Jungle Warfare & Helicopters

#1
A serious question!!!!!

Which British Helicopter is best suited to a jungle warfare enviroment....
not to include the Apache.....
 
#3
Its not quite a clean cut as that though is it.

Puma HC1's operated for many years successfully in Belize and only budget cuts caused their withdraw.

Surely a good helicopter for jungle operations is one that is a very steady platform for rappelling from?
 
#4
TheHelpfulStacker said:
Its not quite a clean cut as that though is it.

Puma HC1's operated for many years successfully in Belize and only budget cuts caused their withdraw.

Surely a good helicopter for jungle operations is one that is a very steady platform for rappelling from?
Rapelling!! We're British we abseil!

Surely you need a small helicopter that can offload a at least a team of 6 and be able to carry casualties away
 
#5
meiktilaman said:
TheHelpfulStacker said:
Its not quite a clean cut as that though is it.

Puma HC1's operated for many years successfully in Belize and only budget cuts caused their withdraw.

Surely a good helicopter for jungle operations is one that is a very steady platform for rappelling from?
Rapelling!! We're British we abseil!

Surely you need a small helicopter that can offload a at least a team of 6 and be able to carry casualties away
I was always under the impression that abseiling is done from a fixed object/against a surface whereas rappelling is done suspended away from a fixed surface, ie: from a bridge, helicopter, overhang.
 

TheIronDuke

ADC
Book Reviewer
#6
I always thought rappelling was Belgian for Surprise Sex?

TheHelpfulStacker said:
Er, would that be the Aérospatiale Puma? Theres a clue in the name. and the funny é

It’s a French sock.

And the Sea King, while satisfyingly noisy and smelly, is a Septic sock.

We don’t make budgies, although Arthur D. Wilberforce of Arbuthnot, Yorkshire did invent them.

So the answer is, a S-64 Skycrane. Or the CH-54. Or one of those sexy Bell Jets with retractable wheels. Whatever. So long as it turns up on time and scares the monkeys, it’s the best Brit jungle warfare helicopter.
 
#7
TheHelpfulStacker said:
meiktilaman said:
TheHelpfulStacker said:
Its not quite a clean cut as that though is it.

Puma HC1's operated for many years successfully in Belize and only budget cuts caused their withdraw.

Surely a good helicopter for jungle operations is one that is a very steady platform for rappelling from?
Rapelling!! We're British we abseil!

Surely you need a small helicopter that can offload a at least a team of 6 and be able to carry casualties away
I was always under the impression that abseiling is done from a fixed object/against a surface whereas rappelling is done suspended away from a fixed surface, ie: from a bridge, helicopter, overhang.
Whichever. But I still think the Wessex was/is very steady.
 
#8
TheHelpfulStacker said:
Its not quite a clean cut as that though is it.

Puma HC1's operated for many years successfully in Belize and only budget cuts caused their withdraw.

Surely a good helicopter for jungle operations is one that is a very steady platform for rappelling from?
No spares was the real reason, money cannot buy what doesn't exist.
 
#9
TheHelpfulStacker said:
meiktilaman said:
[



I was always under the impression that abseiling is done from a fixed object/against a surface whereas rappelling is done suspended away from a fixed surface, ie: from a bridge, helicopter, overhang.

Mmmm best tell Brize norton that they been running the wrong course for about 20 years and they need to rename their Helicopter Abseil Intructors course!

trust me mate rapelling is Americanism!!!
 

TheIronDuke

ADC
Book Reviewer
#10
Unsworth said:
Whichever. But I still think the Wessex was/is very steady.
The Wessex? Home to the 'Westland Scandal', using ubiquitous Sikorski technology and now owned by the people who brought you the MV Augusta?

A wop sock?

One hates to nit-pick, but a British helicopter, as opposed to a British fabricated helicopter, is a bit of a mares nest.
 
#11
What about the old fashioned Scout?
 
#12
Pyrex said:
What about the old fashioned Scout?
I always liked the early Scout, a very fine little machine. We used them in Thailand and much of the Far East. Very reliable, small, decent turn of speed, and tremendous visibility with that glass bubble front end. Always with the doors off, of course.
 
#13
Surely the question is meant to be "which helicopter in service with the British etc"?

Wouldn't Merlin give it a good crack? If there were enough to go around? And as they use the Bell 212 jobbies there, you would like to hope that they were best suited or surely they would use something else (Lynx?).

Maybe the Westland licenced S-60 Black Hawk would be pretty good?
 
#14
Whatever it is it needs:
- winch capability (essential in Jungle environment)
- good crash worthiness
- ability to carry 4-8 men with patrol kit
- stretcher capability
- skids, not wheels
- options as a weapon platform if reqd

Huey, Wessex, Sea King and Puma have all been used to good effect. Merlin etc too big unless you are using for large troop numbers onto large LZs ala Air Cav style. Had to insert the entire recce Pl by Gazelle in Belize; GPMGs had to be stripped down in order to fit.
 
#15
Unsworth said:
Pyrex said:
What about the old fashioned Scout?
I always liked the early Scout, a very fine little machine. We used them in Thailand and much of the Far East. Very reliable, small, decent turn of speed, and tremendous visibility with that glass bubble front end. Always with the doors off, of course.
The Scout is the answer!!!!

It didn't have a 'bubble' though, that belonged to the Sioux.
 
#16
Lynx was used in Belize, but has now been replaced by COMR Bell 212's. I would say that although motivated by having a fixed cost (i.e. We pay you X and you keep X number of Helicopters servicable from X location), the 212 is also a better choice than the Lynx.
 
#17
lsquared said:
Unsworth said:
Pyrex said:
What about the old fashioned Scout?
I always liked the early Scout, a very fine little machine. We used them in Thailand and much of the Far East. Very reliable, small, decent turn of speed, and tremendous visibility with that glass bubble front end. Always with the doors off, of course.
The Scout is the answer!!!!

It didn't have a 'bubble' though, that belonged to the Sioux.
I liked the Sioux even more, but what I was bumbling on about was this: http://brownwater-navy.com/vietnam/yrbm2/BumbleBee.jpg I don't recall seeing (your) Scout too often in that theatre, but saw it quite regularly in the UK.

However, I was lifted out of a base in NE Thailand to the medical station at Ubon (for a small scratch) in a Sioux. A case of over-dramatics from the MO. The Air Corps pilot took great delight in flying down the laterite dust roads at altitudes of about six feet, generating a dust storm and lifting up occasionally to clear a bus or truck - to the obvious disconcertment of their drivers. At Ubon the medics were extremely unhappy to see me walk from the Sioux, having geared themselves up for a stretcher case. Still got the scars of their stitches in my leg....

Still the Sioux ride was superb, a really lovely machine - if a little skeletal in build. Sadly my journey back to base was a lift in a Bedford RL.
 
#18
Preferred the Wessex to the Whirlwind in Borneo. Only used Puma in Belize.
My favourite was the UH1H though the Blackhawk is excellent.

Depends what they're being used for, one thing I remember we (Brits) never had enough.
 

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