Job offer in the USA

#1
In this current climate I have been very lucky to have been offered a job in the USA and I am seriously considering such a proposal. This is due to the fact that every other day that One Eyed "See You Next Tuesday" seems to be sending our beloved country further and further into the mire. Having done a bit of research about relocating its still as clear as a muddy puddle.

Therefore I was wondering if any of you could offer me some practical tips and hints on relocating and what the pitfalls and perils might be.
 
#3
STABALTERN69 said:
In this current climate I have been very lucky to have been offered a job in the USA and I am seriously considering such a proposal. This is due to the fact that every other day that One Eyed "See You Next Tuesday" seems to be sending our beloved country further and further into the mire. Having done a bit of research about relocating its still as clear as a muddy puddle.

Therefore I was wondering if any of you could offer me some practical tips and hints on relocating and what the pitfalls and perils might be.
One of the guys I work with is from India. He had a heck of a time with the visa from what I understand. The workplace needs to be the one to initiate it and often they don't want to do the paperwork until after your 90 day probation (talk about major motivation). I would suggest focus on ensuring that they will immediately put in the paperwork.
 
#4
Many thanks for that, I'm very lucky to have someone in the organisation who is doing all the Greencard stuff for me and is keen to get me out there asap, so in all honesty I hope that this should not be a drama. However many thanks for the tip and I will impress this upon them.
 
#5
ghost_us said:
I would suggest focus on ensuring that they will immediately put in the paperwork.
Good suggestion - get it in writing from them that they will be your visa sponsor, pending satistactory trial period, and that they'll be willing to provide you with the necessary HR support for you to obtain a visa once you've passed it.

The immigration lawyer would probably be on your dime - and I highly recommend you get one - but depending on where you're going, they will be used to handling these things and it should require a minimum of drama if you get everything set up at the outset.

What part of the U.S., can I ask, would you be in? Some areas have bigger British expat populations than others (my city had a huge one) so your resources may vary.

Thus far, my only tip is: while you will probably be leaving the mosques behind, don't move onto to a block with a Pentecostal church. Their calls to prayer are about as frequent and the parking situation is worse. :D
 
#6
Blimey sounds a trifle intense, but hey-ho nothing ventured nothing gained, I'm looking to base myself in and around St Louis and move the missus over once i have settled down.

Am I right in deducing that I will have many visa obstacles to encounter due to the fact that I am British or do different countries have different requirements of entry.
 
#7
I would echo the 'warnings' about the bureaucratic FUBAR that immigration can be... both from previously working for H.M Imm' in the UK, and having to be 'processed' for my time living in the US. (Spent 4-5 years outside Seattle - amazing area).

How long would you be going for?

And which part of the US?
 
#9
STABALTERN69 said:
Blimey sounds a trifle intense, but hey-ho nothing ventured nothing gained, I'm looking to base myself in and around St Louis and move the missus over once i have settled down.

Am I right in deducing that I will have many visa obstacles to encounter due to the fact that I am British or do different countries have different requirements of entry.
Well in practice, regardless of what is said/written, you will probably have an easier ride being British than being 'Winston Kodogo' from Ghana (thanks to 'Not The Nine O'Clock News' for the Kodogo reference).

Not been to St. Louis though did spent a few months further 'up stream' around Quad Cities on the Illinois/Iowa border.

In reality it shouldn't be too much of an upheaval... get letters of reference from your bank, credit cards etc - anything that will assist in getting access to financial services in the US.
In fact, initially, keep UK issued card and account open so you can use them in the interim.

The easiest way I found to start establishing a 'good credit report' in the US was to buy a brand new car..... put a chunk down on an initial payment and finance through the dealer. They should be biting your hand off to sell you a car and finance at this point in time...

Health/Dental insurance is a huge consideration in the US.... if being posted abroad for your company chances are that you will have it included in your package... if not it can be very large expense, especially once family/kids are added.
 
#10
Fantastic advice there on the whole banking issue, I am actually thinking that I might convert my current account to an off shore account so while I am changing over I am not being penalised to heavily.
 
#11
There are a variety of Imm' & Visa forums....

