Jebel Akhdar Battlefield Tour

Discussion in 'Old & Bold' started by exXIX, Oct 8, 2012.

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  1. Chaps, I am planning on taking the family on a short tour and camping trip to the Jebel Akhdar (the Oman one not Libya) in a couple of weeks. I've googled, but I'm wondering if anyone might have some battlefield tour notes, grids, etc etc?
     
  2. I was on exercise there in the early 90's and it is one of the best places I have been to train. I absolutely loved the Jebel Akhdar and will go back at some point with my boys. I just had a look in my MFO box that I keep old maps in, and I must have given the Oman ones away, I would have sent it to you otherwise.

    For a Civvie guide we always buy Berlitz guide books. Got one recently for Morrocco and it was pretty good.
     
  3. really enjoyed visiting Oman on Saif Sareea. Would love to go back to the Oman with the family. is an ARSSE tour in order?
     
  4. There's a guy doing tours but they seem a tad expensive at £1320 not including international flights.

    Funny fing; I finished reading the USMC report on the Oman conflict not an hour ago.
     
  5. I'll check my back copies of the Sultans Armed Forces Association journals when I get home - there might be something.
     
  6. These pages are from the Sultan's Armed Forces Association magazine. One page to follow.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. ... and here it is. Sorry the first lot weren't in the right order. It's a dark art, this scanning game!
     

    Attached Files:

  8. The scanned document refers to the RAF, but the Fleet Air Arm was also very active.

    In the early '80s, thanks to my being one of the two "liquor peddlers" in Oman, I and my family were amongst the first civilians allowed up to Saiq and on the way we passed the remains of a Gnat(?) which had crashed into the Jebel. The pilot had been killed and the locals buried him at the side of the track with a cross painted on the concrete cover.

    We had a marvellous time there courtesy of, I think his name was Bentall Warner(?), who commanded the small garrison. My children had a great time collecting, and making bandoliers from, expended cartridges and visiting the Saiq Cavalry - donkeys and mules.

    If I recall correctly, Birqat al Mauz is at the bottom of the track to Saiq and there were the remains of a very fine Bait which had been blasted by the RAF/FAA during the war.

    The views from the top were seriously beautiful and it was marvellous to see the water in the falaj flowing down the mountain and irrigating the crops.

    Very happy days.
     
  9. Totally unrelated but if/when you go down there I thoroughly recommend nipping in to Salalah and there's a kebab type restaurant called the golden spoon if I remember rightly that does excellent fresh mango smoothies perfect for taking the edge off a hangover then nip down the road to (and unfortunately it's name escapes me) the ex-pat type club now next door to the new royal yacht club about ten minutes past the Hilton, they do a lovely steak and have decent beer on tap, I'm a proud member of their steak challenge victors club.
     
  10. Great read - thanks for posting

    (A few weeks ago I had the privilege of attending an 86th birthday party for one of the last surviving squadron soldiers. Completely enthralling chap with some remarkable friends)