visit him. Died 2016 after three years of no life at all, fully mobile, nobody upstairs, double incontinent to boot.

I can think of other cases in the family. One additional problem is that (I suspect through frustration at not being able to pin what they are trying to concentrate on) sufferers can become quite angry and aggressive.

Another contemporary died a few weeks ago of a sudden heart attack - pop! - just like that. I feel for his family but for him I think, lucky chap.

Anybody stuck with a dementia case has my deep sympathy.
 
#20
So met up with an old mate - 55ish, retired after making a pile after inventing some sort of widget - and noticed some odd behaviour.

Met up at Paddington and agreed a meeting place, the same one we used annually but turns out he couldn't remember where that was from 12 months ago or how to get to the main ticket hall from the Heathrow Express platforms and he wandered off looking for an entrance to the tube...got very irritated when I asked him if he didn't remember...

I suppose there is nothing to be done whatever the case...not sure if I should mention it to his wife though...just await the slide into oblivion.

Bad memory in relation to places and routes is a typical symptom of dementia; people who are just "old" usually retain a strong recognition for places and faces, even if they're forgetful about minor things.

In my opinion, you should most definitely mention it to his wife.

- She may or may not be aware of a problem, but hearing it from a third party friend will at least assure her that its not her "imagination" or something;

- If she's not aware of it, then the pair of them may be actually be suffering a period of marriage stress without realising that there is a clinical problem as the cause of it all;

- Hearing that a third person has noticed a problem is often helpful in persuading a sufferer to agree to have a check up at a memory clinic, whereas they may resist a "nagging" partner.


One of my builders, having spent a couple of weeks tripping over my old man (Alzheimers and vascular dementia), has himself suddenly realised that his old dad is not just being "obnoxious and difficult", but is almost certainly several years into dementia of some sort. They've now got him into a clinic and had an initial diagnosis.
 
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