Here's a couple... most deal with spousal/fiancee ones and can be a bit vomit inducingly syrupy...

http://www.expatforum.com

http://www.immigrationboards.com


Had a friend who has just moved over to Pennsylvania (finally) to join his wife.... he swore by

http://visajourney.com

but it may only be pertinent to family/marriage visa's... but may still have useful 'expat' info.
 
#13
Some good answers appeared whilst I was compiling mine but I'll throw them into the fray anyway.

Having done the same thing I would say go for it! It was a fantastic experience both for myself and the family (only just got back after being "Credit Crunched!" - but more on that below).

So as I ain't got a lot of time as it's POETS, sort of, here are a few lines in no particular order as to importance or sequence.

* Go with some financial resources behind you - doesn't have to be a lot but a few Thou will help

* make sure that both you and your employer understand as to what kind of relocation package is on offer. From who pays for the Visa ( Them, You or You and then claim back) to will the flights have a return portion to moving furniture. Also will they be providing you with a car or not?, accommodation or temp accommodation until you can get an Apartment? etc etc.

* Understand what medical Benefits are on offer, will they cover your family or will that portion come out of your wage (and before tax or after).

* Check the rate they are offering against living costs in the State the job is in, don't let them take advantage of you not knowing that California is so much more expensive to live in than Texas).

* If you just end up with flights and Visa aim to get yourself a car and apartment as quick as you can - like within the week! Car hire isn't that cheap especially when you require insurance and cheap long stay motels are just goddam awful and regularly in the badder part of town. ( worst one I had was in Louisiana right next to the train crossing and off the end of a runway that just happened to have a whole Wing of B-52's - didn't sleep for that week!)

* No matter what the locals tell you about getting down to apply for your Social Security Number wait at least 10 days as it takes Immigration/DHS that long to get your entry into the country on the SS system.
* Go to the SS Office Early in the morning - it is not a pleasant place and the Line up gets big v quickly.
* If you get your own car get your State Driving License as soon as you get your SS number - this has 2 main benefits. The license is a De Facto state ID card and is used in all aspects of daily life ( ID check for liquor sales to returning shoddy goods to K-Mart) and it will also bring down your car insurance premiums.

* Start straight away to work on your Credit Rating, without one you will find it hard to get anything on credit ( Inc a mobile phone contract ) without paying deposits ( that's why you need some financial resources!).

* start to build up an "escape fund" - if it all goes Pete Tong a little bit of a financial buffer will help you stay over there while you sort it out, or even pack up and leave.

* Enjoy it! Do a road trip and see some of the country. We really did and fully plan to return.


Where was the offer btw?
 
#14
Yet again things that I hadn't even considered with regard to Social Security and Driving Licenses etc. I genuinely believe that this is a "golden ticket" opportunity and I don't want to miss out.
 
#18
Buy it when you get there, it won't work.

Different voltages - different system for the telly. Be diligent when looking for aq DVD player, make sure it can play region 2 (Europe) or 0 ("Worldwide), as opposed to 1 (USA).
 
#19
STABALTERN69 said:
In addition is it worth bringing over things like my television and other electricals or am I better off buying it all when or if I get out there?
It's not clear if you have rugrats to keep entertained. One of my colleagues fho moved across the pond with his (young) kids brought a small all in one TV / DVD player across with him and a US/UK conversion transformer so his kids could watch all their DVD's.

Footpad's advice is great. I would also add keep a UK bank account if you can as you don't want to loose any UK credit ratings etc you have built up should you ever return.

I have been told that American Express and HSBC will transfer your credit rating with them with you across the pond if you have existing accounts with them. This was before the credit crunch though.

You can also get a secured credit cardwhere you put down X as a deposit and your credit limit on your card is then X. You can then cancel the card and get your monay back once you have a credit rating, and this type of card will help with that - I did this when I first moved across many years ago.
 
#20
Silly question but I am quite keen on the sound of a secured Credit Card, do most American Banks do this or is there a specific bank I need to go to? In addition will my military service count for any perks or privileges? I noticed there are organisations like the Navy Credit Union who give preferential rates to ex US personnel. Could I qualify?
 

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