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Just got this in my inbox

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
#1
I sometimes get mails from a british army mailing list i belong to; usually its just "Hi, the armees gr8, hw do i bikkme a souldjer?" kind of thing but today i got the below.

First the news, then the comment, then who we are.

NEWS
Russia blames new UK PM for row
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/6907630.stm

Mr Lavrov said Russian extradition requests had gone unanswered
Russia's foreign minister has blamed Gordon Brown's takeover as UK prime minister for a row about extradition.
Sergei Lavrov told reporters that each new government needs "to find its own line" after assuming power.
But he added that he hoped common sense would prevail and that the situation was "moving in that direction".
Earlier, Russia said it will expel four UK embassy staff in the dispute about Moscow's refusal to extradite a suspect over Alexander Litvinenko's murder.
On Monday four Russian embassy staff were expelled from the UK and the visa facilitation process for Russian officials was suspended.
In retaliation, Russia said the four British embassy staff must leave the country within 10 days, and Moscow is to review visa applications for UK officials.
'Find its place'
Speaking during a press conference at the end of the Middle East Quartet's meeting in Lisbon, Mr Lavrov said it was up to Britain to determine how long the crisis would last.
He added: "We understand that when a new government comes to power in any country, it is seeking to find its place, so to say, seeking its own line.
KEY EVENTS IN CASE
1 November 2006: Alexander Litvinenko meets Andrei Lugovoi and another Russian at a London hotel
23 November 2006: Litvinenko dies in a London hospital
24 November 2006: A Litvinenko statement accuses Russian President Vladimir Putin of involvement in his death. Experts say Litvinenko was poisoned
6 December 2006: UK police say they are treating the death as murder
22 May 2007: Lugovoi should be charged with Litvinenko's murder, British prosecutors say
28 May 2007: UK makes formal request for Lugovoi's extradition from Russia



"Therefore, I can, to a large extent, see in what is happening also the factor of a new government."
Mr Lavrov condemned what he described as Britain's refusal to co-operate with Russian extradition requests, and said that Russia had responded immediately when the British authorities asked permission to send investigators to Moscow last December.
Similar Russian requests, he said, had gone unanswered for months.
Mr Lavrov said his government had still not seen "actual documents" relating to the Litvinenko affair and consequently did not know what had led the British authorities to regard Mr Lugovoi as a suspect.
Mr Litvinenko, an ex-KGB agent who had taken UK citizenship, died of exposure to radioactive polonium-210 in London in November 2006.
Traces of the radioactive isotope was found in several places visited by another former agent, Andrei Lugovoi, who denies involvement.
'Mini crisis'
UK Foreign Secretary David Miliband said he was "disappointed" by Russia's decision to expel British Embassy staff - a move he called a "completely unjustified".
But Russian President Vladimir Putin said he thought both countries would overcome the "mini crisis".
Under the European Convention on Extradition 1957, Russia has the right to refuse the extradition of a citizen and its constitution expressly forbids extradition.
The UK has the right to request Mr Lugovoi be tried in Russia, but the UK's director of public prosecutions, Sir Ken Macdonald, has already turned down the offer.
The UK's director of public prosecutions has recommended Mr Lugovoi be tried for murder by "deliberate poisoning".




COMMENT
There can only be one interpretation of the choreographed dual expulsion of 4 diplomats cooked up by the UK and Russian Foreign Ministry mandarins and sold to wet-behind-the-ears UK Foreign Secretary David Miliband.

We have witnessed a complete capitulation by a craven UK state terrified of offending Putin.

New Prime Minister Gordon Brown has just given the green light to Putin to send assassins after all his political enemies in Britain.

“Peace in our time” eh Gordon?

Appeasement it looks like. What is the alternative?

The diplomatic alternative would be to break off diplomatic relations with Putin’s regime and to oppose Putin and his representatives being welcomed at any of the international forums.

The British government should seek de-recognition of Putin’s government from the United Nations, the NATO-Russian Partnership for Peace, G8 and any other such international body.

Relations with Russia should be handled publicly via the international media and officially by opening up channels to the Russian opposition, who should be recognised formally as the only ones fit to speak for Russia.

That’s diplomacy but the British response should not be limited to diplomacy - a military response is required.

The British military should return Putin’s assassination in full by carrying out assassination attempts against the person of Putin himself wherever possible when Putin ventures outside Russia - most easily on the territories of countries allied to Britain or in Britain itself should Putin be so stupid as to come here when we are after his blood.
Now that would be the British bulldog biting back!

Instead of unleashing the dogs of war, Prime Minister Brown has capitulated to Putin’s international reign of assassination and terror - what a shame and what a disgrace to Britain.

If Brown will not escalate this fake diplomatic ballet into a hot personal war against Putin (but not against our Russian friends) he should resign or be impeached and removed as Prime Minister.

Get Putin!


WHO WE ARE

Of interest to the friends of the Russian people who say that Vladimir Putin is guilty of assassinating Russian patriots like Alexander Litvinenko and Anna Politkovskaya.

Sickened by Putin’s Kremlin reign of bloody terror and poison against his critics?
Think it is time for Putin to have a taste of his own medicine?
Determined to see Putin brought to justice for his terrible crimes?
Want to see a Russia and a world free from Putin for ever?
Then this group is for you!

Settings for this group are to allow as anonymous as possible use of the group’s features while making it difficult for Putin’s spies to trace group members if you are brave enough to join.

So stay anonymous and stay safe. Putin is out to get us all but there are more of us than there are fools who follow Putin so we’ll get him first before he gets us.
My bold, italics and underline.

WTF is this about? Is there really a group of people so detached from reality that they think A) we should do soemthing like this, or B) we can? Who we gonna send, SAS badged cadets (dont laugh, someone once told me there was such a bunch of hooligans!)

Has anyone got anything like this?

PS, kgb resident, dont stand up and shout "You see, this proves everything i have been saying!"
 
#4
Just four lines less, and that could have come from TripWire....



shifting this to the grownups playground because I feel this could get better responses there without it degenerating too far. mk
 
#5
tommy_cooker said:
im sure we're going to be seing that famous labrador of a certain user anytime soon! a user of a russian nature.
Thanks for not using a word infamous.

It's an article written by BBC's veteran journalist Paul Reynolds

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/7192044.stm

Why Britain withholds Lugovoi evidence

In the diplomatic tit-for-tat over the Alexander Litvinenko affair, Britain is refusing to take one step open to it under a European convention governing extradition.

It could give the Russian authorities the evidence it has against the former KGB officer Andrei Lugovoi and ask them to take over the case themselves.

In theory, it could publish the evidence itself in any event. This would show to the world how strong its case is. Without such information, it is much easier for Russia to dismiss the extradition request as politically motivated.
Likely there are no any credible evidences.
 

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