Jump Refusal

Dubb_al_Ibn

War Hero
The guy throwing him out is wearing the old KMLK/ Berezhka (birch tree) camouflage. Then there is a variety of other patterns and solid colour uniforms which makes me think these are Interior Ministry or reservists.
Happy to be corrected, though.
 
I did that two week free-fall parachute course at Netheravon. I've done lots of rock climbing so never thought I was frightened of heights till I got into the doorway on one of those tiny Islander planes. Apparently as my static line pulled out my chute I actually attempted to climb up the risers. As if that was going to help.

At the debrief in the packing hall the instructor asked "How did it go?", I said I can't remember; I just shit myself and it all went blank. I was fine once the chute was open though and landed okay(ish).

They'd always pack the plane tight and put whoever they thought was going to refuse as first; this was to add psychological pressure because (they said) that if they didn't jump they'd have to land the plane to let them off and they'd be messing everyone about.
 

Oyibo

LE
Didn't the Russians try parachuting a BMP with all the crew inside and turned them all into strawberry jam ?
The story was that they tried it with monkeys first. The monkeys all got powdered spines, so they then tried it with humans.

I seem to remember there's a bit more to it than that, but I like my version.
 
Didn't the Russians try parachuting a BMP with all the crew inside and turned them all into strawberry jam ?
I believe so. It was a BMD. The retro pack didn't activate and it landed very hard. I remember hearing that dit in the 80s.

What were this lot lobbing from? Looks like a Mil-8/17 with the clamshells removed.
 

P.O.N.T.I

War Hero
I did that two week free-fall parachute course at Netheravon. I've done lots of rock climbing so never thought I was frightened of heights till I got into the doorway on one of those tiny Islander planes. Apparently as my static line pulled out my chute I actually attempted to climb up the risers. As if that was going to help.

At the debrief in the packing hall the instructor asked "How did it go?", I said I can't remember; I just shit myself and it all went blank. I was fine once the chute was open though and landed okay(ish).

They'd always pack the plane tight and put whoever they thought was going to refuse as first; this was to add psychological pressure because (they said) that if they didn't jump they'd have to land the plane to let them off and they'd be messing everyone about.
I have seen several people 'assisted' out of that Islander
 
The OP's video does not show IDF, but in my day I witnessed refusals at the door more than once. The PJI's were well drilled and would assist the refuser out of the door.
In the IDF reserves we would do at least one jump a year to maintain the skill until around 1991, when apparently for budgetary reasons, we stopped the annual training.
One day we received call up orders for a stint of reserve service. After 4 years without jumping, some bright spark at brigade must have manged to wangle an airborne ex for us. The men of the battalion showed up on the morning of the allotted day.
We hadn't practiced for 4 years, the chutes and harnesses were a new type and we had just one morning for refresher training (some of us had started as paras 15 years earlier). The morning was spent learning how to harness up, aroll to the left, a roll to the right and on the bus.
Hearing there was dissent in the ranks, the OC held a parade on the apron and excused the dissenters, trying to make it look as if they were the ones that were out of line.
I was somewhere in one of the two lines of men boarding the Herc, standing in the noise, propwash and stink of fuel, Suddenly I saw someone come barging out from inside the plane, running down the ramp and hurling his lid onto the tarmac in evident frustration. It was my old mate the Sarge and his nerves had overcome him. As far as I'm concerned both he and the dissenters were vindicated, as four years lack of practice and borderline too high ground wind led to a high level of injuries, including two OCs and the deputy brigade commander.
I was jumping with my Barrett for the first time and was unaccustomed to hefting its weight and length. The drop started and when I had shuffled up and reached the spot behind the next guy in the door, I swivelled around towards it. I must have lost my balance because I started falling backwards. Like skilled and experienced night club bouncers, the PJIs caught me and propelled me smoothly out.
When I landed, the easterly ground wind was stronger than I'd ever experienced and I was feebly unsuccesful in getting my chute to collapse. I was being dragged across the desert and probably would have ended up in Gaza except that a mate who had got free noticed my predicament, ran over and jumped on my canopy.
 
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Dubb_al_Ibn

War Hero
A couple of years ago there was a story that they were going to try to drop a BMD 4 with a crew inside. However, I think the Russian VDV general quoted may have been taking the proverbial. I've not read of anything since.
 
Ahem .... I may have told this one before.

BAOR 1980'ish and I have got to know the Nazi equivelent of RSM 16 Para Bde

His name is Werner Glose , and I dont mind saying it as a) he is very dead and b)he was a class act .

Don't get me wrong , he is German, [ He never married ] he was a competent Skydiver , I spoke the same language.

Anyway, one day he invites me to a day of free CH 47 jumping a few Km down the road at Augsdorf DZ..
I bring along a mate Dixie ( 2 Para )

Park L/R , over to CH 47 and he says Welkommen ! ( Nice bloke Werner )

So we load up maybe 15 S/L' almost there' Falchirmjaeger, The German National 8 Way Parachute Team ( all military this year ) and me and Dixie.

WokkaWokkaWokka etc.

At 300m we run in to unload the straps.
First bloke - GO! ! He goes
Second Go! He goes.

Third : Go !
nothing
Go !
nothing


I watched an RSM - live ( OK he was german ) punch a bloke off the tailgate - to keep it moving.

'twas a thing of beauty, and I will cherish it to my dying day
 
and the deputy brigade commander.
I was jumping with the Barrett for the first time and was unaccustomed to hefting its weight, length and bulk.
Had the Deputy Brigade Commander caught you shagging his wife a week before the jump perchance?
 
Wasn't there a story in the early seventies that the army dressed up a psycholigist as a Major in the Parachute Regiment. They wanted to see the effect that it would have on the troops if an officer of that rank refused to jump.

Come the day, large Nato exercise, packed C130 flying low level for several hours with all the spewing and farting with fear mixed up with the smell of oil and avgas, even though the despatchers were in on the act, when the green light came on he was propelled out, by the force of the rest of the stick desperate to get out of the aircraft.
 

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