Joining Reserves as an Officer - best options for the quadrilingual?

Hello!

I'm thinking about joining Army Reserves as an Officer, but I'm not sure where I would be able to utilise my skills for the greatest benefit of the Army.

I'm 28 y.o, got a MSc degree in Computer Science, working full time as a junior manager for a multinational corporation and I know 4 foreign languages:
  • - Russian (native)
  • - Ukrainian (native)
  • - Polish (native)
  • - German (intermediate)
I've been living in the UK since 2012, finished here my BA and MSc degrees. At the end of 2019 I have obtained British citizenship. I also have a Polish passport.

I was thinking about joining Intelligence Corps as I would be able to use my linguistic skills there to be useful. Probably Russian in particular. What do you reckon?
 
My advice is to find out what units are near you first. Its another call on your time and you will be occupied in becoming an Officer (if you do go down the Officer route) before you can use your skills.
 
There might be a PQO route option for you. As an aside, you might need to renounce your Polish citizenship in order to obtain the requisite security clearance for some of the posts where you might most usefully be employed. Your first task is to find out what is available to and how far you might be prepared to travel to attend training. Whatever you decide, good luck!
 
You might also want to approach the AGC Pool of Linguists, part of its Central Reserve Headquarters based in Worthy Down.

As a specialist unit they have a relatively low time commitment, and have commissioned linguists as PQOs ( Professionally Qualified Officers ) in the past - including one with an identical language skillset to yours.
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
I'm going to trot out my usual question: why do you want to be an officer?

If it's for status and a perceived better 'tick' on the CV, then, personally, I'd rather you didn't. The officer's job, fundamentally, is to command soldiers and if that's not what you want to do, at least some of the time, consider something else for your leisure pursuit.

You might consider enlisting in the Reserve as a soldier, just to see whether or not the military thing is all you hope for - and bearing in mind that there's a long, long tradition of people in high-powered jobs taking relatively lowly posts in the former TA, now Army Reserve - and thoroughly enjoying them.

I should also bear in mind that, if your original citizenship is Russian, or even Ukrainian, there might be some issues in obtaining a security clearance high enough to allow enlistment into the Intelligence Corps - or even some other, more technical units. Best talk to the unit directly to see what the story is.

Hello!

I'm thinking about joining Army Reserves as an Officer, but I'm not sure where I would be able to utilise my skills for the greatest benefit of the Army.

I'm 28 y.o, got a MSc degree in Computer Science, working full time as a junior manager for a multinational corporation and I know 4 foreign languages:
  • - Russian (native)
  • - Ukrainian (native)
  • - Polish (native)
  • - German (intermediate)
I've been living in the UK since 2012, finished here my BA and MSc degrees. At the end of 2019 I have obtained British citizenship. I also have a Polish passport.

I was thinking about joining Intelligence Corps as I would be able to use my linguistic skills there to be useful. Probably Russian in particular. What do you reckon?
 
There are couple reasons why I want to join army as an officer. And none of them involves tick in my CV (between you and me, in many instances being a member of the Army might be a disadvantage, as you are not as flexible as the soulless corporation would like you to be... same as with the children).

I have completed BA and MSc in Languages, Management and IT (MSc had emphasis on management in the IT environment). I'm also a member of Chartered Management Institute and I'm very interested in further developing my skills and knowledge in this area, to become a good manager. At least according to the prospectus, joining Army as an officer would allow me to further develop my managerial potential (if there is any), as well as have an ability to lead team of people, which is a very important skill I need to possess for future, more serious roles - at the moment no one in the corporate world would allow me to lead even a one-man team (and many, many roles I aim for require experience in leading team of ~5 people).

Secondly, I have read an article that there are 6 or 7 fluent Russian speakers across whole Army. And only 3(?) Ukrainian ones. Therefore, it is in my interest to support my new homeland if I'm able to, to level the playing field against our adversaries. I guess you could call it patriotism.

And with the article about Russians paying taliban to kill US and British troops, or Russian Navy increasing it's activity in the English Channel during the covid outbreak, I think Army could use another Russian native speaker. Intelligence was just my first idea, AGC seems like a really interesting choice as well.

As for citizenship, technically I still have Ukrainian one, but due to the fact that I have both Polish and British passports, I won't be able to renew my Ukrainian passport (Ukraine doesn't allow dual nationality). Therefore I hope that this won't be a problem...

