"Japan asks Britain for protection in Iraq"

#1
These Japanese troops requiring protection are presumably the same ones who according to US commentator David Hackworth were doing a much better job in Iraq than the effete Brits. (That was an anti-Hackworth dig, not an anti-Japanese dig!)

I am sure that the Japanese are very welcome members of the coalition, but if they are not able/allowed to defend themselves it is difficult to see what help they can be in the current situation. Worrying to see that part of the job of the protecting troops is to be the focus of local resentment!!

TOKYO (Reuters) - Japan has asked the British army to help protect its troops in southern Iraq after Dutch soldiers withdraw from the area in March next year, a Japanese newspaper said on Sunday.

Japanese and British generals have held discussions, but Britain has so far not promised to send troops to the area, the daily Asahi Shimbun said, without citing sources.

Japan has about 550 troops in the southern Iraq city of Samawa, but its pacifist constitution limits their activities to aid and reconstruction, including providing fresh water.

Dutch troops from a nearby base currently maintain security in Samawa, but the Dutch government has decided to withdraw the troops in March. Dutch Defence Minister Henk Kamp is set to meet Japanese officials this week to explain the decision. ...

Defence chief Yoshinori Ono has expressed expectations of British help in Iraq if the troops stay on, the Asahi said.

"Britain is in control of the entire southern region, so if necessary we will hold full discussions with Britain and have them maintain security," the Asahi quoted Ono as saying at a news conference on Thursday.

If Britain does not send troops to Samawa, Japan will be forced to rely on Iraqi troops for security, the Asahi said.

Japan's defence ministry fears the focus of local people's resentment could switch from Dutch troops to the Japanese after March :roll: , the Asahi said, citing a ministry official. The Japanese camp has been hit by rocket shells, but there have been no casualties so far.
full story at http://in.news.yahoo.com/041128/137/2i5cx.html
 
#2
I agree. Its absurd to protect Japanese troops with UK troops. I would hope the Japanese have the ability to defend themselves if attacked or else they should have never been sent.
 
#4
jonwilly said:
I can hear the Graves turning in the Britsh War Cemetary, Kanachaburi Province on the banks of the Kwai, 600 kms away.
john
It's not the same Japanese. That madness is over. Our country with our allies defeated it.
 
#5
Oh really.
Do you know our new freinds?
The only people who operate a discriminatory policy in Thialand where clubs bars are conncerned.
They haven't changed meet a few, they are still the same underneath.
Things would be different if their government allowed them to defend themselves in Iraq, Falluja would seem like a holdiday camp.
john
Even Kowizumi still visits That war memorial, he knows who cooks his rice.
 
#6
The Japs still haven't properly apologised yet and until they do I don't think that they should be away from the Home Islands with anything more lethal than a pointy stick.
 
#7
they are soldiers arent they tell them to defend themselves or **** off
or let the yanks do if they think the japs are so much better allies than us :twisted:
 

Mr Happy

LE
Moderator
#8
I see it as an excellent opportunity to demostrate the skills of Britfor, we're all in this together so surely its cool? They are, technically there helping us are they not.
 
#10
the japo army seemed to be a pale shadow of itself , mind like it said earlier , they still haven't apologised for all the war crimes and the neigbouring countries still resent them
 
#11
Something that T Bliar would dearly love to call an apology was made a few months ago but it didn't cut any ice with the FEPOWs still left alive...those same FEPOWs who are still campaigning for proper compensation under a PM who is patiently waiting for biology to remove this particularly inconvenient pressure group so that he can snuggle a bit closer to the Nips without some jumped up old soldiers turning their backs on his asiatic friends. :evil:

Having said that, the dutch suffered equally brutal treatment under the 'greater east asia co-prosperity sphere' but they found it in them to do the job up until now.

Hackle, the anti-nippon stance that many people still take today is not quite as anachronistic and unjustified as it might seem. Whilst the Germans entered a period of self-analysis (which in some cases has lasted sixty years) the same is not true of the Japs. The rigidly heirarchical culture that still pervades Japanese race today was almost directly responsible for the deaths of thousands of allied prisoners.

By way of an example, 2,000 men were sent to the island of Haruku in April 1943 to knock the tops off two hills and place the rubble in the valley to create an airstrip. The camp was built from scratch and a request from the medics to site a latrine over a sea inlet was refused because the 'sea belonged to the emperor' and to use it as a latrine was an insult to the emperor. The real reason, the interpreters confessed, was that the Jap NCO would have lost face by acting on the suggestion of a prisoner. The latrine was built six months later but not until a dysentery epidemic had wiped out nearly 300 men.

You only need to talk to people who have done business in Japan to learn that the behavioural code (and therefore the capacity to repeat these mindless acts) remains largely unchanged.
 
#12
Why not let the Japs run a detention centre for the Jinglies? Either that or get them to build a nice new railway for the people of Iraq :lol:
 
#13
stickybomb said:
...Having said that, the dutch suffered equally brutal treatment under the 'greater east asia co-prosperity sphere' but they found it in them to do the job up until now.

