Joining as a pilot

mc2016

Crow
I know its probably not the best place to post this so feel free to move it. I was just wondering whether the fleet air arm have a rule against asthma other than being 4 years clear, both the army and the raf say that a history of asthma tends to be a bar from pilot/aircrew training but i haven't seen anything about the navy. Do they have the same rule in place? thanks in advance for any replies
 
Regrettably, asthma is a bar to all aircrew service in all 3 services, not least as the same people set the standards and conduct the medicals.

However, you would be able to join the RAF as an RPAS(P).

Regards,
MM
 
I thought that a history of asthma was a bar to all aircrew roles in the Raf it said something along the lines of "a history of asthma will act from flying branches" or something like that. Thanks though :)
Nope. You're allowed asthma for RPAS(P) because your only 'real' flying is a purpose designed elementary flying syllabus of around 60 hrs in the new Grob Prefect.

This emphasizes Instrument Flying and general airmanship. You then progress onto the USAF Reaper Formal Training Unit or, in due course, the equivalent RAF Protector course, much of which is done on synthetics.

Regards,
MM
 

Sixty

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Why is that, M_M? If the asthma is gone then what's the concern?
It's all based on decades of medical stats that it can reoccur. Asthma is not exactly compatible to flying due to pressure, oxygen, humidity and temperature differences as well as the way your body works at altitude. As symptoms may return when an individual is subjected to the physiological effects of flying, the docs need to see a fair period clear of the issue before someone can be considered for aircrew.

Ultimately, we're not exactly short of applicants so why take the risk?

Regards,
MM
 

Sixty

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
It's all based on decades of medical stats that it can reoccur. Asthma is not exactly compatible to flying due to pressure, oxygen, humidity and temperature differences as well as the way your body works at altitude. As symptoms may return when an individual is subjected to the physiological effects of flying, the docs need to see a fair period clear of the issue before someone can be considered for aircrew.

Ultimately, we're not exactly short of applicants so why take the risk?

Regards,
MM
Understood and makes sense. Thanks for the reply.
 

mc2016

Crow
Thanks mm you have made my day, now I've got to hope my asthma does clear up by the time I'm 18! Don't worry though I do have back up plans in place of i can't join the military. Thanks for the support guys :)
 
Thanks mm you have made my day, now I've got to hope my asthma does clear up by the time I'm 18! Don't worry though I do have back up plans in place of i can't join the military. Thanks for the support guys :)
It's common that such ailments clear up in teenage years so good luck!

Regards,
MM
 
As MM states, any history of asthma is unfortunately a bar to entry at the initial aviation medical examination conducted via RAF Cranwell for Naval Service aircrew.
 
It's common that such ailments clear up in teenage years so good luck!

Regards,
MM
It is also that a heavy dose of anti inflammatories can cause symptoms when older.
 

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