At the same time, I have now checked that for joining Intelligence Corps there is a need to pass the Developed Vetting, which in most cases require 10 years residence in the UK - I have 7,5 years so far, so this might be a serious problem :(
I will definitely contact the unit directly, there is one Intelligence detachment close to where I live.

Thank you!

I'm going to trot out my usual question: why do you want to be an officer?

If it's for status and a perceived better 'tick' on the CV, then, personally, I'd rather you didn't. The officer's job, fundamentally, is to command soldiers and if that's not what you want to do, at least some of the time, consider something else for your leisure pursuit.

You might consider enlisting in the Reserve as a soldier, just to see whether or not the military thing is all you hope for - and bearing in mind that there's a long, long tradition of people in high-powered jobs taking relatively lowly posts in the former TA, now Army Reserve - and thoroughly enjoying them.

I should also bear in mind that, if your original citizenship is Russian, or even Ukrainian, there might be some issues in obtaining a security clearance high enough to allow enlistment into the Intelligence Corps - or even some other, more technical units. Best talk to the unit directly to see what the story is.
 
Possessing the foreign passports is less of a problem than exercising those citizenships. If you do that,(for example renewing any of them, traveling on them, voting in those countries, living or working there), then inherently you demonstrate a degree of allegiance to those countries == no DV (or some difficult to answer questions at the very least).

Best of luck.
 
There are couple reasons why I want to join army as an officer. And none of them involves tick in my CV (between you and me, in many instances being a member of the Army might be a disadvantage, as you are not as flexible as the soulless corporation would like you to be... same as with the children).

I have completed BA and MSc in Languages, Management and IT (MSc had emphasis on management in the IT environment). I'm also a member of Chartered Management Institute and I'm very interested in further developing my skills and knowledge in this area, to become a good manager. At least according to the prospectus, joining Army as an officer would allow me to further develop my managerial potential (if there is any), as well as have an ability to lead team of people, which is a very important skill I need to possess for future, more serious roles - at the moment no one in the corporate world would allow me to lead even a one-man team (and many, many roles I aim for require experience in leading team of ~5 people).

Secondly, I have read an article that there are 6 or 7 fluent Russian speakers across whole Army. And only 3(?) Ukrainian ones. Therefore, it is in my interest to support my new homeland if I'm able to, to level the playing field against our adversaries. I guess you could call it patriotism.

And with the article about Russians paying taliban to kill US and British troops, or Russian Navy increasing it's activity in the English Channel during the covid outbreak, I think Army could use another Russian native speaker. Intelligence was just my first idea, AGC seems like a really interesting choice as well.

As for citizenship, technically I still have Ukrainian one, but due to the fact that I have both Polish and British passports, I won't be able to renew my Ukrainian passport (Ukraine doesn't allow dual nationality). Therefore I hope that this won't be a problem...

At the same time, I have now checked that for joining Intelligence Corps there is a need to pass the Developed Vetting, which in most cases require 10 years residence in the UK - I have 7,5 years so far, so this might be a serious problem :(
I will definitely contact the unit directly, there is one Intelligence detachment close to where I live.

Thank you!
Good for you (and hopefully us).
Good luck.
 
Some thoughts:

1. Sadly the Pool of Linguists is all but dead, and, in anticipation of its final and long-flagged demise, is not recruiting. A pity, as they would have found a use for the languages you offer.

2. Your language skill set should be of interest to Defence as a whole. The reserve elements of the RN and RAF may also be interested. You may wish to do some research into these.

3. You will need to be sure that you meet the nationality and residency requirements. These are unlikely to be negotiable.

4. You might consider 77 Brigade (and specifically Defence Cultural Specialist Unit: DCSU) if "cultural and linguistic advice" is your thing. I tried to add a link but arrse won't let me for some reason. But easily googled.

5. Defence needs linguistic capability and is short of it. Your languages, and region of origin, are likely to be of interest for all the obvious reasons.

6. You may however need to be persistent! Best of luck.
 
There are couple reasons why I want to join army as an officer. And none of them involves tick in my CV
...
joining Army as an officer would allow me to further develop my managerial potential (if there is any), as well as have an ability to lead team of people, which is a very important skill I need to possess for future, more serious roles - at the moment no one in the corporate world would allow me to lead even a one-man team (and many, many roles I aim for require experience in leading team of ~5 people).
...
 

Sgt_Steiner

Old-Salt
We had a Ukranian Signaller in 1 (UK) ADSR in around 2012. IIRC he'd moved to UK as a child. Great bloke.
 

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