John H Haynes OBE

The museum is fantastic and a must for anyone with the remotest interest in the social history of cars.

I would highly recommend anyone in the area to drop in if they have the time, he has created a suitable legacy to tho motor vehicle industry.
 
No tears from this C/S.

Have you ever tried using one of those manuals to actually repair a car? :razz:

http://messybeast.com/dragonqueen/real-haynes.htm

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I think the early ones were better - more detailed... They got a bit lazy in the 90's and upwards
What @greyfergie said. I had one for every car I owned in the 70s, 80s, and 90s. But then I bought one for my '99 Focus (the book, not the car) which was absolute rubbish, and it seems from then on they were almost useless. I suspect the revered John H Haynes had handed over the reins to lesser beings.
 
I found the line drawings of the early books easier to follow than 'photo's from the later stuff.
 

Pisseduppardre

Old-Salt
What @greyfergie said. I had one for every car I owned in the 70s, 80s, and 90s. But then I bought one for my '99 Focus (the book, not the car) which was absolute rubbish, and it seems from then on they were almost useless. I suspect the revered John H Haynes had handed over the reins to lesser beings.
I think the problem was there was less you could do with modern cars. I found them very useful in my days of amateur and professional spannering, particularly the wiring diagrams and tech data.
 
Where’s the F1 connection? Haynes built an Austin 7 special whilst at school, photographed and described how he did it and sold a few hundred copies. Mid to late 50s, long after Chapman et al had kicked on towards F1. He didn’t design it; he copied what others had done and recorded it. I’ve never seen an F1 connection and would be interested to see one.

Haynes started his publishing business whilst doing National Service in the RAF. He and a mate stripped an Frogeye and photographed what they did.

Haynes was a publisher not an engineer. Great man though.
 
D

Deleted 60082

Guest
I liked the photographs. They were seriously middle class. There would be a photograph purportedly showing brake shoe replacement but also showing a highly polished brogue and neatly pressed trouser leg with turn up. Or a white double cuff and tweed suited hand pointing at an SU HD 6 carburettor. And the chaps always wore a tie, tightly knotted.
 
The line drawings in the old manuals were fantastic; there was one of a gentleman in his shed, with the cylinder of his BSA clamped in a vice, deglazing the bore of said cylinder, in his Saturday best, (shirt, tie, workman's apron, pipe)...and a jaunty caption under the picture, suggesting that it would be reassembled in time for tea and a test run around the village....
 

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