Hackle, the anti-nippon stance that many people still take today is not quite as anachronistic and unjustified as it might seem. Whilst the Germans entered a period of self-analysis (which in some cases has lasted sixty years) the same is not true of the Japs. The rigidly heirarchical culture that still pervades Japanese race today was almost directly responsible for the deaths of thousands of allied prisoners... remains largely unchanged.
Interesting points, stickybomb, including that thought about the Dutch. In fact I have family connections with the Far East campaign and I do sympathise with feelings on that score, especially on the part of ex-prisoners.

Although I do remember a small group of Gurkha soldiers going out on the town some years ago and getting attacked by a mob of local yobbos who thought they were Japanese. Ironic or what.
 
#14
The impression I have got from the few Japs I've met is that they try to ignore anything negative about WWII as much as possible. A recent Manga (comic) about the Rape of Nanking was withdrawn after objections from "veterans" groups and an authoress who covered the same topic received death threats. Unlike the Germans they still steadfastly refuse to awknowledge that they did anything wrong and until they do I don't think they shoud be considered fit to be overseas in any sort of combat role.
They seem to hide behind a veneer of pacifism (students at their military academy carry briefcases apparently as a symbol of this) as a means of ignoring and dealing properly with their history. I suspect that this is unhealthy as they are avoiding learning the lessons that most other post -colonial nations learn. Which is bad given the magnitude of their sins. There is probably a good chance that they'll eventually come to the conclusion that it was somebody else's fault and such a grievance may be dangerous.
 
#15
Bladensburg said:
The impression I have got from the few Japs I've met is that they try to ignore anything negative about WWII as much as possible.
The principal problem is the lack of a national focal point. Although we don't realise it, we have a thousand and one reference points for 'framing' the last war from physical memorials to precise dates. Conversely, the Japs have no clear idea when their war started nor what it should be called. From their point of view 'the war' could mean any point from the seizure of Manchuria in 1931 to their surrender in 9 August 1945.

Somewhat understandably, most post-war Japanese art and reportage focused on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and many western journalists encountered a common feeling that the war was something that 'happened' to Japan like a natural disaster rather than something that they provoked or took an active and aggressive part in.

This lack of a national focus combined with the fact that the occupying forces dismantled the Japanese war machine yet never charged Hirohito with war crimes (imagine Hitler surviving and not even being given a suspended sentence!), served to distance the Japanese people from the acts which had been carried out in their name. Naturally, this puzzling lack of culpability cast some doubt in the minds of the subsequent generations and, much like the Holocaust, there are now a sizeable group of right-wing nay-sayers who hold the view that Japan was (and still is) the wronged party.

Remember, all this started when the same rigid Japanese code of behaviour that exists today was harnessed and perverted by a bunch of uniformed gangsters at the beginning of the last century.

If they ask us for protection, the answer should be 'yes' because the thought of the Japanese finding their military feet again just makes my blood run cold.
 
#16
"You only need to talk to people who have done business in Japan to learn that the behavioural code (and therefore the capacity to repeat these mindless acts) remains largely unchanged."

I could not agree more.
john
My father was kicked out of Belgium/France at Dunkik. He never expressed any form of hatred towards the Kraut, just Hitler.
His next war was Burma and even a an old man he would still 'shiver' and become 'tentse' where ever jap and Burma was mentioned.
A generation now mainly gone but if you get the chance please talk to the survivours, They know what they are talking about.
 
#17
A generation now mainly gone but if you get the chance please talk to the survivours, They know what they are talking about.
I do. He does.He won't have anything Japanese in the house.

He saw the horror on the road from Caen to Gernany, culminating in Bergan-Belsen.

But as far as he is concerned , the very worst thing he ever saw, was the Regiment of walking skeletons that came off a train in India.

He hasn't forgotten, and I doubt he will ever forgive.
 
#18
from my late father's copy of FM Bill Slim's Defeat Into Victory, autographed by the author, p 532

Slim said:
There can be no excuse for a nation which as a matter of policy treats its prisoners of war in this way, and no honour for an army, however brave, which willingly makes itself the instrument of such humanity to the helpless.
 
#19
I was at Pegasus Bridge for D Day +60, and met an Old Boy with an MC and Burma Star, etc. As one does, I asked "Excuse me Sir, but how did you get your MC?" He replied, totally deadpan, "I shot a bunch of Japs with my Tommy Gun." He was a Chindit ( which gave me goosebumps, of course. ) After a while I asked him if he forgave - he looked me right in the eye and slowly shook his head, without saying a word.

He did, however, accept my offer of a ( large ) brandy. :lol:

I did get his name, but was so tanked up it instantly escaped me. Four times.
 
#20
True and I agree with that completely. However (just to play Devil's Advocate) you have to remember that they are a completely different culture so it is not as straightforward to apply our way of thinking to them. This was even more true 60 years ago. It is strange for us to think that they did not even regard captured Japanese soldiers as Japanese any more. In any case, I thought the JSDF's pacifist policy was because of its actions in WWII rather than trying to hide it. Don't get me wrong, I believe they do owe our former servicemen an apology.

Am I to assume that these Japanese blokes in Iraq are only support elements? Do they even carry arms? It seems to me that we would be going out of our way to do a job that they are more than capable of doing themselves.
 

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