joining the ta (medical)

Discussion in 'Army Reserve' started by MIGHTY_BORO, Jan 21, 2008.

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  1. hello everone, i am in the process of joining the ta, iam waiting a date for my medical. when i was younger i had mild asthma, iam now 27 and have'nt had a attack now for 10+ years. will this effect my application.
     
  2. Same here. If it was mild when you was younger and you've not had an attack for over 10 years then I personally wouldn't mention it. It never cropped up when I was going through recruiting stage. Mind you, that was 5 years ago, I don't know the routine now. Don't imagine it's changed much.

    TBM
     
  3. Just be honest! if you hide anything it could come back to bite you in the rear!

    It did not effect my friends who was pretty much in the same position as yours!
     
  4. 10+ years sounds fine. There is a rule (cannot remember it exactly) but if you have not had to use you r inhalor for x number of years then it's ok. I'm pretty sure its less than 10 years as well.

    T C
     
  5. I HAVE'NT MENTIONED IT, LETS HOPE THE PROCESS HAS'NT CHANGED.
     
  6. Sixty

    Sixty LE Moderator Book Reviewer
    1. ARRSE Cyclists and Triathletes

    It will still appear on your medical records though whether you've declared it or not.

    You should be ok with more than ten years clear but expect them to pay more attention to your lungs anyway even despite you being above the four year threshold.
     
  7. Well, bear in mind I'm not a MO, but I understand that whether or not you've had an attack doesn't count (as you could easly be bending the truth). It's 5 years from the last time your doctor issued you medication for the condition, which would be when you were deemed free of risk.

    Best to ask either way. I've seen people drop like stones from asthma attacks after getting past the medical by ommiting key information. It's not clever as it puts other people at risk, hence the strict rules.
     
  8. HOW DO THEY TEST YOUR LUNGS?
     
  9. Yeah, that's not the drama. It's a breathing test, blow down a tube type thing. Your dilemma is your medical history, which will be looked into.
     
  10. Sixty

    Sixty LE Moderator Book Reviewer
    1. ARRSE Cyclists and Triathletes

    Peak-flow test initially ('here, breathe into this tube as hard as you can to test capacity') with spirometry tests if this isn't satisfactory. Bear in mind that this was the case a few years back but I've heard that all mentions of possible asthma now get the spyrometry tests whether your peak-flow is acceptable or not.

    Best bet is to get yourself down to the TA Centre and speak to the experts.
     
  11. WHAT IS A SPYROMETRY TEST?
     
  12. I understand that any attack since age 16 is a fail (thus not "childhood asthma"), coupled with a requirement that you have had no prescription or attack for the last 4 years if your last attack was when you were under 16.

    However:

    a. Not every MO seems to interpret the rules in the same way, so you may get through anyway.

    b. You should declare it as the outcome of an asthma attack on you and your mates whilst Terry Taleban is charging towards you with a wild glint in his eye, is bound to be less than optimal.
     
  13. SO BY THE SOUND OF IT, IT GOSE BY THE MO WHO IS DOING THE MEDICAL
     
  14. Er, no. There are different views from the different doctors on the different cases they see, that's why they are employed; to give an expert opinion on a case by case basis. The rules are somewhat open to interpritation, but I would not suggest that it's a hit and miss process.

    Do you think you have a problem, based on what people have said? Have you had an attack after the age of 16? Have you had medication given in the past 4 years? If the answers are no, no and no, get stuck in.