Just how 'Local' is 'Local' Produce ?

#1
OK, it's Friday night, I might be taking a risk here, but bearing in mind the impending event that I shall refrain from naming and the effect it will have on subtle little things like being able to get spuds by the pound again and being able to do countless other things currently prohibited by regulations which, amongst other things, stridently support 'regional' and 'local' produce and manufacture, I give you this little story:

Here I am in Catalunya, fierce in it's national identity as different from Espanya. Yesterday I went into a Carrefour supermarket ( a French chain, note. ) in Badalona, just next to BCN. I noticed a display stating Local Produce....(well, wherever I am I am fully in support of anything local that's good- which it usually is, especially in the food line). Some nice stuff, including 150g jars of things like pureed tomato, special pesto...so I grabbed a jar of pureed peppers - cheap too, at 1.50 E. Got it home and had a look at the label. The firm was from Rioja. That is about as local to Catalunya as Birmingham is to Norwich.......but, at a push, I suppose, considering Carrefour is French, it's local. Arrr but, yerrr, but, no but, as a dear Little Britainer used to say........a close examination of the small print under the ingredients revealed the interesting inscription 'Product of Peru'.

Would you call that a breach of EU regulations? It's been centuries since I studied EU law, but I am rather tempted to go back to the shop, photo the display, photo the labelling and then get Carrefour fined....law aint just there to piss on the poor y'know!

But more generally, any examples of that 'This is Genuine Local Produce' shite.








...oh fuck, here comes ROPs again....
 
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#3
I would suggest that if you buy from a large supermarket chain like Carrefour or Tescos, you'll be lucky to get anything that's produced within a couple of hundred miles, and even then it will have been processed/packaged at a central location and distributed from there.
I buy my meat from a local butcher so I know exactly where the meat comes from (his beef will even have the farm from which it came on it) I buy my eggs from a local farm and my fish from the local fish market (luckily I live in a fishing community). The best place for veg is the local saturday farmers market, but I can't always get there.
Supermarkets are convenient but don't expect anything really fresh or local.
 
#4
'T Wife and I go to a local farmers market normally twice a month. We try to always get our vegetables and local meat from there. The pork we get around here is flaming good.
One of the farmers grows Romanesc Broccolis what is really tasty.
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#6
Tesco were caught out by running an own brand line of stuff with names like 'Manor Farm's or 'Tunswell Orchard' to suggest local UK produce when in fact it was just the usual shipped in gear.

You can get local produce, but not on the scale to support everyone or their tastes, hence why we import so much.
 
#10
If you avoid the supermarkets there are plenty of places where you can buy truly local produce roud here (Cheshire). Our local butcher sells meat produced no more than 10 miles away, and there are several farm shops and local suppliers who can tell you almost the field where the stuff was grown.
 
#11
Tesco were caught out by running an own brand line of stuff with names like 'Manor Farm's or 'Tunswell Orchard' to suggest local UK produce when in fact it was just the usual shipped in gear.

You can get local produce, but not on the scale to support everyone or their tastes, hence why we import so much.
Tescos one of my pet hates, especially the way they treat their farming suppliers. So many of this country's dairy farmers have gone tits up because of their policies. My Uncle used to be a Pig farmer, some of the problems he had as a producer stem from that company.
 
#12
#13
Tescos one of my pet hates, especially the way they treat their farming suppliers. So many of this country's dairy farmers have gone tits up because of their policies. My Uncle used to be a Pig farmer, some of the problems he had as a producer stem from that company.
Pack of cunts as I have said elsewhere...hate the shites...
 
#14
Tescos one of my pet hates, especially the way they treat their farming suppliers. So many of this country's dairy farmers have gone tits up because of their policies. My Uncle used to be a Pig farmer, some of the problems he had as a producer stem from that company.
All smiles and handshakes, lull the farmer in with promises of buying all they can produce, then two, or three, years down the line things change. When they know that any alternative purchasers the farmer potentially had tucked away have disappeared into the ether things change. That is when they come in with price reductions, tales of cheaper produce available from a country ending in 'ia'. The farmer is then royally phuqed; go under, or take the reduced income.

It is a common corprate business model. Allegedly M&S did it to their clothing suppliers in the UK too.
 
#15
From memory, which is ageing and therefore fallible, the catch is in the wording.
If the product is processed in the EU, in any way -including packaging - it can be labelled 'Produced in the EU' .
 
#16
Stuff Tescos, anyway back on thread. A few miles from here, we've got a Pub that has a produce stall in his car park. Have yet to go there. Have eaten in the place, he claimed all his food was local produce.
 
#17
“Local” is en elastic term, like “produced”, “sluaghtered”, “made in” etc.
Like Dark Nit, within not many miles of my house I have excellent butchers, growers etc. I can buy milk unpasteurised at the farm gate and get fresh landed fish. But I don’t have the time for most of that. I recently had a beer made locally but it had US hops in it.
I don’t know whether I can be arsed to sweat it that much anymore.
 
#18
Taste it good, or taste it bad?

So good.... nothing compares to veg that were harvested that morning, then brought in to the market.

I love walking around their markets, the variety, on veg and seafood...... then the restaurants serve whatever they bought in the mornings, nothing imported.

Only seasonal stuff, no Peruvian strawberries etc.

And the EGGS....... you never see anything like them, not huge, but the yolks are enormous, and bright orange
 
#19
I recall seeing in the Morrisons in Fort William some descaling additive that you put in your washing machine to stop the hard water clagging it up with limescale.

The label had turned brown with age and was starting to peel. The "reduced to 10p" label was suffering from similar effects of age.

It's how I assume most supermarkets work.
 

Trans-sane

LE
Book Reviewer
#20
If you avoid the supermarkets there are plenty of places where you can buy truly local produce roud here (Cheshire). Our local butcher sells meat produced no more than 10 miles away, and there are several farm shops and local suppliers who can tell you almost the field where the stuff was grown.
I buy my veg from the green grocer in the market. Top young lad that won young market trader of the year award last year. Most of his spuds, carrots and other root veg is grown on rixton moss. The far end of it MIGHT be ten miles away. On the rare occasions I buy fish it's from his dad or cousin (they are the market's fish mongers). All my meat comes from the butcher in the same market. He used to go to school with my big brother and is fourth or fifth generation in the business. Why do I buy there? It's cheaper than the supermarket and so much fucking better.
 

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