Joining The Paras

#1
Hi All!

So i'm 18 at the moment and currently working as an accounts apprentice and studying my AAT as a backup to the paras.

I just have a few questions regarding the joining process.

- Can I join straight from civie street?

- What are the fitness requirements?

- What can I expect from training ie: day to day?

- I'm quite a skinny guy what supplements should I be taking if any to aid with building muscle and gaining weight?

Thanks all!

Dicko
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
#2
Yes

High. Plenty of info on the army website, but basically your 2.4km run needs to be below 9.30 as a very basic start point.

Opinions vary. Some believe you can’t possibly do it without magic milkshakes, yet generations of Paras did perfectly well with a healthy balanced diet and lots of exercise. You can probably guess which camp I fall in to.

All covered dozens of times, or freely abailable on the army website.
 
#4
If you are a skinny lad you may wish to read this.

From a series of articles The Finest Army in the World

Lt Col Mike Morgan



As anybody will tell you the General Purpose Machine Gun is one helluva sexy weapon. It is known as the ‘Jimpy’ and is only surpassed in sexiness by its big sister — the 50 cal. But this is a story about the Jimpy, and the Jimpy in its sexiest guise — the GPMG SF. SF stands for ‘Sustained Fire’, and is a mod kit for the GPMG which puts it on a tripod, adds long range sights and a firing button. In this configuration the Jimpy is known as ‘Sex on Legs’.
Paras come in most shapes and sizes, although it is a very rare sight to see an overweight para. But they do come in a thin and wiry variety. Private Tim Johns was just such a variety. Short, tough and about eight stone in his Boots Combat High and helmet. He had been in 2 Para for long enough to know his way around, long enough to know what was ‘Aly’, and long enough not to have to take crap from anybody — except those few that he had to take crap from — like his platoon sergeant and the RSM — in fact anybody that outranked him by at least two grades — except ruperts of course. Tonight A Company, 2 Para is to make a night jump over Thetford training area.
42 Commando is also in the Thetford training area, setting up for a night shoot. This is to be a firepower demonstration and Captain John Issacs is the Range Officer. He has eight Jimpy SF kits set up on the firing line and 5000 rounds of mixed tracer and ball for each gun. Now a single Jimpy SF and 5000 rounds guarantees a couple of very sexy hours and will give a very impressive light and sound show. Eight Jimpy SEs is indeed a rare sight, and together they will certainly deliver an awesome display of sound and fury, as well as delivering one hell of a lot of rounds down range. The entire commando will be present to see this display. First rounds down range 2300 Hrs. Captain John Issacs is happy in his work this night.
Pvt Tim John’s C130 circles the training area, it is a bumpy ride. The wind is picking up, the drop may still be cancelled. Tim, like all the other Paras on board, just wished they would make their ******* minds up. Let’s just get off this thing one way or another, a couple of Paras have already puked and the atmosphere on board is becoming decidedly ‘interesting’. Inevitably more Paras will start to throw up in sympathy before much longer, and then the atmosphere will become ‘very interesting’.
Somebody, somewhere in the chain of command makes a decision, and the signal to ‘go’ is given. Thank god. Stand up, check kit, hook up, shuffle to the door. Final checks, door open, green light and out into the freezing night wind.
Now the para drop zone at Thetford is many miles from the Machine Gun ranges. Range use and deconfliction is one of the things the Army gets right nearly all of the time, and tonight they had got it right once again. The Paras would drop well clear of the ranges. However what they, (‘they’ being the range deconfliction staff), had not taken into account, was the law of aerodynamics, and how these laws would apply to a skinny para on a windy night.
