Joining up from afar

Discussion in 'The Other Half' started by Imshi-Yallah, Sep 22, 2004.

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  1. First post here so hello to all.

    Im currently pursuing a career in the british army, haven't got very far (RCB briefing still to do), which is great, soldiering and more specifically being an officer have always been the only things Ive really wanted to do...
    The big drawback is I'm born and bred in the Irish republic,; my family arent over the moon about my goals but I can live with that.

    The bigger problem is my girlfriend whos very much a long term prospect at this stage has no intention of leaving Ireland.
    She seems happy to carry things on long distance, but I wonder how other people with similar situations have coped?
  2. Cunas a Ta Tu?

    Being Irish is not a problem in the British forces there are more than you would think. Paddys (being one meself) have always joined what I would consider to be the best army in the world. Why join the Irish army? ops? very few and far between. The Irish army is essentially a defence force and not designed to fight a war nor is there any political will or political pride in these soldiers whatsoever, logistical support under the PfP is the limit.

    Being a Paddy during the troubles did cast a certain amount of suspicion with PIRA being overtlly active but you will find that after depot all that dissapears. RTE broadcast a documentary a few years ago called "All the Queens men" focusing on those Southerners who were serving in the Micks, RIR etc. If you can track it down I strongly recomended it You will also find quite a few Paddys in Airborne and infantry units

    I would wish you the very best of luck in joining the best trained but most politically betrayed body of men in the world (chest swelling pride) As for the girlfriend, sorry mate forget it.

    Best of luck

  3. Hmmm while our defence policy is indeed fairly (Can I swear here?), I think the fanciful idea that we'd become the PFPs stevedores was dropped after Timor, now our deployments are getting steadily more warlike as is the kit, I enlisted in the reserves here the year before Timor and Ive been in a position to see the changes happening.

    The british army does nonetheless offer more opportunities, especially if your starting to worry about your age (the powers that be in the Irish army still have a distressing affection for 19yo 2LTs).
    Was hoping for something a bit more encouraging on the girlfriend issue though, I noticed when I did the PIOFAMVIS that there were a lot of single 26-30 year olds about the place, is it more or less inevitable for infantry officers?
  4. There was at one time, a five year waiting list to join the Irish army! this was during the 80's when everyone bolted from the country. Officers are a bit of a mixed bag some straight from school, some from the University officer training corps (some good & some snotty arrogant kids) and a healthy ammount of former rankers. I recall that the maximum age was 25 for officers this may have changed now.

    While serving I had a long distance relationship but they rarely work out and take a lot of work, just look at the divorce rates amoung married soldiers.

    I would also keep it a bit quiet about going the UK forces as while the terrorist threat has visibly diminished it has not gone away and who really needs to know? Theres also always some puesdo republican knobber looking to have a go.
  5. If your after a bit of good news along the relationship side of things, dont read this, but if its meant to be its meant to be.

    Alot of people come into the services in a situation similar to yours, some manage to keep the relationship going. which is good for them. But others move on from their old flame as distance becomes a problem.

    If your serious do the decent thing and marry the girl, more rights are to be had that way. Otherwise if you tell the OC about relationship problems, and want time of (all though more sympathetic these days) expect a two finger salute.

    Just for the record theres plenty more fish in the sea. :wink:
  6. Think you have to atleast give it a go. I have been - personally - in a situation where I didnt pursue a reg' army officer career because of then fiancee - and have also managed to maintain long-distance relationships.

    I have often wonderd how things could have been different if I had stuck with, and seen through the reg' side of things. (Especially seeing as the bint in question and I split up a few years later - oh how I laughed!)
    Would advise you to stick with the army for sure, as has been said 'there are plenty more fish in the sea'.

    Long distance relationships can work - but they are by no means easy and do require some effort and commitment on both sides. See how it goes. Personally think that rushing into a wedding at this point is not the answer - if it's going to work it will work without a signed piece of paper as much as with one!
  7. Imshi-Yallah, if you are under 30, don't even think about getting married and giving up you ambitions.

    Try and imagine her in 20 years, fat, droopy t1ts, thinks that giving you a BJ is disgusting, your kids are chavs etc

    You will be one of those sad walts that knows the lines to every war movie, attends every recruiting show and knows more than the lads on the stand who think you are odd and constantly bore people with ' I nearly joined the Army once, I could've been in the Paras/ Marines/ Cav/ etc. BUT .........

    A wise man once said to me ' the world will never run out of pretty girls or red sports cars'

    Work it out mate
  8. Yeah, verily I say unto thee.........
  9. How it going pal, (Im on a mates account to answer your questions)
    I joined in May 88 after a usual stint in the FCA and even in those days been a paddy always seemed to go in my favour within my Battery and Regiment and any other external units I met in my time. I would have liked to do a stint in South Leb with the PDF just for the experience but over all I think joining Brits has been a very good move for the people Ive met and places Ive been(althuogh at the time it dosnt seem like that) espically when you go home on leave and see every one else doing the same old thing and you can spin dits about the brothels youve done in far off places as well as been part of a professional army you can have pride in (even though it seems like we scrimp for every thing we need to our job). Now on the flip side relationships, in a five period back in the 90's, met my woman first tour of the North, engaged on the second and seperated during the third. Now Im at the stage where I feel the need to have at least one failed relationship a year to feel good about myself. Only 6 years to do for a very good pension and so far its flown by. Id say go for it.

    Slan Leat