Japan post WW2

Erinon

Old-Salt
I'm looking for a book that covers Japans recovery for the period from about 1945-1970ish. I tried a book on MacArthur but gave up as it was a terrible read.(cant remember its full title)

Any suggestions?
 
I can highly recommend "The Time of Fallen Blossoms" by the Australian soldier and author Allan Clifton about his experiences in immediate post-war Japan as part of the occupation Forces.

A very personal account, a quick read, controversial in some of what he describes but has the whiff of truth about it.

Time of Fallen Blossoms
 
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I'm looking for a book that covers Japans recovery for the period from about 1945-1970ish. I tried a book on MacArthur but gave up as it was a terrible read.(cant remember its full title)

Any suggestions?
Most of my books don't go up to 1970 but I found the following books on that period especially useful;
1964 Inventing Japan 1853- Ian Buruma
Ways of Forgetting, Ways of Forgetting -John W. Dower
Memoirs of Japan 1946 Bernard T Smith

Another one is Dower's Embracing Defeat

One MacArthur book I found interesting was Supreme Commander - MacArthur's Triumph in Japan by Seymour Morris but that might be the one you are referring to.

Happy reading!
 

Erinon

Old-Salt
Thanks All,

I'll have a look at those suggestions. the rebirth of japan post ww2 has long been a gap in my 20th centruy history I now have to scratch..
 

llech

LE

This chap is well worth a listen to, he's an avid historian about the lesser known aspects of history.
 
Thanks All,

I'll have a look at those suggestions. the rebirth of japan post ww2 has long been a gap in my 20th centruy history I now have to scratch..
It's an interesting period to study; actually delving into the history of Japan at that time dispels many commonly held beliefs. Also, I think it's fair to say that Japan's post-war progression is both because of,
and in spite of, MacArthur's tenure.

Another book that I have dug out and which I would recommend is;
'Travels in Atomic Sunshine' by Robin Gerster

It's basically a history of the Australian contingent of the British Commonwealth Occupation Force; their area covered a large area of western Japan, centred on Hiroshima and Kure.

It's both an easy read in the sense that it's less drier, being based a lot on anecdotes from the former members of BCOF and their families, than some histories of the period but also at times, an uneasy read.

I learned, for example that it was only in 1952 that Australia, ostensibly because of it’s ‘Whites Only’ policy, lifted its ban on entry of Japanese War Brides into the country. For many it resulted in abandonment and hardship for wife and child but on a more positive note, some ex-Australian husbands unlawfully sneaked back into Japan and lived off the radar in order to reunite with their families. In fact, it’s said that the influx of Japanese War Brides when it was finally allowed, started the path to dismantling of the ‘Whites Only’ policy.

Thanks to the OP’s query on this thread, I'm about to re-read it but one paragraph stuck in my mind from the first reading which I've copied here:

<<
HMAS Quiberon in which Gordon Leed served, docked at Nagasaki twice on pirate patrol, but its centre of operations was Kure. One of the ship's officers had 'liberated' a jeep from the US army, for the cost of a bottle of Scotch it seems, and Leed was assigned the job of the ship's driver. This was a more appealing prospect than working in the boiler room stoking the Quiberon's engines. But he soon tired of being pressed into taking naval officers to 'gawk' at the ruins of Hiroshima. Leed loathed what his messmates jokingly called his `Hiroshima taxi run' and resented being used as a tour guide for idle, rubbernecking officers.

One day he decided to show his day-trippers something that was not on their itinerary. He pulled up outside a shelter housing some badly disfigured survivors of the bomb whom he had befriended, and to whom he occasionally gave a `presento' of BCOF rations. He blew the horn, and out came his friends, with faces 'scarred almost beyond belief'.

His passengers were appalled. 'I say Leed,' one of the officers exclaimed, `we came to see the ruins not to be made ill.'

Leed could not contain his anger:

Here were these bloody tourists who wanted to see the wreckage of war but not the suffering that went with it. For the first time in my naval life I was openly insubordinate, replying,

'Those people are the ruins mate.'

>>
 

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