Pvt Johns left the aircraft and was immediately aware that his chute had deployed —as his fall through space was violently halted. He looked up and checked his canopy. So far so good. The drop had been from 500 feet. Pitch black all around, but he would hit the ground in the next second or two. He braced for the landing. After several seconds had passed Tim had his first inkling that tonight could be a long one. The wind had certainly picked up, and his travel was definitely more sideways than downwards, and there was absolutely sweet **** all that he could do about it. All aircraft sounds had now died away. Several more seconds passed. Still no rendezvous with terra firma.
2255 Hrs. All is ready on the SF range. Ammo boxes open and on Captain Isaac’s orders, belts are laid into trays and top covers closed. ‘Ready!’, and each gun is cocked. The whole of 42 Commando is sitting in rows behind the gun line, they all lean forward. Should be a good night.
Pvt Johns is still floating over Thetford training area. He is just starting to get a little pissed off. Suddenly he hits the ground hard, knocks the wind out of him, the chute drags and bumps him over and through the long grass, then proceeds to drag him through a stream, a bog and various cowpats in various states of maturity. He finally releases the chute buckle and comes to a halt looking up at the stars. He is now soaking wet, covered in mud and worse and has no idea where he is. First out, move in the direction the aircraft came from. Last out, move in the direction the aircraft is going. Simple para rules for finding your mates in the dark. Trouble was he has no idea what direction the aircraft had come from, or gone to, and he certainly couldn’t hear the bloody thing. Probably back in Brize by now, with some lucky crab cleaning up para puke. He stands up and starts to gather in his chute. Couldn’t get much bloody worse.
Exactly 2300 Hrs. ‘Fire’ screams Capt Isaacs. Eight Jimpy SFs do their thing.
Pvt Tim Johns realises in an instant that things can get a whole lot bloody worse, as a couple of thousand rounds of mixed ball and tracer all appear to be aimed exactly at him. He hits the dirt quicker than anything he has ever hit before and proceeds to dig himself a slit trench, like a demented gopher, with his hands, knees and chin. The noise is unbelievable. Nothing can live through this amount of firepower.
For the next four hours 42 Commando put the Jimpy SFs through their full repertoire. Firing on fixed lines, firing beaten zones, converging fires, flank firing and all guns letting rip just for the hell of it, (and the sheer sexiness).
Pvt Johns is now down about six inches. Never has one man been subjected to such firepower for so long. The noise is unending and terrifying. The rounds fly all around him and it just goes on and on.
At 0325 Hrs a message arrives at the ranges to cease firing. A para is missing from last night’s jump which had been well scattered. One para still missing, firing would have to cease until he was located. Capt Issacs is not too disappointed. Almost all the 40000 rounds had been fired, a most impressive and sexy night. 42 Commando stand and give a round of applause. It had been a long and loud night — but well worth it — very awe inspiring, very sexy they all agreed.
The silence was truly deafening. He couldn’t hear a bloody thing. Just getting light and a glance at his watch 0305 Hrs. He could not believe how long he had been there trapped under an unbelievable weight of firepower. Pvt Johns staggered to his feet and waved his arms.
On the firing line 42 Commando had just started to shovel up the brass, when somebody spotted the tiny dark figure down range. All who had them grabbed their binos. Unbelievable — there really was somebody out there!
There was of course an enquiry, nobody to blame, and thank god nobody injured. Pvt John did recover his hearing and his sanity eventually. He never ever recovered from the humiliation of 42 Commando’s reception as he staggered up to the firing line, and the Commando realised that they had had a little para trapped down range all night.
And of course the incident did absolutely nothing for Para I Commando relations. The Para’s accused the Commando’s of knowing he was there all the time. The Commando’s replied that if they knew he was there they certainly would not have missed him.
And Pvt Johns? He, of course, hates the Commando’s more than most of his mates. And every time he jumps, he now carries the Jimpy. The extra weight helps him to get to the ground a little quicker, but more importantly, next time he insists on having the chance to have a go back at the bastards
 
