Joining as a soldier and going on to be an officer due to 2 year deferment at AOSB Briefing

MR_R_SOLE

Old-Salt
Thank you (and everyone else) for your response.

My results said, based on my 2 minute speech, that I needed more social development for appearing 'somewhat nervous'. Not terribly surprising given I've been stuck inside for the better part of a year.

I was thinking of a role with ceremonial duties to help gain a bit more confidence in 'group situations' as well as the team work behind the scenes.



That does sound good though the big debt that comes with it sounds less fantastic. Beyond UOTC though I don't really see what I'd be doing it for.

Don't joint the Household Division, you will not commission from the ranks.
Go and see the world. Or try PCSO or some shit. Don't join the ranks wanting to commission. If the blokes find out your be ridiculed and especially in the Household Division if your face fit you won't get a commission and they hate seeing Gmen/Troopers leave for a different branch of the Army ( stand fast Guards Para, PF, SF or AAC).
 
Contrary to what almost everyone else has said here already I have a different point of view. Joining the Army and doing two years as a Regular Soldier would most definitely give you a full perspective of what the Army is like from a 'Toms' eye view.

This can only stand you in good stead in your future career as an officer, you will have experience life in the Army, and stand head and shoulders above the other officer cadets at Sandhurst.

In Royal Signals basic training we had two Potential Officers in our Troop. They worked alongside the Tp Sgt and Tp Cpls but they also did everything we did.

So many options available to you, but it is your call. Good luck.
 

Oyibo

LE
Hello all!

As a bit of background, I'm 19 years old and have got the required amount of ALIS and UCAS points from my GCSEs and A Levels respectively to become an officer.

It has been a month or so since I had my AOSB Briefing, after which I got a CAT 2 and a 2 year deferment.

A couple days later I get a call from a recruitment guy at Westbury, specialising in those who get big deferments and those who fail Briefing.

He tells me that I can join the army as a soldier (don't need to do soldier selection as my AOSB Briefing counts as soldier selection) and after 2 - 3 years I can take this course called PODCs (Potential Officer Development Course), which if I pass will get me a reserve seat for Sandhurst.

However, I've been reading through ARRSE and I've been given some cause for concern, particularly after reading a thread called 'Wannabe Officer'.

So to my question. Is joining the army as a regular soldier to plug the gap of my two year deferment a good idea? Or is it a bureaucratic nightmare that I'm unwittingly walking right into?
Furthermore, do certain regiments put more people forward to officer training than others (or are more likely to)? Are some less likely to do so? Are there any statistics on this?

Any and all information is much appreciated. Thank you!

A long time ago but... I didn't pass my first RCB (the equivalent of AOSB) when I was a soldier. RCB wrote to my CO recommending that I went on PODC, which I duly did.

I got a very good pass on the second RCB and sat an extra, academic, test at the board for to see whether I was suitable for a Reg C (I only had O' Levels at the time). I passed that test and I was qualified academically for a Reg C as a result.

So yes, I consider PODC well worth doing. However, as alluded to by other posters, Household Division is probably not the best way to go through the process or be accepted if commissioned back into the Division: One excellent guy on my RMAS intake who had been a Guardsman was commissioned back into the Guards. I met him a couple of years after being commissioned and he was was thoroughly miserable and looking for a transfer to the Parachute Regiment.

Just as an aside, my first CO in 2 PARA hated people being commissioned from the ranks and was effectively blocking any applications. So although I had been recommended to attend RMAS, I didn't do my first RCB until 1.5 years later when a new CO took over (and an excellent OC as well who really helped). I dare say that kind of attitude from COs is less common nowadays, but I just thought I'd give you a heads-up.
 

halloumikid

Old-Salt
The 227, the CO’s report is now only required after Briefing. There is now much less ability for the CoC to block a soldier’s initial application for a commission. This is designed to stop the soldier’s CO / OC from stymying applications, mostly on the grounds that, “I want to see Tpr X for 6 months before I support his application’ nonsense.

Halloumikid
 

Oyibo

LE
The 227, the CO’s report is now only required after Briefing. There is now much less ability for the CoC to block a soldier’s initial application for a commission. This is designed to stop the soldier’s CO / OC from stymying applications, mostly on the grounds that, “I want to see Tpr X for 6 months before I support his application’ nonsense.

Halloumikid

That's good to hear. I'm not sure by which means my first CO blocked things - I don't even know if he actually did, but that's what a couple of other Soldier/POs told me - but any PO at the time waited years before going to RCB. Some just gave up.

Apologies to the OP for the slight thread derailment, but in my day the process for a soldier was:

1. Unit selection board (interview with Regt Offrs led by the Adjt)
2. Pre RCB (similar to RCB but run at Depot PARA)
3. RCB

I sat 3 Unit Selection Boards, the first in Depot PARA , the second in 2 PARA, and the last which was with Cedric Delves who was 5AB Commander at the time. I passed them all. I sat one Pre-RCB (pass).

Difficult to say with any certainty why the delays happened, but it took a change of CO to get things moving.
 
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