"It's alright I only need 2 mags"

#2
You saw it for yourself in the video.When the guy was in the prone, he had to have the rifle at a 45 degree angle just to get a sight picture.
 

Travelgall

LE
Kit Reviewer
#3
Eggs in one basket. Damage the lips of one of your two mags and you're a bit screwed.
 
#5
Mags are too long. It's the same problem with 6.5 and 6.8 30 round mags too. If you could do a quad stack magazine with length of a regular magazine, that's be interesting. I'm guessing 40-45 rounds?
 
#8
Oh bugger, wasn't looking at the big picture there! Then again they don't really demonstrate that mag on a bullpup, how terrible of me to forget about the SA80. What abouuuttt.... a drum that encased... you know what, think I'll leave the inventing for the inventors!
 
#10
Aye I did look them up to see how they worked. Couldn't really find the detrimental effects of being clockwork, but then again didn't look very far for info. The thought did come to mind though. What about a triangle?! I hear they are the strongest shapes... ah shit i'm doing it again!
 

jim24

LE
Book Reviewer
#12
Aye I did look them up to see how they worked. Couldn't really find the detrimental effects of being clockwork, but then again didn't look very far for info. The thought did come to mind though. What about a triangle?! I hear they are the strongest shapes... ah shit i'm doing it again!
The only one I ever reloaded was for a repro 1921 .45 Thomson gun where the rounds were placed in between the unwound spring in alternating groups of four or five, it was a long time ago, and then the back plate was re-screwed on and the spring wound up. if the rounds were miss-placed it then promptly jammed, and the whole thing had to be done over again,
 

jim24

LE
Book Reviewer
#15
News item on the new Magpul magazines for SA80.
BBC News - UK soldiers get new lighter magazine for guns

The Lewis and Russian RP Machine Guns both used large drum magazines, and were known to be quite reliable, the Lewis didn't use clockwork, but a sort ot pawl mechanism instead.
That's not really what we are on about but it's a" Pan Mag" I meant the Drum mags on the Thomson and PPSH, both of which can also take a normal spring loaded box mag, the MG 15/38/42 and GPMG both have a drum mag but it's really just a belt box and not a true Drum Mag
 
#16
The israelis have 50 rounds mags for their Galil and they don't seem to use them often (for those support unit that still use the Galil).


On the other hand, I had read somewhere that in the old days, the SADF liked its 50 rounds mags on the R4 esp. when doing vehicle patrols for the ability they gave to repond immediatly to an ambush with a lot of firepower.
 
#17
Having been out for a while now and not fired anything more modern than the SMG, SLR, LMG ( Bren ) and the SA80 A1....just how well would a rifle deal with putting those amounts of rounds down range?

Would a SA80 A2 for example be able to blast off 4 of those 100 rnd mags at the speed that chap in the video was testing at....I know you wouldnt do it in real life...but could a gun keep performing?
 
#18
The only one I ever reloaded was for a repro 1921 .45 Thomson gun where the rounds were placed in between the unwound spring in alternating groups of four or five, it was a long time ago, and then the back plate was re-screwed on and the spring wound up. if the rounds were miss-placed it then promptly jammed, and the whole thing had to be done over again,
Sounds like a repro drum. Original 50 rd drums by Bridgeport & Seymour are pretty reliable from my experiences shooting M1928A1's Stay away from Kahrs and original Crosby's they suck
 
#19
This is the way to do it.
 

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#20
Look mate, if you've got a weapon like that and you declare that 'this is the way to do it', then I'd predict that no-one is going to disagree.
 
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