#5
Yes

High. Plenty of info on the army website, but basically your 2.4km run needs to be below 9.30 as a very basic start point.

Opinions vary. Some believe you can’t possibly do it without magic milkshakes, yet generations of Paras did perfectly well with a healthy balanced diet and lots of exercise. You can probably guess which camp I fall in to.

All covered dozens of times, or freely abailable on the army website.
Thanks for the heads up mate, think ill just stick to the good old fashioned way, wont be able to rely on supplements in the field!
 
#7
If you are a skinny lad you may wish to read this.

From a series of articles The Finest Army in the World

Lt Col Mike Morgan



As anybody will tell you the General Purpose Machine Gun is one helluva sexy weapon. It is known as the ‘Jimpy’ and is only surpassed in sexiness by its big sister — the 50 cal. But this is a story about the Jimpy, and the Jimpy in its sexiest guise — the GPMG SF. SF stands for ‘Sustained Fire’, and is a mod kit for the GPMG which puts it on a tripod, adds long range sights and a firing button. In this configuration the Jimpy is known as ‘Sex on Legs’.
Paras come in most shapes and sizes, although it is a very rare sight to see an overweight para. But they do come in a thin and wiry variety. Private Tim Johns was just such a variety. Short, tough and about eight stone in his Boots Combat High and helmet. He had been in 2 Para for long enough to know his way around, long enough to know what was ‘Aly’, and long enough not to have to take crap from anybody — except those few that he had to take crap from — like his platoon sergeant and the RSM — in fact anybody that outranked him by at least two grades — except ruperts of course. Tonight A Company, 2 Para is to make a night jump over Thetford training area.
42 Commando is also in the Thetford training area, setting up for a night shoot. This is to be a firepower demonstration and Captain John Issacs is the Range Officer. He has eight Jimpy SF kits set up on the firing line and 5000 rounds of mixed tracer and ball for each gun. Now a single Jimpy SF and 5000 rounds guarantees a couple of very sexy hours and will give a very impressive light and sound show. Eight Jimpy SEs is indeed a rare sight, and together they will certainly deliver an awesome display of sound and fury, as well as delivering one hell of a lot of rounds down range. The entire commando will be present to see this display. First rounds down range 2300 Hrs. Captain John Issacs is happy in his work this night.

Pvt Tim John’s C130 circles the training area, it is a bumpy ride. The wind is picking up, the drop may still be cancelled. Tim, like all the other Paras on board, just wished they would make their ******* minds up. Let’s just get off this thing one way or another, a couple of Paras have already puked and the atmosphere on board is becoming decidedly ‘interesting’. Inevitably more Paras will start to throw up in sympathy before much longer, and then the atmosphere will become ‘very interesting’.
Somebody, somewhere in the chain of command makes a decision, and the signal to ‘go’ is given. Thank god. Stand up, check kit, hook up, shuffle to the door. Final checks, door open, green light and out into the freezing night wind.
Now the para drop zone at Thetford is many miles from the Machine Gun ranges. Range use and deconfliction is one of the things the Army gets right nearly all of the time, and tonight they had got it right once again. The Paras would drop well clear of the ranges. However what they, (‘they’ being the range deconfliction staff), had not taken into account, was the law of aerodynamics, and how these laws would apply to a skinny para on a windy night.
Pvt Johns left the aircraft and was immediately aware that his chute had deployed —as his fall through space was violently halted. He looked up and checked his canopy. So far so good. The drop had been from 500 feet. Pitch black all around, but he would hit the ground in the next second or two. He braced for the landing. After several seconds had passed Tim had his first inkling that tonight could be a long one. The wind had certainly picked up, and his travel was definitely more sideways than downwards, and there was absolutely sweet **** all that he could do about it. All aircraft sounds had now died away. Several more seconds passed. Still no rendezvous with terra firma.
2255 Hrs. All is ready on the SF range. Ammo boxes open and on Captain Isaac’s orders, belts are laid into trays and top covers closed. ‘Ready!’, and each gun is cocked. The whole of 42 Commando is sitting in rows behind the gun line, they all lean forward. Should be a good night.
Pvt Johns is still floating over Thetford training area. He is just starting to get a little pissed off. Suddenly he hits the ground hard, knocks the wind out of him, the chute drags and bumps him over and through the long grass, then proceeds to drag him through a stream, a bog and various cowpats in various states of maturity. He finally releases the chute buckle and comes to a halt looking up at the stars. He is now soaking wet, covered in mud and worse and has no idea where he is. First out, move in the direction the aircraft came from. Last out, move in the direction the aircraft is going. Simple para rules for finding your mates in the dark. Trouble was he has no idea what direction the aircraft had come from, or gone to, and he certainly couldn’t hear the bloody thing. Probably back in Brize by now, with some lucky crab cleaning up para puke. He stands up and starts to gather in his chute. Couldn’t get much bloody worse.
Exactly 2300 Hrs. ‘Fire’ screams Capt Isaacs. Eight Jimpy SFs do their thing.
Pvt Tim Johns realises in an instant that things can get a whole lot bloody worse, as a couple of thousand rounds of mixed ball and tracer all appear to be aimed exactly at him. He hits the dirt quicker than anything he has ever hit before and proceeds to dig himself a slit trench, like a demented gopher, with his hands, knees and chin. The noise is unbelievable. Nothing can live through this amount of firepower.
For the next four hours 42 Commando put the Jimpy SFs through their full repertoire. Firing on fixed lines, firing beaten zones, converging fires, flank firing and all guns letting rip just for the hell of it, (and the sheer sexiness).
Pvt Johns is now down about six inches. Never has one man been subjected to such firepower for so long. The noise is unending and terrifying. The rounds fly all around him and it just goes on and on.
At 0325 Hrs a message arrives at the ranges to cease firing. A para is missing from last night’s jump which had been well scattered. One para still missing, firing would have to cease until he was located. Capt Issacs is not too disappointed. Almost all the 40000 rounds had been fired, a most impressive and sexy night. 42 Commando stand and give a round of applause. It had been a long and loud night — but well worth it — very awe inspiring, very sexy they all agreed.
The silence was truly deafening. He couldn’t hear a bloody thing. Just getting light and a glance at his watch 0305 Hrs. He could not believe how long he had been there trapped under an unbelievable weight of firepower. Pvt Johns staggered to his feet and waved his arms.
On the firing line 42 Commando had just started to shovel up the brass, when somebody spotted the tiny dark figure down range. All who had them grabbed their binos. Unbelievable — there really was somebody out there!
There was of course an enquiry, nobody to blame, and thank god nobody injured. Pvt John did recover his hearing and his sanity eventually. He never ever recovered from the humiliation of 42 Commando’s reception as he staggered up to the firing line, and the Commando realised that they had had a little para trapped down range all night.
And of course the incident did absolutely nothing for Para I Commando relations. The Para’s accused the Commando’s of knowing he was there all the time. The Commando’s replied that if they knew he was there they certainly would not have missed him.
And Pvt Johns? He, of course, hates the Commando’s more than most of his mates. And every time he jumps, he now carries the Jimpy. The extra weight helps him to get to the ground a little quicker, but more importantly, next time he insists on having the chance to have a go back at the bastards

