Jaguar’s commitment to new “x-type”

Discussion in 'Cars, Bikes 'n AFVs' started by RCT(V), Dec 21, 2012.

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  1. RELIEF AT CONFIRMATION OF JAGUAR’S COMMITMENT TOWARDS NEW “X-TYPE”

    References,
    A. AUTOCAR magazine, issue dated 28 NOVEMBER 2012 ( page 13 ).
    B. AUTOCAR magazine, issue dated 05 DECEMBER 2012 ( page 19 ).
    C. AUTOCAR magazine, issue dated 12 DECEMBER 2012 ( page 18 ).

    The commitment from Adrian Hallmark, Jaguar’s Global Brand Director, towards the new “X-Type”; and the enthusiasm for the model from the Jaguar dealers in the USA; is both welcomed and a great relief (Reference C).

    It was a cause for grave concern a couple of weeks earlier (Reference A), when AUTOCAR'S Hilton Holloway, had described a level of (apparent) indecision - verging on paranoia - within Jaguar, towards the new “X-Type” - that it is understood is intended to compete directly with the Audi A4, BMW 3-Series, Mercedes C-Class, and the Volvo S60.

    If Jaguar could not (apparently) “get-behind” the new “X-Type”, it did not bode well for when eventually Jaguar would have to consider an inevitable further, even smaller, model to compete directly with the Audi A3, BMW 1-Series, Mercedes A/B-Class, and the Volvo V40.

    As AUTOCAR's Steve Cropley commented (Reference B), to “brand” these smaller models as anything other than Jaguar, would have been a fatuous distraction, as they would of course, still, inevitably, be perceived by the buying public; the fleet market customers; and, the press; as Jaguar vehicles.

    These smaller vehicles have all done nothing but enhance the quality reputation of the prestigious manufacturers Audi, BMW, Mercedes, and Volvo, now that they all compete in new, wider, market segments - other than their traditional, somewhat exclusive, much smaller “executive” and “luxury” market segments.

    The prestigious, quality, manufacturers such as Jaguar, Audi, BMW, Mercedes, Land Rover and Volvo, do need to achieve a certain overall “critical mass” in production/sales numbers, to be financially viable.
     
  2. That really did give me a chuckle!