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Jewish names matter

RedDinger

Old-Salt
Germany to wipe Nazi traces from phonetic alphabet

their use has since continued with most Germans unaware of their anti-Semitic origin

90 years later, when almost no-one remembers or probably cares, 1 man is offended.

To be clear here before the abuse starts, I am not anti-semitic. I am commenting on how some people will search tirelessly to find something to offend them.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
I could understand the effort put into this if it was 'H for holocaust' and B for Belsen etc

however I don't care much as I'm not Jewish, or German.
I'm also unlikely to use the German phonetic alphabet
 
This makes no sense to me. If the names of the letters had been changed to "Adolf", "Goering", "Dachau" etc, then of course that would be offensive. They were changed to other names, which as far as I am aware, remain uncontroversial.

It's like NATO changing Z from Zulu to Zebra, because Zulu might offend some, and then 80 years later, someone says "Zebra is offensive, because it was changed from Zulu - let's make it "Zimbabwe".
 
This makes no sense to me. If the names of the letters had been changed to "Adolf", "Goering", "Dachau" etc, then of course that would be offensive. They were changed to other names, which as far as I am aware, remain uncontroversial.

It's like NATO changing Z from Zulu to Zebra, because Zulu might offend some, and then 80 years later, someone says "Zebra is offensive, because it was changed from Zulu - let's make it "Zimbabwe".
But is Zebra pronounced US or UK way (Zee-bra or Zeb-ra)?
 
But is Zebra pronounced US or UK way (Zee-bra or Zeb-ra)?

That would be irrelevant, there would still no confusion as to what was meant, which is the point of the phonetic alphabet.

Just like today, there will be some mincing pooftahs that say "Pah-Par" for P, as opposed to "Pah-Pah". It still doesn't matter, what is meant is understood either way.
 
This makes no sense to me. If the names of the letters had been changed to "Adolf", "Goering", "Dachau" etc, then of course that would be offensive. They were changed to other names, which as far as I am aware, remain uncontroversial.

It's like NATO changing Z from Zulu to Zebra, because Zulu might offend some, and then 80 years later, someone says "Zebra is offensive, because it was changed from Zulu - let's make it "Zimbabwe".
Or Zeppelin...
 

Chef

LE
As time goes on and fewer real causes for offence are to be found, the permanently shocked must dig deeper and deeper to find things that they can demand be changed. Thus the whole equality/victimhood industry keeps rolling along while suckling off the public purse and gathering honours on the way, OBEs and the odd peerage spring to mind.

The disadvantages are that you have to tell people what it is that they should be offended at and why they should feel guilty and it must change. Thereby annoying a lot of people who rub along quite happily with their neighbours but are now told that one party is being oppressed and the other party is the oppressor.

Also in the rush to find ever more tenuous reasons to abuse people and things for their past mistakes are made:


From the article:

'In a statement to the Times, Carol Hughes welcomed the “full apology” for “highly misleading comments … attempting to link the poet somehow with tenuous allegations of involvement in slavery by someone alleged to be a very distant ancestor who was born in the time of Shakespeare”. She also noted the library’s “acknowledgment of the distress caused by comments on the library’s website that should not have been made, and its assurance that these comments will not be repeated”.

Bate called the inclusion of Hughes “an error on so many levels - not only the tenuous, centuries-old connection, but also the fact that Nicholas Ferrar wrote a pamphlet attacking slavery even before the British slave trade had begun.'

As for the phonetic alphabet? I would imagine most people's view is 'Meh'.
 
I had always thought the boxhead phonetic alphabet used:
A: Achtung

R: Raus

S: Spitfeur
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
To be pedantic, the names are not anti-Semitic, it was the revision of the alphabet that was.

So Dora is not anti-Semitic, the act of removing David was anti-Semitic.

To remove Dora will therefore be anti-Gentile.
 
When they say "..many English speakers also use terms like "D for Dennis, S for Sugar" on the phone" they mean people who don't actually know the phonetic alphabet.
 
There's a lot of scope here for an extremely offensive phonetic alphabet as a replacement, but I'm being nice tonight.
A= ass
B= big ass
C= Christ, look at that ass!
D= Did you see that .......

and so on. Within NATO, which I speak daily without thinking, I now see a future struggle with Alpha alone, unnecessarily implying superiority over inferiors, it's just so not needed in 2020. By the time I get to Zulu, those poor disenfranchised people, I'm worn out.
 
When they say "..many English speakers also use terms like "D for Dennis, S for Sugar" on the phone" they mean people who don't actually know the phonetic alphabet.
As per the telephone call to my bank several months ago. Lad on the phone was struggling with the call. I suggested using the phonetic alphabet to help things along after a long pause he came up with "A for apple, B for banana" etc etc.
Having spent so long waiting to talk to a human I played along.
 
This change does raise the spectre of have a more diverse and inclusive phonetic alphabet in Britain.

Here's a starter:

A - Africa - plundered by evil British colonialists.
B - Buggery - banned by an oppressive Patrichal society until 1967
C - Coalminers - deprived of an early death through silicosis or mine collapse by that evil hag Thatcher.
D - Dikes - Who fought for the right to have purple hair.

etc...
 

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