Thats a quality read mate, will take note of that, GPMG Gunner tick!
 
#9
No mate I haven't, how would it work round what i'm doing currently as i'm an apprentice so i'm working 5 day's a week and them i'm in college 2 nights a week on top of that during term time?
It's in your spare time, not part time, if you've got time to go out on the piss, goto the pub etc than you have time for the reserves... and you get paid, your a winner either way
 
#10
It's in your spare time, not part time, if you've got time to go out on the piss, goto the pub etc than you have time for the reserves... and you get paid, your a winner either way
So whats the process then Chuggafugga, would I go on my weekends and then come back Sunday night ready for work Monday morning?
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
#12
So whats the process then Chuggafugga, would I go on my weekends and then come back Sunday night ready for work Monday morning?
Your training nights are fixed. If they clash with your college nights, it is a non starter. If they don’t, then great. Don’t expect to go back to work on Monday as fresh as a daisy though.
 
#14
Your training nights are fixed. If they clash with your college nights, it is a non starter. If they don’t, then great. Don’t expect to go back to work on Monday as fresh as a daisy though.
Do you happen to know what the nights are i'm currently studying Tues & Thursday night?
 
#18
Most TACs operate on Tues and Thurs night so reserves isn't for you
That sucks, so with TA out of the window, I need to set my sights on becoming a regular once i'm qualified, I have plenty of time nearly 2 years in fact as I will only finish in January 2020, what can I expect from training and how can I prepare myself mentally for the challenge?
 
#19
That sucks, so with TA out of the window, I need to set my sights on becoming a regular once i'm qualified, I have plenty of time nearly 2 years in fact as I will only finish in January 2020, what can I expect from training and how can I prepare myself mentally for the challenge?
It's covered in other threads so best just go peruse the board and use the search function
 
#20
Do you happen to know what the nights are i'm currently studying Tues & Thursday night?
There’s a sticky on 4 Para recruitment. You could also call or email them:
https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/4-para-recruitment.235131/
Bn HQ: 01904 664566
Face ache: 4th Battalion The Parachute Regiment - 4 PARA
Email: mailto:4para-ccoy-recruiter@mod.uk
(which may have changed to mailto:4para-ccoy-recruiter@mod.gov.uk if they have MoDNet’d.
Or simply tag @4PARAREG
 

Similar threads

Top